Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

kote protector and am I doing it right?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • kote protector and am I doing it right?

    Hey everyone, a couple of days ago, my sensei asked us to do and receive several kote hits in a row, I am not used to this, and so far have only gotten a couple of stray kote hits during keiko so it stung quite a bit after maybe 10 hits.
    I was looking around for a protector you wear under the kote to add extra support but I couldn't find one that didn't seem somewhat shifty >-> I am a picky buyer.(I know, probably me overreacting, but recently I've also been geeking over shiny kendo gear =w=, most of which I can't afford) So can anyone suggest a good one that you might have used?
    I might actually be receiving the strike wrong and that's why it hurt, my sensei told me how to receive a strike and I thought I was doing it correctly, but it still hurt afterwards, so maybe I wasn't really receiving correctly? can someone tell me the correct way? Is it with the flat of my wrist towards the opponent, or with the little bony area towards the opponent? Thank you

  • #2
    Even though I shipped off my bogu and we attend the same dojo, my response is: Ask sensei, even if you feel embarrassed asking, ask him anyways. Without seeing your technique in person, people will find it hard to comment on. He should be able to help you finding a kote protector as well if needed.

    -nsylver

    Comment


    • #3
      It sounds like people are hitting too hard, which would be common in Western dojo where most people are adult beginners. Here in Japan I get hit on the kote all the time and do not feel much as the adults here tend to have good tenouchi. When I started in London, my forearm did sting a lot more after practice.

      I suggest you speak to your sensei about this and see if it's more appropriate to have the whole dojo work on striking with better tenouchi and less power. A kendo cut should be a snapping slicing action rather than a chop.

      A kote protector can only ever be a temporary solution. One of the dangers of wearing one is that as you don't feel the impact of a hard hit, then you will not realize you yourself hit too hard. There's a sort of feedback loop between aite where if one is hitting too hard, there's a tendency for the other to do so as well (subconsciously to a degree we reflect the kendo we receive and we receive back the kendo we put out), though women tend to be less guilty about chopping too hard than men.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's common for it to hurt initially, but your wrist will 'harden up' and get used to it. A simple tennis wristband underneath your kote can do wonders in absorbing the sting, without hindering movement.

        I would *not* bring it up with the sensei and suggest that the 'whole dojo work on striking with better tenouchi'...that, coming from a beginner, would be outright rude.

        Comment


        • #5
          point taken. Presumably the sensei is receiving strikes so he or she will be aware of how hard people are hitting anyway. My bad.

          Comment


          • #6
            ah, that's true um Sylver? or can I call you by your first name online? o-o I'll ask about it if it comes up again, but I think sensei is focusing on coincidentally, dillon, tenouchi at the moment haha xD. Anyway, thank you guys for the advice, I think I'll just stick to the stinging for a while longer, if it really gets unbearable, i'll just have to suck it up or tell my partner to lessen the blow perhaps? I think that is interesting, the reciprocity of a hit between two aite ^w^ thank you

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tamaki :) View Post
              I think I'll just stick to the stinging for a while longer, if it really gets unbearable, i'll just have to suck it up or tell my partner to lessen the blow perhaps?
              If it really gets unbearable, something's wrong. But since you're a beginner you can't exactly criticize it. In the meantime, just buy one of these.

              Comment


              • #8
                When I was recovering from a broken wrist (soccer or footbal to the folks outside the U.S.) I used this: http://www.boguzen.com/e_p07.html and was very happy with it. I'd ship it to you but in the end I gave it to someone in our dojo.

                To the poster who said some kote may have been hard.. that's certainly possible... however I've come across people that just seem to have delicate wrists...especially as they start practicing in boug. The OP said: "...so far have only gotten a couple of stray kote hits during keiko ..." leading me to believe this is also a possible problem.

                Comment


                • #9
                  hmm both of your suggestions look very nice, but i'll have to ask my sensei and discuss it with my mother as well. I also have another minor question, if I were to go to a taikai (its a hypothetical because I'm just a beginner so i'm not sure if my sensei would even allow me to go) would I need to use a kote protector? or is it usually too difficult for people my level to get a kote? I tried to get kote on someone yesterday, but i couldn't manage it-much less a kote men, which my sensei wanted me to do ,_,-which leads me to think that maybe I won't need it for a while?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tamaki :) View Post
                    hmm both of your suggestions look very nice, but i'll have to ask my sensei and discuss it with my mother as well. I also have another minor question, if I were to go to a taikai (its a hypothetical because I'm just a beginner so i'm not sure if my sensei would even allow me to go) would I need to use a kote protector? or is it usually too difficult for people my level to get a kote? I tried to get kote on someone yesterday, but i couldn't manage it-much less a kote men, which my sensei wanted me to do ,_,-which leads me to think that maybe I won't need it for a while?
                    You are confusing two different things. You wear a protector--if at all--to help avoid wrist pain/injury. That has nothing to do with your ability to cut someone else's kote for a point during a tournament (or in practice).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've got a sorbothane one that works wonders, but Koei doesn't sell that model any more and I don't know where else to get it. I use it when I know I'm going to be receiving a lot of kote from beginners. But really any bogu supplier sells wrist pads that will work. I don't have any problem with people padding up - kendo should not hurt, or at least not routinely.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As I mentioned earlier. A standard tennis wristband will work and you can get one for a couple of bucks.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not sure if it will help, but if you buy a baby soccer shin protector for your forearm it will hide under your kote (Its small) and will provide all the protection you will ever need.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A few evenings ago, sensei at the club I was visiting, decided that we were to do 100 of whatever technique we wanted to practice... my sempai chose kote cuts; I have a wrist protector, but it was in my bogu bag, I don't normally need it anyway. I only bought it for use when up against one "loose cannon" (who has since returned to his home country) who had a habit of hitting too hard and frequently not in the target areas. Anyway at about cut #15, I was starting to feel the pain; sensei saw this and instructed me to turn my wrist as the sempai cut, so that the cut connected with my shinai near the tsuba. I had never thought to do this, its a great idea when caught in this situation.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Would that maybe not affect the practice that kakarite gets? Isn't he supposed to hit the right area?

                              When practicing with less experienced people, in our dojo motodachi is told to open kote by pointing the shinai slightly to the upper left. This enables kakarite to openly strike at the proper area in every attack. Of course, they often still miss

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X