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  • Kendo/kumdo and competition

    Hello, I have a few question. Please help a newb out .

    I will be going to UI (http://www.uiowa.edu/~kumdo/) where they have a kum do dojo. I plan to visit and if I like it maybe join and train there. I love competition so if I join can I compete at Kendo events even though it's technically Kum Do? I have done some reading on the differences and noticed that it depends on who you ask. Some say they are exactly the same and some say its like black and white. And in general is this a good sport for competition?

    Thank you
    ES

  • #2
    There's two sides of kendo. The budo side; which is not about competition at all. Then there's the shiai side that is all about winning or losing.

    Its your choice which one to pick

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    • #3
      Well the shiai side is more appealing to me then, but I don't think it has to be "all about winning or losing". I don't think its wrong for people to get together and compete. Loosing is OK, as long as you put all the effort in and respect the other person.

      What about my other question? Can a Kum Do student compete or even continue their training with a Kendo student?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by es0085
        Well the shiai side is more appealing to me then, but I don't think it has to be "all about winning or losing". I don't think its wrong for people to get together and compete. Loosing is OK, as long as you put all the effort in and respect the other person.

        What about my other question? Can a Kum Do student compete or even continue their training with a Kendo student?

        Are you asking if kendo and kumdo are essentially the same? If so, the answer is yes. I've done both and I made the transition without any problems.

        As far as whether you will be able to compete in a kendo shiai or not, technically yes, although it will largely depend on whether or not your particular dojo competes in kendo shiais. (Some Korean dojangs only compete in kumdo competitions for several political reasons, none of which is rooted in the politics and history of Korea and Japan - more to do with IFK and KKF, etc) If that's the only kendo/kumdo school around you, then I would say go ahead, learn kumdo, have fun.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by yohed55
          There's two sides of kendo. The budo side; which is not about competition at all. Then there's the shiai side that is all about winning or losing.

          Its your choice which one to pick
          That's pretty unfair, you've made a false dichotomy out of two things that can get along just fine. What is budo if not about making ones character better and self-improvement. No one does kendo to learn how to cut someone down, if so they are under highly false pretenses, for kendo is about cutting down the bad characteristics within ourselves. In this regard competition can be very useful. Kendo would hardly be the martial way it is if not for shiai, since it can offer invaluable insight into ourselves. Competition shows you how far you can push yourself and losing can provide a valuable lesson into your kendo. Budo not about competition? Psshaw

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MetalCrusade
            That's pretty unfair, you've made a false dichotomy out of two things that can get along just fine. What is budo if not about making ones character better and self-improvement. No one does kendo to learn how to cut someone down, if so they are under highly false pretenses, for kendo is about cutting down the bad characteristics within ourselves. In this regard competition can be very useful. Kendo would hardly be the martial way it is if not for shiai, since it can offer invaluable insight into ourselves. Competition shows you how far you can push yourself and losing can provide a valuable lesson into your kendo. Budo not about competition? Psshaw
            I totally agree, I read the post and I was puzzled as I was never asked to "pick"; then I realized he's 14.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by es0085
              What about my other question? Can a Kum Do student compete or even continue their training with a Kendo student?
              Yes kumdo and kendo can compete (and do) against eac other. And yes you can continue training.

              All clubs have their own style and focus on different areas. So don't be surprised if you are told to do something a different way. Just stand back and try and work what their getting at. I use the mentality of "The destination is same but ther are many roads to get there. Which road is this."

              Also naturaly Kumdo uses the Korean language and Kendo the Japans so ou will need to learn a few new words. Also there are some edicate differences ( but again you should keep an eye out for this no matter what club you visit/join)
              Things to be aware of though depending of the sensei (and club) even though you are training at a club you may be treated as an outsider (either reciving more or less attention)

              Also as noted an aspect of Kendo is shiai. Without it you do not have kendo. The same is also true for the Budo component.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks to all that replied.

                I just have to check the dojo out and see how I like it. Its only $80 a semester and I blew $150 on season football tickets so in comparison its not that bad.

                Thanks again for answering my questions.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by es0085
                  Hello, I have a few question. Please help a newb out .

                  I will be going to UI (http://www.uiowa.edu/~kumdo/) where they have a kum do dojo. I plan to visit and if I like it maybe join and train there. I love competition so if I join can I compete at Kendo events even though it's technically Kum Do? I have done some reading on the differences and noticed that it depends on who you ask. Some say they are exactly the same and some say its like black and white. And in general is this a good sport for competition?

                  Thank you
                  ES
                  My daughter just graduated from UI, (Go Hawkeyes!)

                  I wouldn't worry too much about the differences, or what I or other people have to say about it. Just go check it out and make up your own mind.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kat
                    I totally agree, I read the post and I was puzzled as I was never asked to "pick"; then I realized he's 14.
                    Oh..... Yeah I even think I look stupid after reading that. I was just kind of hitting keys and came up with that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by yohed55
                      Oh..... Yeah I even think I look stupid after reading that. I was just kind of hitting keys and came up with that.
                      Yohed,
                      Sorry, I should have been more clear when I said what I said. I meant that when you are younger, a lot of things are black and white and its not always easy to see the middle ground; in this case, how we can enjoy kendo as a competitive sport but at the same time, respect it as budo. (Especially if you havent been practicing kendo for long.)

                      On a different note, I am truly jealous because I only started kendo when I was 22. I am 30 now but I dont believe that I will ever be able to achieve the same level of kendo (physically speaking) that you will in 10 years. Ganbatte!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeah I am pretty lucky for finding kendo at my age. Then again; when I go to this one large dojo 2 hours away, I see 4 and 5 year olds doing kendo.

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