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  • New to kendo

    Hello, everyone. I would like to ask a few questions that I want to know before I start kendo.

    1) Should I start kendo, and would it be possible for one whose family is in a bad financial situation to study in a kendo and go to a tae kwon do class (around $50 where I go, but that's not counting gas and tolls, which are high as my tae kwon do school is far from my home).

    2) I am unsure what the difference between "kendo" and "kumdo" is. Is it purely geographical, or are the techniques/stances different? I am not referring to formalities, as I understand that Japan and Korea have different customs.

    3) Does anyone know of a good kendo school located within 30 miles of Sayreville, New Jersey? For reference, that is by East Brunkswick. I saw a kumdo school in East Brunswick, but the school does not have any references, whether with a federation, and, when I was near the school, it seemed rather quiet. I was there on a Monday, a Saturday, and a Sunday, and none of them were on holidays or "slow" times. This I found slightly suspicious, as it is located in an area with many martial arts practitioners. The owner's name is Grand master Jin K. Seong. The website is http://kendoacademy.com. The fact that he refers to the school as a Kendo academy, yet mentions that it is kumdo, also seems strange.

  • #2
    Originally posted by drafonis
    Hello, everyone. I would like to ask a few questions that I want to know before I start kendo.

    1) Should I start kendo, and would it be possible for one whose family is in a bad financial situation to study in a kendo and go to a tae kwon do class (around $50 where I go, but that's not counting gas and tolls, which are high as my tae kwon do school is far from my home).

    2) I am unsure what the difference between "kendo" and "kumdo" is. Is it purely geographical, or are the techniques/stances different? I am not referring to formalities, as I understand that Japan and Korea have different customs.

    3) Does anyone know of a good kendo school located within 30 miles of Sayreville, New Jersey? For reference, that is by East Brunkswick. I saw a kumdo school in East Brunswick, but the school does not have any references, whether with a federation, and, when I was near the school, it seemed rather quiet. I was there on a Monday, a Saturday, and a Sunday, and none of them were on holidays or "slow" times. This I found slightly suspicious, as it is located in an area with many martial arts practitioners. The owner's name is Grand master Jin K. Seong. The website is http://kendoacademy.com. The fact that he refers to the school as a Kendo academy, yet mentions that it is kumdo, also seems strange.
    1.) First, find out the rates of the dojo and if they're reasonable. If they are within your budget range then it should be okay. Take into factor that you will obtain keikogi and hakama within a period of time and bogu thereafter.

    2.) Kendo and Kumdo are similar. And as you mention, they are from different countries. There are many differences within them but I haven't seen enough kumdo videos to really elaborate. (I'm basing this off of things I've read, so don't take my word on this.) As far as I've seen, they are fairly similar in waza and such.

    3.) And as for dojos in Joisey (a terrible attempt at humor...) http://www.auskf.info/mainpages/States/N_States.htm this page has the dojos recognized by the AUSKF. Check 'em out. Sorry I can't really give you the distance from where you are but I'm sorta in a rush right now. And as for the sensei, I can't really say much because to tell the truth I just don't know.

    Hope that helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      What is Kumdo??My opinion is express.

      Relations between Japanese Kendo and Korean Kumdo are the same as
      the relations between Japanese Karate and Korean Taegwondo.
      A Japanese thing is the original.
      A South Korean thing is a Japanese copy.
      Please read and compare the next two sites.

      (1)
      Problems in the Identity and Philosophy of Taegwondo
      and Their Historical Causes By: Steven D. Capener
      http://www.bstkd.com/CAPENER.1.HTM
      >The main cause of these problems is found in the history of t'aegwondo' s
      >origins. The fact that t'aegwondo was first brought into Korea from Japan
      >in the form of Japanese karate around the time of the liberation of Korea
      >from Japanese colonial rule, and the way this fact has been dealt with in
      >Korea has left many serious inconsistencies [81] in the way t'aegwondo has
      >been developed within Korea and propagated abroad.

      (2)
      WORLD TAEKWONDO HEADQUARTERS
      History of Taekwondo
      http://www.kukkiwon.or.kr/eng/tkbook...tory.asp?div=2

      I hope you reference this page.

      WHY DOES "KUMDO" TELL A LIE
      http://www.geocities.jp/bxninjin2004/index.htm
      Kendo was originated form Korea!?
      http://www.geocities.co.jp/Athlete-A...3/english.html

      I will inform you in advance, I am not a discrimination ideologist.
      I hope you know the truth.
      Please draw a conclusion by you finally reading these. I cannot compel it.

      Comment


      • #4
        i dont know what can be done about the financial issue. im unsure if there are scholarships or something of the sort in kendo. i've never heard of them before...
        it can be a real problem because the equipment tends to be quite expensive.
        i ws looking a bogu and for what i want, it will cost about 520$ and thats a somewhat cheap ensemble.
        but go to the dojo and ask the sensei what can be done.

