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  • Hiroshima & Nagasaki

    6. August 1945, 8:16 USA Bomber B-29 Enola Gay (group commander Paul Tibbets named the bomber after his mothers) dropped the first atomic bomb (nicknamed Little Boy) on Hiroshima. The citizens spelt. 100.000 people died.

    9. August 1945 the second atomic bomb destroyed 40.000 lives.

    Today is the 59. Anniversary when the humanity realised the deadly power of the nuclear weapon. Its a very sad and painful day, but we have to remember once more no war pays off.


    Historia vitae magistra. (-> Translation: History is a teacher for life.)

    History doesnt teach us, it only reminds what mankind has done. (But its sad and frightening that such anniversaries are increasing.) People dont learn from their mistakes, because if they would, there wouldnt be so much sorrow, pain and dead in this word.

    Once Trinity proved that the atomic bomb worked, men discovered reasons to use it. Richard Rhodes, (The Making of Atomic Bomb)

    Serenity

  • #2
    Originally posted by Serenity
    6. August 1945, 8:16 USA Bomber B-29 Enola Gay (group commander Paul Tibbets named the bomber after his mothers) dropped the first atomic bomb (nicknamed Little Boy) on Hiroshima. The citizens spelt. 100.000 people died.

    9. August 1945 the second atomic bomb destroyed 40.000 lives.

    Today is the 59. Anniversary when the humanity realised the deadly power of the nuclear weapon. Its a very sad and painful day, but we have to remember once more no war pays off.


    Historia vitae magistra. (-> Translation: History is a teacher for life.)

    History doesnt teach us, it only reminds what mankind has done. (But its sad and frightening that such anniversaries are increasing.) People dont learn from their mistakes, because if they would, there wouldnt be so much sorrow, pain and dead in this word.

    Once Trinity proved that the atomic bomb worked, men discovered reasons to use it. Richard Rhodes, (The Making of Atomic Bomb)

    Serenity
    Thanks for ruining my day!

    Comment


    • #3
      Everything has a chain reaction. If the US didn't bomb Japan, the war would have continued longer.
      This crap about learning from history seems to imply that the Americans didn't learn from history. It is obvious that Japan didn't care to learn from history. Japan was the country that chose to expand its empire through war and aggression. It made the first move. Don't forget that.

      Comment


      • #4
        Still...it's a good thing to remember the dead on all sides. This is as good a day for that as any.
        Last edited by Paikea; 7th August 2004, 03:30 AM. Reason: Sr. Mary Grammar

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Paikea
          Still...it's a good thing to remember the dead on all sides. This is as good a day for that as any.
          well said, and i especially love seeing all the garlands of cranes at the Peace Park. It's always so beautiful.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Paikea
            Still...it's a good thing to remember the dead on all sides. This is as good a day for that as any.
            epecially considering how many of those were draftees and civilians. Beleive it or not, not all nazi soldiers were supportive of the reich, or war criminals.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by D'Artagnan
              Thanks for ruining my day!
              Sorry, that wasnt my attention. Its a historical fact and from time to time it has to be mentioned. History is a part of our lives and should not be a taboo topic. The people should discus about everything that happened in the past, maybe conversation could prevent conflict situations.

              ... But the media around the word reported about the speech of Hiroshimas mayor Akiba-sama ...

              Serenity

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by indigo0086
                epecially considering how many of those were draftees and civilians. Beleive it or not, not all nazi soldiers were supportive of the reich, or war criminals.
                This is so true. Many people consider every German to be a Nazi. But the common people didnt have any other choice. If they didnt obey, they were executed.


                My grandfather was in the German army during the WW II. With only 17 years he was forced to go into the army he fought in Rusia. This war marked him for his whole life, not only him, a lot of people were psychically destroyed for the whole life.

                Serenity

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Serenity
                  [size=3][font=Times New Roman]This is so true. Many people consider every German to be a Nazi
                  well, that's stretching it. Maybe back then, but now I think most think the opposite. America probably has more nazis than germany does now

