Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Sanding a Shinai (to remove splinters) Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sanding a Shinai (to remove splinters)

    Hello All,

    Two of my shinai have splinters. I am told that one can use sand paper to remove the splinters. My question is: will doing this weaken the shinai and just how much should I sand away (beyond the obvious of removing splinters and rough areas)?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    I use a razor knife. Always shave off splinters in a upward direction. Going downward tends to dig deeper than needed. Then use sandpaper to smooth edges. Use your own judgement. You'll know when to stop.

    Comment


    • #3
      Another method instead of sandpaper is to use an old coke or kikkoman soy sauce bottle. Press down with the bottle as hard as you can and rub up and down the effected area. This "burnishing" helps to compress the fibres and I find as effective if not more than sandpaper, which burrs the bamboo fibres. I also find this is very effective as a preventative treatment: burnish the edges of all slats from about half way up the shinai to the tip. Then vegetable oil to replenish the moisture in the bamboo (important if you live in dry, temperate climes like southern Aus). Some people also recommend rubbing a candle along the same area to assist frictionless movement of the slats against each other.

      b

      Comment


      • #4
        Serious Inquiry

        Originally posted by ben View Post
        Another method instead of sandpaper is to use an old coke or kikkoman soy sauce bottle. Press down with the bottle as hard as you can and rub up and down the effected area. This "burnishing" helps to compress the fibres and I find as effective if not more than sandpaper, which burrs the bamboo fibres. I also find this is very effective as a preventative treatment: burnish the edges of all slats from about half way up the shinai to the tip. Then vegetable oil to replenish the moisture in the bamboo (important if you live in dry, temperate climes like southern Aus). Some people also recommend rubbing a candle along the same area to assist frictionless movement of the slats against each other.

        b
        I buy 1/2 dozen cheap shinai, at a time (they cost about $20). When I see splinters, I toss them. I've been doing kendo for 6 years and I really can't tell a significant difference between the cheapos I buy and the expensive ones. I use sports tape on the tsuka to adjust the hand size and when it wears, I simply replace the tape. Am I just insensitive and unskilled or is there a real meaningful difference in shinai that effects your technique?

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow, should be careful when you load your questions, they may go of accidentally!

          Shame the choices you gave us make no sense when arguing that there is no difference.

          I'll go for option B! There is a difference and you're not unskilled/insensitive.

          As an aside, I think the difference is psychologically reinforced by the desire to own quality kit.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Old Warrior View Post
            I use sports tape on the tsuka to adjust the hand size and when it wears, I simply replace the tape.
            I've done that too, it's worth running a craft blade through the gap in the staves so it has the same flexibility it would have without [unless you do that also]. Certainly helps the tsuba stay in place.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ben View Post
              Another method instead of sandpaper is to use an old coke or kikkoman soy sauce bottle. Press down with the bottle as hard as you can and rub up and down the effected area. This "burnishing" helps to compress the fibres and I find as effective if not more than sandpaper, which burrs the bamboo fibres. I also find this is very effective as a preventative treatment: burnish the edges of all slats from about half way up the shinai to the tip. Then vegetable oil to replenish the moisture in the bamboo (important if you live in dry, temperate climes like southern Aus). Some people also recommend rubbing a candle along the same area to assist frictionless movement of the slats against each other.

              b
              Wow new idea!

              I normally use candle to wax the edges after sanding by merely rubbing the stub of the candle on them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Could the action of "burning" the bamboo with sandpaper potentially harden the bamboo?
                My thinking behind it is much similar to the smoked bamboo shinai you can get i.e. the tiny particles of smoke (or bamboo smoke in this case) in fill the gaps in the bamboo making it harder?

                It might make a difference but i dunno.. it seems that shinai life is dictated by the gods! I've had the same shinai since i started kendo about a year and a half ago... tis the one i posted about it having a wonky handle.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I said "burr" as in to make fuzzy, not "burn". You'd have to sand with some kind of high speed belt sander in order to get burns happening. You'd also send right through your slat in a few seconds.

                  I've no idea of the science (or otherwise) of smoking shinais.

                  b

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ben View Post
                    I said "burr" as in to make fuzzy, not "burn". You'd have to sand with some kind of high speed belt sander in order to get burns happening. You'd also send right through your slat in a few seconds.

                    I've no idea of the science (or otherwise) of smoking shinais.

                    b
                    You also said "burnish" which may be where the confusion came in. It could also make the outside hard. I've heard the Coke bottle mentioned before, I always assumed it was a broken glass edge for shaving not the smooth side for rubbing but I can see how that might be an option

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One of belgiums most known sensei once told me to break a milkglass and use a piece of glass to shave off splinters, and never to use sandpaper...
                      when shaving off splinters always go the opposit direction of the splinter so you dont tear it out, making it deeper, forcing you to sand down more.
                      I lightly sand my shinais every couple of months, if I notice splinters I fix them with the glass, if they are to big, the slate goes. I never use sandpaper to sand out splinters, only for smoothening the final surface I use a very fine sanding paper.

                      If you oil your shinais regularly you wont have to fix splinters that often

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yup, my eyes deceived.

                        Apologies.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X