        Comment


        • #5
          Domo arigatou gozaimasu, minna-san.

          I sent an e-mail to the sensei in charge of the Princeton Kendo Club, and I'll ask questions about financial issues and everything. From what I can tell, it won't get too expensive until I actually start using the bogu, as the area I live in, while it doesn't have any kendo clubs, has some martial arts stores that sell shinai, keikogi, and hakama for relatively cheap (probably since they're used in other styles besides kendo as well), and the club I'm considering joining is $30 USD a month plus the AUSKF membership (I'm not sure if that's standard practice in kendo, but I'll assume it is since it is an accredited dojo).

          And thank you for the explanation concerning kumdo VS kendo, muramasa-san. Basically the differences between them are the same as between karate and tae kwon do - geographical and differences in certain techniques. There was only one small error - while tae kwon do does contain many elements of karate, it contains techniques from many Korean martial arts schools as well (then again, there are no remaining martial arts that do not contain techniques from other styles).

          I decided to go with my intuition not to trust the sensei in New Brunswick, since no one knows who he is. While that is not a certain reason, I'd rather miss a chance to train with him than get ripped off. Besides, I travel 30 miles to get to my tae kwon do class - if I wasn't willing to go to the same extremes for kendo, then I should not even start. After all, the only thing that's easy is failing - and it's hardly worth the effort (a quote from someone, I don't remember who - I think it was in some book or other).

          Comment


          • #6
            well, if not now, than hopefully you can enjoy kendo in the future.

            if you ask a more experienced person on this forum such as Neil Gendzwill or jmarsten, you may be able to find out something about the sensei in new brunswick
            Last edited by piggy; 11th July 2005, 12:22 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Indeed it may be so, The Karate and taekwondo are different games.
              However,taekwondo was born from the Karate. this is fact.
              The founder of taekwondo admitted this.
              Parties concerned of taekwondo talk that the Karate arose from taekwondo.
              Moreover, the history of taekwondo is called 2,000 years.
              It is a lie to say nothing of these. But it doesn't worry to talk that it has the history of 2,000 years. Because I am not interested in taekwondo, and not interested in the lie of taekwondo similarly.
              However, I cannot keep silent if taekwondo tells a lie concerning the Karate.
              I think that this problem is not simple.
              You might not know, and the origin is not Japan in the Karate. After Okinawa had become under the rule of Japan, "karate" introduced from China to Okinawa was approved as martial arts in Japan.
              However, even if this is true, the Karate is martial arts in Japan.
              I think an important thing is to admit oneself to a fact, and to create martial
              arts.
              Though the story wandered, this trouble applies for Kumdo.
              The kendo was introduced to Korea by Japan when Korea was under the
              rule of Japan.
              However, the kendo group in Korea tried to attempt differentiating by daring to pronounce the Chinese character(kanji) of kendo by the Korea type.
              However, the protector, the bamboo sword, and the rule, etc. used are the same as the
              kendo in Japan. Though it is natural.
              However, please look at the web page etc. of the kendo group in Korea. They are doing a similar insistence just like taekwondo. That is, Kumdo of Korea is an origin of the kendo in Japan.
              I can not understand the intention of Korea that insists on such a thing. Because it is a
              problem in their very delicate part.
              However, I cannot be becoming silent for the lie of such Kumdo. I cannot be without saying something. Why it is easy.
              It is because the history and the tradition that our ancestor built up are denied. It steps and it is crushed.
              I wonder might be sad ..so...

              I am not to deny Kumdo. It is a natural act that makes a new thing from an existing thing, and is taken as a right.
              But, it is a crime that the lie is added to the history and the tradition because of the nation and pride.
              I hope to develop based on recognition that Kumdo is correct.

              My sentences became long. What you wanted to learn might have been an irrelevant thing.
              My wanting to advise is that there are various groups in Kumdo.
              There are a lot of groups in Kumdo. The kendo is roughly one.
              If Kumdo is chosen, it is necessary to choose KKA (大韓剣道会). This group belongs to official recognition to the South Korea government, and IKF (biggest mechanism that Japan is generalizing).
              Many are commercial principles, and each group is conflicting though other Kumdo groups exist, too.
              However, the most important thing is to see by your eyes and to confirm it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by piggy
                i dont know what can be done about the financial issue. im unsure if there are scholarships or something of the sort in kendo. i've never heard of them before...
                it can be a real problem because the equipment tends to be quite expensive.
                i ws looking a bogu and for what i want, it will cost about 520$ and thats a somewhat cheap ensemble.
                but go to the dojo and ask the sensei what can be done.

