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proper grip for shinai doing men strike

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  • proper grip for shinai doing men strike

    So this past saturday, sensei mentioned a couple times I should be keeping my grip more relaxed, like there should be a feeling as if I'm going to throw my shinai forward. (what?! those blisters are a sign of my massive manliness!)

    OK so seriously, I've been working on this and now when I do men strikes, my right hand wants to slide down the tsuka during the strike. Am I taking the relaxed bit too far?

    Yes, I could ask my sensei but I'd rather not have sensei think I'm stupid in addition to being slow and incompetent.
    Besides, I won't see her again until Saturday and was hoping for a quick answer so I don't form a bad habit.
    Oh yeah, I still hate making noise, I think I'm gonna perfect the silent kiai.

    sean

  • #2
    Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
    Yes, I could ask my sensei but I'd rather not have sensei think I'm stupid in addition to being slow and incompetent.
    sean
    Since know one here can see your Kendo, and therefore no one can really advise you properly, I suggest you throw away your pride and ask your Sensei anyway.

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    • #3
      It really is the kind of thing we need to show you in person. Ask your sensei.

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      • #4
        Well none of the instructors at GKA will think badly of you for asking. Although if you really try to perfect a silent kiai they may be somewhat dismayed with you.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
          So this past saturday, sensei mentioned a couple times I should be keeping my grip more relaxed, like there should be a feeling as if I'm going to throw my shinai forward. (what?! those blisters are a sign of my massive manliness!)

          OK so seriously, I've been working on this and now when I do men strikes, my right hand wants to slide down the tsuka during the strike. Am I taking the relaxed bit too far?

          Yes, I could ask my sensei but I'd rather not have sensei think I'm stupid in addition to being slow and incompetent.
          Besides, I won't see her again until Saturday and was hoping for a quick answer so I don't form a bad habit.
          Oh yeah, I still hate making noise, I think I'm gonna perfect the silent kiai.

          sean
          I know what your sensei is saying (I also describe it as a two-handed, forward-throw motion) but your right hand should definitely not be sliding. Ask her to elaborate. She may explain both wrists need to be limber and your right hand in particular not locked in a death-grip on the shinai during the swing. The grip of the hands is critical for a correct cut so get the details through your sensei - don't belittle yourself, just ask. As for making noise, that's not the purpose of kiai as you know. You'll find a way to overcome silence like everyone else.

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          • #6
            To drag the thread off topic, silent kiai is perfectly possible, it's just easier with noise. That's not the kendo way though, so you'll just have to get used to making noise...

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            • #7
              Thanks guys, that helps. I'm really enjoying the kendo practice but since I tend to make sure I do at least a little bit every day, I didn't want to start a bad habit and have sensei correct me again in the next class.

              re: the kiai, I know it's more than just noise but it's the noise part that I have the most trouble with. Even after doing karate for about 14 yrs, I never truly got comfortable with the kiai. Mainly because I hate being the center of attention. So, doing anything that specifically draws attention to me is just against my nature.
              How about I roar like a moonbeam?

              In karate I could get away with being mostly quiet because kata only have 1-2 kiai in them but kendo is really forcing me to deal with this bit of insecurity. In spite of that, I'm really enjoying myself so I'm sure this will be just a minor obstacle, I shall crush in due time. Then you will all be saying "shut up already, sheesh!"

              (oh yeah look what you created)

              sean

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              • #8
                well yea, cant say anythin since i dont see it lol , nah but yea ask your sensei , every dojo has there different style.

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                • #9
                  Sean,

                  If you don't have a proper kiai you can't achieve ki ken tai ichi which is required to score.

                  Gambatte kudosai on your journey into learning more kendo.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                    Mainly because I hate being the center of attention. So, doing anything that specifically draws attention to me is just against my nature.
                    You might notice that during practise the silent ones are those drawing attention to themselves... Not the loud ones.