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hai_hai
                    Everything has a chain reaction. If the US didn't bomb Japan, the war would have continued longer.
                    This crap about learning from history seems to imply that the Americans didn't learn from history. It is obvious that Japan didn't care to learn from history. Japan was the country that chose to expand its empire through war and aggression. It made the first move. Don't forget that.
                    This cannot justify the terror of dropping radioactive substances on to women and children. Slaying civilians can never make you a hero. I am Chinese but I don't think all the Japanese should die.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not many people can think of alternates to dropping a bomb. It may not be justified, it may not have made anyone a hero, but do you think america or japan would be the same if it had not? Japan probably would have been drafted out of existence.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mingshi
                        This cannot justify the terror of dropping radioactive substances on to women and children. Slaying civilians can never make you a hero. I am Chinese but I don't think all the Japanese should die.
                        You let him get to you again...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          True, killing civilians, and innocents is definatly not a good way to handl combatant situations. Like all the others, I have to agree that if it had not been for the manhatten project, and the two atomic bombs, both america, and jepan would have had 10 fold the damage, in lives taken, and other economical side effects of war. Dropping the atomic bombs forced the emperor to surrender, and save thousands of other japanese. I remember reading the account of a United States marine, in the island hopping stages of WW2 of how each and every Japanese soldier would die hands down, and never accept surrender, so without the emperor's surrender, the end would have been alot more painful for both sides. To the History bit- Humans in my opinion can not reach a peacful state, there is always fighting, be it for power, revenge, an idea. Humans as individuals will always have individual thaughts, and thaughts quite often go against others individual ideals, thaugt processes and beleifs.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Good post Caleb.

                            Its human nature unfortunatley, no matter what your station in life everyone strives for more, but we just make ripples were as the big guns in the goverment, the rich the powerfull, they make the waves that crush nations and kill civilians.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Unit 731
                              http://www.aiipowmia.com/731/731mnu.html

                              Deadly Knowledge

                              Factories of Death: Japanese Biological Warfare,
                              1932-45, and the American Coverup
                              By Sheldon H. Harris
                              Routledge
                              Decades before the Aum Shinri Kyo religious sect began gassing subways, the Japanese government funded another horror: the world's most brutal biological warfare (BW) experiments on human subjects. According to writer Sheldon Harris, all of this was delicately covered up for years by the United States in return for the valuable test data.

                              From the time Japan occupied all of Manchuria in 1931-1932 until the 1945 surrender to Allied forces, the Manchurian countryside became pockmarked with ugly scientific buildings known to locals only as "lumber mills," surrounded by moats and patrolled by aircraft. In these macabre fortresses, deadly microbes - such as anthrax, typhoid, cholera, and dysentery - were tested on live human subjects, who were either kidnapped from neighboring villages or shipped in via POW boats. Once the subjects - or "material" - had exhausted their usefulness and died, the corpses were cremated on-site or dumped in mass graves. Occasionally a nearby town was surreptitiously infected with plague germs. After inhabitants showed terminal symptoms, the test was deemed successful, and the community burned to destroy all evidence.

                              Sheldon Harris has spent the past 10 years compiling the definitive tome on the subject. One chilling account describes an outdoor test performed on Chinese prisoners:

                              "The subjects were bound to stakes some 10 to 20 meters away from a shrapnel bomb that was loaded with gas gangrene. The object was not to kill the men by exploding the bomb, but to test the effectiveness of gas gangrene as a BW weapon in below zero temperatures. Consequently, 'their heads and backs were protected with special metal shields and thick quilted blankets, but their legs and buttocks were left unprotected.' Using a remote-control device, the researchers exploded the bomb, and 'the shrapnel, bearing gas gangrene germs, scattered all over the spot where the experimentees were bound. All the experimentees were wounded in the legs or buttocks, and seven days later they died in great torment.'"

                              According to Harris's exhaustive research, three principal leaders of the BW program - Ishii Shiro, Kitano Masaji, and Wakamatsu Yujiro - were responsible for camps with ominously nondescript names like Unit 731 or Unit Ei1644. Once the war ended, all three men escaped prosecution. United States investigators reportedly cut a deal with them, promising complete immunity in exchange for their data, which was hidden from the War Crimes Tribunal and confined solely to the intelligence community. Thus, when the trials ended in 1948, Soviet and United States intelligence agents swarmed over Japan in a Cold War panic, hurriedly interviewing all known participants. The same questions were on all of their minds:

                              How did the Japanese do it? What were the results?

                              The American coverup was kept secret until a 1981 article in the "Bulletin of Atomic Scientists" by John W. Powell Jr., which eventually led to investigative segments on 60 Minutes and 20/20. Even today, 50 years after the Japanese death factories, United States intelligence still refuses to make public certain related information.

                              Harris's conclusion is open-ended. The reader is invited to ponder: What does the government have to hide? If the United States claims its own BW experiments ended in 1945, why were Persian Gulf soldiers inoculated with unproven vaccines, including anthrax, and why are 67 percent of their children born with severe illnesses or birth defects? When Factories of Death starts raising questions, they reach uncomfortably close to home.

                              By Jack Boulware

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