Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ok, them blisters

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ok, them blisters

    What's your favourite method of dealing with them?. (apart from correction your footwork ).
    For minor/not so deep ones, I remove the skin and if necesarry use one of those blister-bandaids for a day or 2.
    For deeper ones, I'll puncture them with a needle if necesarry and leave them.
    I only use tabi/sole-protectors if it's too painful to practice otherwise. (I've never found a method of taping it up, without tearing the tape of during practice.)


    Jakob

  • #2
    Well, it has been a while since I don't have any blisters, but at the time, I used to do more or less the same that you do, ripping off the skin and such.

    Comment


    • #3
      I only got the one blister from kendo and it ripped off during practice and never got another one but still loads of time
      But I got loads in the army so the soles of my feet are quite tuff now, but what I used to do was leave the small ones they normally went away or burst after a day, but deep ones I would cut them out with my khukui then put some antiseptic cream on then a plaster or black n nasty

      Comment


      • #4
        A taping method that doesn't come off during keiko!

        1) Use athletic tape, wrap three times around the balls of your left foot. Make sure you end the tape on the top of your foot. This wrap shouldn't be so tight that you cannot easily flex your toes.

        2) Cut strips of athletic tape about 4-5cm long. Rip them in half lengthwise and put one between each toe, with the adhesive sticking to the athletic tape already on your foot.

        3) Wrap full-width athletic tape around 3 more times, covering the ends of the half-width strips and ending the tape at the top. Again, this should not be too tight.

        If you have an open blister, it is advisable to put a bandaid or that yellow athletic sponge (made by Johnson&Johnson) over the blister first, before employing this taping method.

        Comment


        • #5
          Damn cklin, that's a mummy fighting kendo

          Comment


          • #6
            We need your blisters!

            Issue number 4 of the magazine will feature blisters in the Kendo Clinic.

            We're looking for some really serious blister photos, so if anyone's got any, send 'em on in!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Cklin & alexpollijr: alternatively, take strips of athletic tape, take a cigarette lighter and gently burn the plastic on the adhesive side so it becomes even stickier than normal. Put them on this way, and they'll stick much better. You save tape, too, since you won't need to "mummify" your entire foot as you had suggested.

              And yes, the spongy material really helps; otherwise if you're taping over a wound, it really defeats the point without the padding underneath.

              Comment


              • #8
                funny thing this topic came up.

                I was having practice today and and suddenly
                tissue from my left big toe just ripped right off!!

                I was bleeding and bleeding.
                Its the first time something like this happened to my toe.
                Anyhow, its pretty bad and Im thinkin about staying off it
                for a day so Ill have to miss tomorrows practice.

                Anyhow, if you have blisters and the tissue is still in tact,
                DONT use bandaids b4 taping cus the tape actually needs
                to STICK to where the blister is in order to keep the tissue
                from being smeared off.

                And uh, Im told that the blisters on your hands dont ever go away.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sup: you mean skin from your toe ripped off, right? I find it difficult to imagine an actual chunk of tissue/flesh coming off during practice... ouch.

                  I think you're right, blisters on the hands just don't seem to go away...as long as you're still practicing regularly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by olaf
                    Sup: you mean skin from your toe ripped off, right? I find it difficult to imagine an actual chunk of tissue/flesh coming off during practice...
                    Hahaha. well I guess it's skin then!
                    Anyhow, I was just trying to say that it wasnt the skin from
                    a blister that ripped. I had no blisters on my feet and suddenly
                    the SKIN pealed off!! arrrggghhhhh

                    And uh.. doesnt your right heal hurt? I think I got bruises on
                    mine. I mean the floor at my dojang is so darn hard.


                    I think I tried too hard today. Its been quite sometime since
                    I last practiced.


                    Well olaf, I hope I didnt scare ya big guy!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bruised right heel... those are the worst. Takes some time to heal up. If the floor is hard there isn't much you can do, other than to get a really good heel pad. Could also be that you are hitting the floor first with your heel when doing fumikomi.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sup: it's good to know you only lost some skin. Losing a chunk of foot isn't exactly good.

                        Hard floors - use a heel pad. If you really need you can use a Kendo heel pad, and then put on a small-sized sports elbow pad around the hell pad...take some athletic tape, and secure the two in place.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think I tried too hard today. Its been quite sometime since
                          Remember, it's always a bad idea to do that. Start slow and work up. Of course, I've never been able to follow that advice myself. But it is still good advice.

                          Sup and Jschmidt,

                          Taping in kendo has never worked for me. It always comes off during practice.

                          Consider using (the original, non-toxic) superglue on the big stuff. It sounds gross but it works great. In granite big wall climbing we run into lacerations, big chunks of flesh getting ripped off your fingertips and popped blisters all the time. Superglue repairs them well and can also be used to buildup fake calluses. Superglue was actually invented for a similar purpose as a replacement for sutures inside the body during sugery (to obviate the need to take the stitches out later). That's why it sticks your fingers together so well. It is non-toxic and ultimately dissolves away. Instead of ripping the skin/blister cover off, glue it solidly back down and you will create a callus.

                          Personally, I'd stay away from the duct tape, especially on an open (bleeding) wound, unless it was the only choice. As a chemical engineer, I know that there is some really nasty stuff in the adhesive on duct tape. It shouldn't kill you (no promises), but it is guaranteed not to do you any good.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "non-toxic superglue" stuff? Is that really necessary? Trust me - try burning the tape beforehand. Just enough to partially melt the adhesive. It works great.

                            Duck-tape is certainly a no-no. Not even for re-attaching severed appendages.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Duck-tape is certainly a no-no. Not even for re-attaching severed appendages.
                              Hmmm.... I guess now duct tape can't be used for two things: taping ducts (the adhesive qualities of duct tape degrade at low temperature) and for surgery.

                              Using duct tape is a bad idea. The residue may get on the floor and it is a pain to clean if you don't have any solvents around.
                              Last edited by stakenaka; 30th July 2002, 04:06 AM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X