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  • Not sure if Kendo is what I'm looking for.

    I'm in a bit of a quandry. I've always been interested in martial arts in general and sword work in particular. However Kendo as I understand it, was never a big draw to me. One reason I'm wanting to get training in sword work is that I have always wanted to own a katana but I come from a background where you don't own anything you don't know how to actually use. I don't mean in a tournament setting either, I mean practical use "in real life" as it were. From what I've read it seems Iaido would be more of what I'm looking for but I figured I'd ask and get some opinions on the matter. Unfortunately, it's proving difficult to find places near me that actually teach Iaido so I may wind up starting with Kendo anyway and later moving on to Iaido after college depending on where I relocate (currently in college now).

    I guess what I'm looking for is an art that while in practice may use wooden or dulled blades is actually directly applicable to using live steel. Is there such a thing in practice today? Thank you for any advice/information you guys and gals can give me.

  • #2
    You Should try both

    Im no expert but I have seen that many people that practice Iaido also practice Kendo

    Some say that Kendo makes up for the lack of fisical contact that Iaido lacks, as no actual hitting is made...again Im no expert but thats what I ve read here and there

    As I see it There is no harm on doing both.... I would if there was a Iaido dojo near me.

    Comment


    • #3
      Firstly see what arts are available in your area (other Americans on here can point you in the right direction there). If there's Kendo and no Iaido then bear in mind you don't use a shinai like a sword, but there are enough similarities to make it worthwhile. However, Kendo no Kata involves the use of bokuto (wooden swords) which should be more what you're looking for. You'll probably enjoy yourself a lot in the process! As and when you find an Iaido dojo you'll definitely have a head start if you have a good grounding in Kendo under your belt.

      Good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well Atlanta is your best bet, you're not too far from there but I don't know what kind of mobility you have in terms of getting to a practice. There are more than one kendo club in Atlanta area if you want to go and observe a class or two. There are also some shinkendo and batto do practices in that area. I'm pretty sure there is iaido as well but the kendo clubs are the only ones I am familiar with. A quick look on google for kendo iaido in Atlanta should bring up several possibilities. One caveat, not all classes advertised on the internet are necessarily great schools so it's always good to do a bit of investigation before committing.

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        • #5
          I have been doing Kendo in Japan since October. I feel what I get from it is discipline, a great workout, and patience. Being good with a katana is not my goal though, it would be a perk if anything. So I feel it is a good martial art.

          Good luck in finding what you want!

          Comment


          • #6
            Iaido could be a martial art to try, though, from what you are describing, Shinkendo seems to be more up your alley. There are actually a few Shinkendo places that opened up in the Atlanta area, with the Acworth location being the closest. Take a look at the Shinkendo federation website for locations and information about the curriculum.

            As for Iaido, I know there is one somewhere in Gwinnett County since one of my friends goes there but I don't know the location. This is pretty much the only reputable Iaido place that I could find on the internet though.

            Peachtree Aikikai - I heard that this place was legit on e-budo a while back. Though I also read that you have to be enrolled in the aikido class before you are allowed to take Iaido. I'm not sure if that has changed though as it's been a few years.

            There is another place in Dahlonega (pretty far though) called the Mountain Warrior Dojo that also teaches Kendo and Iaido, but something doesn't feel right, considering that both the Kendo and Iaido are in the American Hanashi Ryu federation where you need a name and password to get into the federation website. Other people might be able to chime in on this.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by fauxfire76 View Post
              I don't mean in a tournament setting either, I mean practical use "in real life" as it were.
              "Practical" and swords don't exactly go together.

              For iaido in GA, there aren't too many options. One guy teaches at a college but you have to be a member of the college. I think it's at UGA but not positive. I could find out though if you're still trying to choose what college to go to. I've also been told that if you study under him, you are not allowed to study under anyone else, no kendo, no other iaido, etc.

              The only other legitimate option I know of is at roswell budokan.

              Don't know anything else about them. Never studied there or met the people.

              As for kendo, I'm partial to my dojo of course, but you also have that option at roswell budokan and they have several good sensei there.

