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  • asking senpai's for their advice after practice

    Hello everyone, something similar to this was posted before but that was over a year before and I wasn't sure if anyone would respond to it or not :S. Anyway, my question is after practice (after we bow to the sensei and to the dojo) do we have to go up to *all* the people we jigeko-ed with and ask for their advice on whatever they noticed (I am fairly new to everything at my dojo so they are basically all my senpai's, with just 2 exceptions, and I went up to all of them after practice a few days ago and they all had good advice) however, by the time I'm done with one or two, all the rest are gone to change or packing up. So, basically I just wanted to know if I should disturb them while they are packing or if I should just go and change myself, and if I have to go up to all the people I jigeko-ed with.
    Sorry that it was so long, I just wanted to try to make it clear what my question/problem was

  • #2
    I can't find any problem with it, it's okay in my dojo.

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    • #3
      alright thanks

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      • #4
        This probably depends on how your dojo does things so watch how you sempai handle it. We usually just reserve that for sensei, not sempai.

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        • #5
          It's quite normal to find and thank all those with whom you did keiko.

          Of course, advice is best sought from the sensei or instructors, but is not necesary to ask all your sempai.

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          • #6
            Probably good idea to ask to highest rank sampai or the one you keiko for longer time

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            • #7
              I think it's appropriate to thank higher ranking sempai who may have put in extra time with you or worked with you on something in particular during keiko. It doesn't necessarily have to be done in such a formal manner as with your sensei. (ie. You could speak with them while you're both standing, after they've gotten changed.)

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              • #8
                During practise we generally would thank the other. I find that alot of them nomatter what rank can have very insightfull remarks which in the end can improve your kendo. In 2 hours of practise alot happens and generally at the end everybody is tired and wants to either go have a drink or go home.

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                • #9
                  This would be a good question for your sempai as it really depends on your dojo culture. For example, in our dojo nobody is required to do this even with sensei. I think asking everyone in the dojo for advice, particularly at this early stage, is probably too much advice. You just need to practice more, and you should be getting most of your advice from sensei as all the other information may just be confusing to you.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DigitalDowntown View Post
                    I think it's appropriate to thank higher ranking sempai who may have put in extra time with you or worked with you on something in particular during keiko. It doesn't necessarily have to be done in such a formal manner as with your sensei. (ie. You could speak with them while you're both standing, after they've gotten changed.)
                    Isn't that what you do during keiko saying onegai shimase (sp check) before you rotate to the next opponent?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LarsCW View Post
                      Isn't that what you do during keiko saying onegai shimase (sp check) before you rotate to the next opponent?
                      No, it isn't.

                      "Onegaishimasu" is a polite request to practice and is often said when about to begin keiko with an aite.
                      You're thiking of "arigatougozaimasu," which is of course a polite "thank you."

                      It sounded like the OP is seeking feedback from their sempai; just bowing, saying 'thanks,' and rotating to the next guy won't provide that feedback.

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                      • #12
                        How do you fix 187 things that you are doing incorrectly?
                        The tower of Babel effect, no one can absorb so much information let alone put it all into practice.

                        So you have a Sensei who decides which is most important for YOU to work on first.
                        Yes, trust me, Sensei will get to the other 186 when #187 is not the main thing holding back your kendo now.
                        Note I did not say you have corrected #187, just it has progressed to the point that something else now takes priority,
                        #187 will come back again, when it is AGAIN the problem that is holding your kendo back.

                        It will not help if you heed 8 different Sempai each with their own idea of what you need to correct now.
                        Thank them for practicing with you, do not ask but thank them for advice given.
                        Listen to Sensei.

                        If for whatever reason you do not have confidence in Sensei's advice, find another Sensei because you are no longer listening.

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                        • #13
                          thanks guys, for all the advice it was very helpful

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