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Kumdo / Kendo terminology

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  • #16
    Sempai and kohai is "awkward" to define. Different things to different people and can change in different situations.

    The usual translation of "sensei" is "teacher" - master is a term we don't normally use.
    Out of curiosity - how do you define between sensei and renshi if both mean teacher? And in the cases of there being no sensei, then surely a sempai is a teacher as well. I mean, I know the difference and understand them but writing it down is something else.

    We've got one kumdo practitioner in our kendo dojo and quite a few Korean kendo practitioners so I reckon this list is a fantastic idea!

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    • #17
      Renshi, Kyoshi and Hanshi all pretty much mean 'teacher' (with different nuances, obviously - see below). 'Kyoshi' is the generic word used for a teacher. 'Sensei' on the other hand is an honorific term. Therefore if you refer to yourself as a teacher you should really say 'kyoshi,' and not 'sensei.'

      Renshi is 錬師 - training/refining teacher
      Kyoshi is 教師 - teaching/educating teacher
      Hanshi is 範師 - model/example teacher

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      • #18
        YUP it all sounds the same to me..

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Oroshi View Post
          Renshi, Kyoshi and Hanshi all pretty much mean 'teacher' (with different nuances, obviously - see below). 'Kyoshi' is the generic word used for a teacher. 'Sensei' on the other hand is an honorific term. Therefore if you refer to yourself as a teacher you should really say 'kyoshi,' and not 'sensei.'

          Renshi is 錬師 - training/refining teacher
          Kyoshi is 教師 - teaching/educating teacher
          Hanshi is 範師 - model/example teacher
          Wrong "shi". The shi in the generic teacher kyoshi is written 師, whereas the kendo shogo uses 士, same shi as bushi. So hanshi (範士) means model gentleman/warrior.

          See this article for more.

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          • #20
            The Korean terms are only phonetic translations - and there is no set official way to spell them. Some may say "Gum Do", others "Gumdo", some "Kum Do", others "Kumdo" - but they all relate a similar sound.

            Many (most) training in TKD will not be familiar with the Korean terms as the Korean instructors have always translated most terms into the vernacular. They use literal translations (dorachugi means turn (dora) kick (chugi) - so in class it's called 'turnkick', some schools may call it 'turning kick'). The karate equivolent is 'roundhouse kick'.

            The learning curve of terminology is not so steep as you don't have learn foreign terms. Even at higher belt levels you only get a brief introduction to the Korean terms. Basic commands (attention, bow, turn) and counting would be in Korean, but the actual technique would be named in English.

            So, to be fair, I can't give the Japanese equivalents to all the terms (as I have not learned them yet).

            As for Kumdo - pronounced "coom dough" ("Do" meaning and being said the same in Japanese as in Korean) - I do not know if they use more Korean terminology (for everything) like Kendo uses Japanese.

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            • #21
              WES we use all Korean terms in class. gradings are hard

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Wesley Myers View Post
                I do not know if they use more Korean terminology (for everything) like Kendo uses Japanese.
                Our club does, actually. Hence the need for the document!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
                  Wrong "shi". The shi in the generic teacher kyoshi is written 師, whereas the kendo shogo uses 士, same shi as bushi. So hanshi (範士) means model gentleman/warrior.

                  See this article for more.
                  You're right, of course! What's happened to my Japanese!!?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Oroshi View Post
                    You're right, of course! What's happened to my Japanese!!?
                    It's way better than mine. I just look this stuff up. But I always remember Meik's article because I found that really interesting.

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                    • #25
                      I agree, that was very interesting.

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                      • #26
                        There are a couple of official romanization methods for Korean. I gave up after I realized that I was mixing two different methods in the same sentence... As a side note, my personal experience has been that sabumnim is something that is used up to about 7 dan. The 8dan I've met are usually addressed as seunsaengnim. I guess it would be the difference between instructor and master.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
                          "Wakare" means "separate"
                          I am in the process of updating the list. What term would you use if you wanted to halt practice briefly and quickly to explain something?

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Wesley Myers View Post
                            Hi,

                            Here are some quick reference to Korean - English titles:

                            do joo nim : founder (of the art)
                            kwan jang nim : grandmaster
                            chung sah nim : chief instructor (or "chief master")
                            sah bum nim : master instructor - this is more for a master instructor - not for ranks lower than master.
                            sah boo nim : more intimate and respectful form of "sah bum nim"; literally "teaching father"
                            kyo sah nim : teacher (also "seon saeng nim") - this is more like just a general 'sensei' term.
                            sun bae nim : senior student
                            hu bae nim : junior student
                            hak saeng : student
                            suryun saeng : trainee
                            jeja : pupil
                            joo sim : referee
                            bu sim : judge
                            bae sim : juror
                            kae sim : time keeper
                            ki rohk : recorder
                            hu bae is called hu bae, not hu bae nim since that 'nim' imply someone of respect. and it's just not done.

                            pete

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by verissimus View Post
                              I am in the process of updating the list. What term would you use if you wanted to halt practice briefly and quickly to explain something?
                              Yame, "stop". In judo we say "matte" which means "wait", but I haven't heard that in a kendo dojo.

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                              • #30
                                Well, here's an update:

                                http://kendo.tamu.edu/terminology.pdf

                                Everyone is welcome to link to it. Suggestions / corrections are also welcome.

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