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  • Kumdo / Kendo terminology

    Hi all,

    Some of the members of our club helped put together a glossary of kumdo / kendo terms (Korean / Japanese / English). We have tried to make the list exhaustive; hopefully it will be of help to those whose native language is not Korean or Japanese.

    http://kendo.tamu.edu/documents.html

  • #2
    This is a good project as the Korean-English-Japanese translation question is often asked. So I took some time to provide a few corrections on the Japanese side, maybe some of our kumdo friends can double-check the Korean terminology.

    The usual translation of "sensei" is "teacher" - master is a term we don't normally use. I thought the Korean equivalent was "sabunim"?

    "receiver, in drills" would be a more consistent translation of "motodachi" given your other translations.

    I never like simple translations of "sempai" and "kohai", as those two positions only exist in relation to each other and you are both sempai and kohai unless it's your first day in the dojo.

    "Kodansha" refers to senior dan grades (usually 6 and up? we don't use the term much here). The term you're looking for is "yudansha".

    "Keiko" and "geiko" are the same word, so just list keiko.

    "Nukito" and "osameto" are not necessarily related to sonkyo.

    "Wakare" means "separate"

    "Issoku itto ma" is not the same as "yokote ma" - a better translation is "one step strike distance", the farthest distance you can hit from with one step.

    "Toma" is simply "far distance", any distance requiring more than one step to strike.

    "Chika-ma" is "close distance", any distance where no step is required to strike. I don't know what to call the distance between issoku itto ma and chika-ma.

    Jigeiko is "free practice", not necessarily sparring practice.

    Suriage is a sliding upward block, not a twisting block (suri == slide, age == up). Suriage uchi would be sliding upward hit, haven't heard that term before.

    Harai means sweep, it's not really a block

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, I will update the list (after confirming with the original authors).

      Other suggestions/edits will be appreciated.

      Our idea was to create a list so that we don't end up looking lost when we visit other dojos.

      Comment


      • #4
        Neil's picked up on most of the things I spotted. Here's two more:

        'Waki gakame' should be 'waki gamae' (probably a typo).
        Putting away the sword is not 'notto' but 'noto' (a common mistake).

        Other than that, good job

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi,

          Here are some quick reference to Korean - English titles:

          do joo nim : founder (of the art)
          kwan jang nim : grandmaster
          chung sah nim : chief instructor (or "chief master")
          sah bum nim : master instructor - this is more for a master instructor - not for ranks lower than master.
          sah boo nim : more intimate and respectful form of "sah bum nim"; literally "teaching father"
          kyo sah nim : teacher (also "seon saeng nim") - this is more like just a general 'sensei' term.
          sun bae nim : senior student
          hu bae nim : junior student
          hak saeng : student
          suryun saeng : trainee
          jeja : pupil
          joo sim : referee
          bu sim : judge
          bae sim : juror
          kae sim : time keeper
          ki rohk : recorder

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by verissimus View Post
            Hi all,

            Some of the members of our club helped put together a glossary of kumdo / kendo terms (Korean / Japanese / English). We have tried to make the list exhaustive; hopefully it will be of help to those whose native language is not Korean or Japanese.

            http://kendo.tamu.edu/documents.html
            Well done

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by verissimus View Post
              Hi all,

              Some of the members of our club helped put together a glossary of kumdo / kendo terms (Korean / Japanese / English). We have tried to make the list exhaustive; hopefully it will be of help to those whose native language is not Korean or Japanese.

              http://kendo.tamu.edu/documents.html
              Go Aggies !

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wesley Myers View Post
                Hi,

                Here are some quick reference to Korean - English titles:

                do joo nim : founder (of the art)
                kwan jang nim : grandmaster
                chung sah nim : chief instructor (or "chief master")
                sah bum nim : master instructor - this is more for a master instructor - not for ranks lower than master.
                sah boo nim : more intimate and respectful form of "sah bum nim"; literally "teaching father"
                kyo sah nim : teacher (also "seon saeng nim") - this is more like just a general 'sensei' term.
                sun bae nim : senior student
                hu bae nim : junior student
                hak saeng : student
                suryun saeng : trainee
                jeja : pupil
                joo sim : referee
                bu sim : judge
                bae sim : juror
                kae sim : time keeper
                ki rohk : recorder
                Thanks... for the sake of completeness, could you also provide the Japanese equivalents?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Verissimus, nice work I will show this to sabumnim kim..hope to train with you still..

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    forgot, kirikaeshi is yeon gyeok. dont no if that is spelled right.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by verissimus View Post
                      Thanks... for the sake of completeness, could you also provide the Japanese equivalents?
                      Wes' background is mostly in taekwondo, he's new to kendo. I'll give it a shot. If I skip a term, there's no common kendo equivalent that I'm aware of, but others may know of a word.

                      (various instructor ranks) - we call everyone sensei
                      (various student ranks) - there must be a generic word for student, we just say kendoka in my club
                      referee - shimpan
                      judge - maybe shushin, the main referee alternately shimpan-cho, the head judge overseeing all courts
                      juror - maybe fukushin, the corner judges?
                      time keeper - tokei gakari
                      recorder - kiroku gakari (official scores), keiji gakari (scoreboard keeper)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm guessing senior student is just 'sempai' (先輩) and junior student is 'kohai' (後輩). A generic word for student in Japanese... well, you can say 'senshu' (選手 - player) or possibly 'dojosei' (道場生). The normal words for 'student' ('gakusei' and 'seito') generally only refer to people in educational establishments.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As I said before, I don't like simplistic translations of sempai and kohai. People then think it is some sort of rank or station you achieve, when really it is just your relationship to those that are senior and junior to you personally. I've actually seen karate dojo where people wear arm patches that say "sempai".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I suppose it would be fair to use "senior student (in comparison) = sempai", "junior student (in comparison) = kohai", to get the point across?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Shawn Dormishev View Post
                              forgot, kirikaeshi is yeon gyeok. dont no if that is spelled right.
                              I've actually come across several acceptable spellings. For example, I have seen the head strike spelt "mo-ri", "meu-ri", or "muh-ri". I think when we yell it all sounds the same .

                              Comment

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