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  • #16
    eh? tou?

    The funniest kiai i ever heard (and still hear on a regular basis) is "yush" (sounds like 'youshe'). it's a sound generally made by japanese males when they do such momentous things as getting up from their desks, going to fetch their lunches, or climbing stairs... it's a ubiquitous japanese expression with no meaning. it is like an announcement: "i'm about to do something now". it sounds so silly as a kiai. the first time i heard it, i laughed too hard.

    the other funny one is the 'eh' 'tou' combo. One of the guys i train with starts every exercise or match with 'eh?', then his striking kiai is 'tou'.It doesn't sound funny typed out, but i guess you have to hear it.

    c

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    • #17
      I usually go...
      "ku" (no meaning for me) then "sak!" sounds like sark or suck...actually its the chinese/cantonese word for "kill". Watch cantonese movies and you will hear them say it.


      Sounds a bit also like Kusok, which is just...well...sh1t...

      I also on occasion scold "Tut! Tut! Tut!" usually moving forward and smacking down on my opponent's shinai in conjunction with each call. It sorta works in driving back some opponents and helps me break their center.

      (That one I read somewhere in Musashi's book of five rings and decided to try it out.)

      Meng

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      • #18
        Funny you said, my sensei frequently says 'yoush' but I never figured out what was that. Thank you for the enlightenment.

        As for 'Ehhh To', I do know a Nipo-Brazilian who screams exactly like that.

        I've herd so many kiai so far that I don't find anything weird anymore.

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        • #19
          Posted by Confound

          The funniest kiai i ever heard (and still hear on a regular basis) is "yush" (sounds like 'youshe'). it's a sound generally made by japanese males when they do such momentous things as getting up from their desks, going to fetch their lunches, or climbing stairs... it's a ubiquitous japanese expression with no meaning. it is like an announcement: "i'm about to do something now". it sounds so silly as a kiai. the first time i heard it, i laughed too hard.
          What about:

          "O ra" I hear this one heaps.

          or

          "gnnoookk" sorta sounds like someone saying "knock" but with a cold. One of my Japanese Uni mates said this at the start of every sentence.

          Meng

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          • #20
            ne?

            gnook? never heard that one. could be regional, like youshu.

            what about ne? every heard that one?

            c

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            • #21
              Funniest Kiai I've heard so far would have to be a couple of guys from our club. The first (his names Tim) sounds like Popeye laughing (Ah-ga-ga-ga-ga-ga). The second (Chris) likes to perform Bird calls from time to time. This, of course, isn't the kiai when they call out men or kote etcc...

              We also have the usual Men-saaa, Men-shaaa, menmenmenmen.

              I have a VERY high pitched kiai compared to my normal voice. Some have commented that i sound like some kind of spastic woman on crack, but it works for me!

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              • #22
                There's a guy at our dojo that goes something like "Hassayyyyy!" - I thought this was his particular thing, until I heard someone at another dojo do it too. Is it an established (Karate?) thing or something?

                <rei>

                Dave

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                • #23
                  I don't know if it's karate, but I have heard kiai that sound similar.

                  c

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                  • #24
                    At a dojo I used to train at, there was a young guy whose kiai was 'YADAAAAAAAA'. You were guaranteed a chuckle from one or more of the Japanese-speaking kendoka every time he let it rip. Funny stuff.

                    Ares2907

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                    • #25
                      my kiai is men saaaaaaaaa
                      kote saaaaaaaaaaa

                      why?!

                      steve your kiai( if i'm not mistaken of the person i'm talking to )sounds like someone who is laughing.
                      Sounded like "hehehheehe"

                      During keiko against you I thought you were making fun at me
                      haha

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                      • #26
                        Re: eh? tou?

                        Originally posted by Confound
                        it's a ubiquitous japanese expression with no meaning. it is like an announcement: "i'm about to do something now". it sounds so silly as a kiai. the first time i heard it, i laughed too hard.
                        Far from having no meaning, it means "well...", "right...", "OK..", at least according to the dictionary, but you'd probably translate it in this context as "let's go!", and I use it a bit myself when encouraging kids in it's other meaning of good, well done.

                        The best kiai story I heard was at the Kyoto Taikai, when one sensei starts with "irasshai!" (welcome!) The other sensei promptly responded by tsuki-ing him back!

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                        • #27
                          My Kiai is "Wayo!" it's the polite form of the verb "come" in Korean. So essentially, I'm politely saying "come on!"

                          I guess in the Japanese it would be "kimasu" as opposed to "koi!"

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                          • #28
                            Confound,

                            "ne" is Korean for "yes".

                            Also, why do you transliterate all your Japanese "o" endings with a "u"? For example, you write "kendo" as "kendou" and "do" and "dou". I'm not sure that's right. The pronunciation doesn't have a rising "u" sound at the end. It's a flat "o" sound. I think you mean "eh to" or maybe "eh toh", not "eh tou". Am I wrong?

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                            • #29
                              Achilles: as I understand it, there are several internationally accepted methods of romanizing Japanese sounds.

                              If you look at the English naming convention used for Japanese subway station names, that is one method - it uses the standard English alphabet, with bars and dots above some letters to denote short/long sounds, etc. The other common method uses only standard English alphabet letters, but not the bars, dots, etc.

                              "Kendo", using this latter method, would be spelt "kendou". Likewise, "bougu", "dou", etc. Using the former method, one would actually write "kendo" with a bar over the "o", to denote the long sound. Writing the word simply as "kendo" actually conforms to none of the conventions, though for the sake of simplicity, it is widely used.

                              Try using a Japanese word processor with an English keyboard using the standard input methods; typing in "kendo" will not produce anything while "kendou" will.

                              Japanese speakers, correct me if I'm wrong.

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                              • #30
                                one time at a tournament i kiaied "die" on accident...most embarassing...I just make a loud sound from my gut and some times there are some constanents(sp) in front...

                                oh wellz...

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