                Depending on the dojo, your sensei may even have spare a bogu that you can borrow until you can afford to purchase your own. Many of the beginners at my dojo borrow bogu from our sensei until they are sure they want to invest in one themselves.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Muramasa,

                  By founder of Taekwondo, I assume you mean General Choi? Its true, the name Taekwondo didnt even exist until 1952 or so, when General Choi and a group of ROK Army officers decided to formalize Taekyun and adopted the name. Like many of ROK Army officers of the time, Choi and his subordinates were trained by the Japanese military during the occupation and, yes, trained in karate. They essentially borrowed the uniform, the belt system, and many of the terminology. When I took Taekwondo in the 60s in Korea, it was common to hear a lot of Japanese words in the dojang. Steven Capener is essentially correct in his writing. Having said that, to say the Taekwondo is a copy of karate is just plain ignorant, and does make you sound like a discriminating ideologue. FYI - taekyun looks more like kungfu than present day Taekwondo, and its roots can be traced back several thousand years. It most certainly came to Korea from China. Many of its movements are very fluid and dance-like.

                  As for kumdo or kendo, the first time the two characters (劍道) show up together is in China. Of course, they are not talking about the modern kumdo or kendo, which is a pretty recent development. Clearly, sword art was recognized as a separate martial art with distinct philosophies and styles and including both the physical and the mental aspects, thousands of years ago. And as the way of the sword spread, it took on local flavors and the sword itself underwent changes, as the sword evolved from double-edged to single-edge, curved design. Chinese knew of the single edge, curved sword at least by 5th century, and Koreans and Japanese were also using it.

                  Anyway, to get back to your point, I wouldnt pay any attention to any one saying that 劍道 originated in Korea or Japan. The current sport-ification of this noble, killing art, what we call kumo/kendo today, did develop in Japan. They developed the bamboo swords (shinai) and the protection (bogu), allowing mass participation and practicing without the danger of injuries.

                  The article and the website, WHY DOES "KUMDO" TELL A LIE, http://www.geocities.jp/bxninjin2004/index.htm seems like an anti-Kumdo propaganda written by some Japanese individual (with a huge axe to grind), and contains many factual errors. It is not the official position of the All Japan Kumdo Federation (全日本剣道連盟). There are several 劍道 styles in Korea, and some are truly indigenous to Korea. The one officially sanctioned by the Korean Kumdo Association (www.kumdo.org), is the same as kendo, and in fact, the Korean Kumdo Association is a member in good standing of the All Japan Kendo Association. There are a lot of exchanges between to the two countries, and the relationship is quite good. These are the guys who compete at the WKC, and the team members from both countries are good friends with each other (they run into each other all the time in competitions) and train together periodically.

                  You seem to feel its very important to establish national origin of Taekwondo and Kumdo/Kendo. If you are that interested, you should do more substantial research (besides web surfing and looking at questionable sites).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by drafonis
                    Hello, everyone. I would like to ask a few questions that I want to know before I start kendo.
                    Jersey? For reference, that is by East Brunkswick. I saw a kumdo school in East Brunswick, but the school does not have any references, whether with a federation, and, when I was near the school, it seemed rather quiet. I was there on a Monday, a Saturday, and a Sunday, and none of them were on holidays or "slow" times. This I found slightly suspicious, as it is located in an area with many martial arts practitioners. The owner's name is Grand master Jin K. Seong. The website is http://kendoacademy.com. The fact that he refers to the school as a Kendo academy, yet mentions that it is kumdo, also seems strange.
                    I don't know much about kendoacademy, but I have practised with Grandmaster Jin K Seong when he came visiting here at TAMU. In fact, our instructor was his student in Korea. You can find photographs of our session here: http://www.shinken.net/kendo/4_2004_CS.html.

                    I think you will realize that the kumdo he does (and we do) is more-or-less the same mainstream kendo.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I know

                      I know the school you are talking about, I personally went there and am hoping to start training after i get my blackbelt in teakwondo and then begin. Personally I think that you should finish (or start) teakwondo to learn how to control your body well, and then use the sword as an extension of your arm. Thats what I'm going to do. As money goes, well another reason I would finish one and then do another, so that the whole load mightnot be at once. Along with the information overdose (forms, sparring segments and such). That's all i got for now.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Shade View Post
                        I know the school you are talking about, I personally went there and am hoping to start training after i get my blackbelt in teakwondo and then begin. Personally I think that you should finish (or start) teakwondo to learn how to control your body well, and then use the sword as an extension of your arm. Thats what I'm going to do. As money goes, well another reason I would finish one and then do another, so that the whole load mightnot be at once. Along with the information overdose (forms, sparring segments and such). That's all i got for now.
                        You plan to finish a martial art? Good luck with that.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In most TKD dojang that I've seen, 1st dan is 2 or 3 years of training, similar to kendo 1st dan. So it's a beginner's rank, hardly "finishing" anything.

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