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Kumdo / Kendo terminology

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  • #31
    nice, thanks for looking out for us kumdo guys.

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    • #32
      Hey it's not as though we're a particularly oppressed group...

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      • #33
        NO, but we seem to be the outcast at times So much fun.
        talked to my wife she said I could come up. still trying to talk my
        kumdo bud to come with me.

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        • #34
          Hey guys,

          Sorry I haven't posted very much - we got rid of the internet for the summer months and I can only post at work.

          I wanted to ask a few questions about Kumdo. How many kup do you have? (kup is the same as kyu - non-black belt belt level - in case you don't have that in your list) Is it 6 like in Kendo or 10 like in TKD? How are you tests conducted? Do you have a formal test for each kup? Do you learn a new poomse (form - Japanese equivalent is kata) for each test? Do your higher belts do forms with iaitoh (blunted steel swords) for the tests? (I have seen pictures of Kumdo tests and all the students had iaitoh's but I don't know if that's typical and do you have to supply it or the school?) Is your school (dojang - Japanese word equivalent is dojo) a privately owned building or do you just use space (gym) at a health club or school? Do you have seminars like in Kendo where other master instructors (sensei's) from other schools/clubs come and teach or are the students only taught by the instructor's from your school? Do you use bokken (mokgum) for a lot of waza (techniques) practice? Are your forms only the sames ones as the All Japan Kendo Federation forms http://www.yorku.ca/kendo/KendoForms.htm or do you have extra forms on top of them?

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          • #35
            Speaking for TAMU-KDK, we're basically kendo, but with Korean terminology and without sonkyo (although we do use sonkyo for kata practice). We use the university Rec Center (and its nice wooden floors ) for practice. We use bokken for kata and sometimes for drills (to get the angle of the strike correct). We have the regular 7+3 kata.

            Regarding geup, almost all our club members are unranked, since we are not affiliated with the AUSKF. We've not been able to decide what to do about it; the basic problem is that we don't have a strong, regular member pool since it's a university club in a small town, and people graduate and leave. Those who are ranked, got their rank elsewhere before moving here.
            Last edited by verissimus; 22nd September 2007, 03:44 AM. Reason: Grammar

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            • #36
              we are the same as verissimus, but we have a dojang. we never use sonkyo.
              I like having a dojang. ac in the summer and heat in the winter. I have been doing kumdo for almost two years, 3 to 4 days a week. I have only tested 2 times.

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              • #37
                The document has now moved here.

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                • #38
                  Wow that's an old style of transliteration. Some of the terms are also different than what I've learned, which is totally normal, different instructors will use different terms, but some are wrong. "Yeon-sup-si-hap", for example, is (literally) a practice shiai (shiai geiko is the term I see being used here), not jigeiko. Also as an example of pronunciation, Kirikaeshi would be pronounced "Yeonggyok" (Young Gyock) not "yung-keok" (Young cock? No thanks!)

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                  • #39
                    OK, I'll fix it, as soon as I can find the TeX source on my old machine.

                    I am not too bothered about the spelling, actually. I've seen 'thank you' spelt 'kamsahamnida' as well as 'gamsahamnida'. Not that I have any depth of knowledge of Korean, but I get the feeling that when shouted out, they're fairly good approximations.

                    Do let me know of any more corrections or additions via PM. I'd like to make this as comprehensive as possible.

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                    • #40
                      Thank you thank you thank you for putting this list together! I couldn't find a list of Japanese terms vs Korean ones and the English explanations I was getting were confusing. This is so helpful!

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by kikisheep View Post
                        Thank you thank you thank you for putting this list together! I couldn't find a list of Japanese terms vs Korean ones and the English explanations I was getting were confusing. This is so helpful!
                        I hate to resurrect a dead thread but I was curious where I could find this file. I have a new Korean student with us and I want to make his transition as easy as I can.

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                        • #42
                          The file is currently hosted at http://www.mountainviewkendo.org/links/documents.

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                          • #43
                            It is very useful for a starter like me. Thanks for sharing.

                            p.s. OP may edit his first post with the link above for faster reach

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