              These are the only legitimate options I know of in GA. If you go, make sure they are AUSKF affiliated because otherwise, you're probably not learning the real thing.

              Kendo and iaido are complementary arts and I think you shouldn't ignore kendo just because you think it's not practical. Doing something because it's fun is a good enough reason. And you won't know if it's for you if you never try it. Honestly, I never thought kendo would be all that great and I ignored it for years though my karate sensei suggested it would be valuable to me. Now I'm sorry I waited so long.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Martch View Post
                ...you don't use a shinai like a sword...
                Speak for yourself mate...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by D'Artagnan View Post
                  Speak for yourself mate...
                  Well, I keep getting told off when I use an iaito like a shinai!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fauxfire76 View Post
                    I'm in a bit of a quandry. I've always been interested in martial arts in general and sword work in particular. However Kendo as I understand it, was never a big draw to me. One reason I'm wanting to get training in sword work is that I have always wanted to own a katana but I come from a background where you don't own anything you don't know how to actually use. I don't mean in a tournament setting either, I mean practical use "in real life" as it were. From what I've read it seems Iaido would be more of what I'm looking for but I figured I'd ask and get some opinions on the matter. Unfortunately, it's proving difficult to find places near me that actually teach Iaido so I may wind up starting with Kendo anyway and later moving on to Iaido after college depending on where I relocate (currently in college now).

                    I guess what I'm looking for is an art that while in practice may use wooden or dulled blades is actually directly applicable to using live steel. Is there such a thing in practice today? Thank you for any advice/information you guys and gals can give me.
                    Why not actually find a dojo, try a few classes, and then decide whether or not it's for you? Also, could you elaborate on what you mean by, "...practical use 'in real life' as it were,"? Are you looking to take a shinken and cut apart water bottles, do backyard tameshigiri, or study a martial art? If you're only looking to do the first option, no point in taking up a martial art. Same thing if you're looking for the second option unless it's part of the curriculum. If the third, then why not get an introduction through kendo and then when it becomes more easily available, seek out an iaido dojo? Just my two cents.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well...eh I feel lazy to help someone unsure of themself.

                      check the kendo federation for a iaido dojo or kendo see if its for you. Personally I advocate trying to experience anything and everything

                      also try shinkendo http://www.shinkendo.com/dojos/georgia.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here Here!

                        Originally posted by D'Artagnan View Post
                        Speak for yourself mate...
                        Word to that!

                        Sorry folks. I'm pretty sure that learning how to FIGHT is sort of a necessary prerequisite course to learning to use the sword quote, in real life, unquote. Just using this as an example--there are plenty of iai people that have a good handle on how to draw the sword but have no functional knowledge of how to face and defeat an opponent in combat.

                        No disrespect to iai at all, of course. There are plenty of kendo people in the same boat. But you get my point.

                        Just like the old maxim says: Win, then strike. Have to know how to do the first to make the second work, in my (oh so humble) opinion.
                        Last edited by EndureForte; 30th July 2009, 07:45 AM. Reason: typo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EndureForte View Post
                          Word to that!

                          Sorry folks. I'm pretty sure that learning how to FIGHT is sort of a necessary prerequisite course to learning to use the sword quote, in real life, unquote. Just using this as an example--there are plenty of iai people that have a good handle on how to draw the sword but have no functional knowledge of how to face and defeat an opponent in combat.

                          No disrespect to iai at all, of course. There are plenty of kendo people in the same boat. But you get my point.

                          Just like the old maxim says: Win, then strike. Have to know how to do the first to make the second work, in my (oh so humble) opinion.
                          Bear in mind though the point of iai as well as kendo is learning to defeat an enemy in a fight - it's not just pretty sword drawing and waving around.
                          Last edited by Martch; 30th July 2009, 05:12 PM. Reason: typo

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Martch View Post
                            Well, I keep getting told off when I use an iaito like a shinai!!
                            It's your insistence on Taiatarii and Hiki-waza that
                            get you into bother!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by still learning View Post
                              It's your insistence on Taiatarii and Hiki-waza that
                              get you into bother!
                              I know, I MUST stop doing that in Sanpo Giri!

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