                    I had the same trouble at first and then I was told on here to kiai while being alone, in the car for example. That really helped me after the first awkward attempts.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                      Oh yeah, I still hate making noise, I think I'm gonna perfect the silent kiai.
                      As you're a '99th kyu' might I point out that the only thing you definitely can do is make noise. No one other than another beginner is going to feel the least trepidation facing you at this stage, the only way you can win is by having the biggest, loudest and longest kiai in the club. Additionally it actually will make you feel less like a beginner if you do, like you're one of the guys because they don't feel embarrased, so why should you.

                      To put another spin on it when trying to effect ki ken tai ichi, where mind body and spirit all strike at once, well that's never going to happen for you at this stage so getting a good kiai will help and certainly help to mask any mis-timings of those components. As so many people are focussing on this aspect of your thread you should certainly realise hot important it is.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                        (what?! those blisters are a sign of my massive manliness!)
                        Ask Barr sensei to show you her hands.

                        Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                        OK so seriously, I've been working on this and now when I do men strikes, my right hand wants to slide down the tsuka during the strike. Am I taking the relaxed bit too far?
                        There comes a time when you tighten up, at the moment of impact. You will see this often in your kendo career, I call it "the dialectic of kendo". You go from one extreme to another then find a mid point that become your new starting point. You are always adjusting and correcting andd polishing until after 20 or 30 years you find "your kendo".

                        Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                        Yes, I could ask my sensei but I'd rather not have sensei think I'm stupid in addition to being slow and incompetent.
                        Don't worry, she already knows

                        Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                        Besides, I won't see her again until Saturday and was hoping for a quick answer so I don't form a bad habit.
                        Kendo takes a lifetime to learn. What is the rush?

                        Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                        Oh yeah, I still hate making noise, I think I'm gonna perfect the silent kiai.
                        That is a good goal but practice it at home for at least 20 years before you try it in the dojo. Also consider that the kia helps build stamina and lung capacity.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Shucks!

                          Originally posted by Ignatz View Post




                          Kendo takes a lifetime to learn. What is the rush?

                          Now you're telling me! Alright I'll take it slow from now on.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                            ...Mainly because I hate being the center of attention. So, doing anything that specifically draws attention to me is just against my nature....

                            ...kendo is really forcing me to deal with this bit of insecurity....

                            Ah yes, I think Kendo has a very unique way of casting all of ones insecurities in a harsh glaring light right away. It comes through the physical kendo in a number of ways. This is a major part of training, after all if you look at the four poisons that cause defeat in kendo the first two are Fear and Doubt, and what is "insecurity" than the combination of fear and doubt?

                            Its very challenging to overcome ones ingrained personality habits, probably much more so than technical kendo. Technical kendo is pretty easy actually, I find that my own personality foibles are taking much longer to overcome.

                            I think perhaps, the best way for you to think about it is when you are in a match or fighting and definately grading, you want very much to be the center of attention. You want the judges to be looking at you, you want the referees to be paying you more attention than your opponent. You want the judges to go "oh, this is promising, I should look closely" rather than "oh the other candidate is drawing my attention", and with the refs, you want the same thing, you want them to be watching you more closely, no? Even if they're "supposed" to be splitting attention equally between you and your opponent, if they're watching you when you go for strike, you're incrementally more likely to score.

                            Also, a kiai like the shinai is a tool and a weapon. A hachidan sensei who teaches in this area often tells us "even a beginner can beat a sensei with kiai". It is just as much a method of establishing control and dominance over a situation (fight) as the shinai is...

                            Good luck!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by enkorat View Post
                              Also, a kiai like the shinai is a tool and a weapon.
                              That is probably the most productive way for me to think about kiai at this point.

                              Originally posted by lucy
                              I had the same trouble at first and then I was told on here to kiai while being alone, in the car for example.
                              Yes, yes, as if my driving doesn't scare people enough, this will be a good addition to my repertoire.

                              Arigato all. I knew this bit was important but figured it would just come in it's own good time. I realize now that this really is just my way of avoiding an uncomfortable issue. I am now determined to devote some extra work on just this aspect of myself.

                              sean

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