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  • kakarikeiko and keiko ?

    I recently switched schools, which means i'm practicing with a different kendou club. The problem is, this club is very unskilled, mostly because they haven't had a teacher supervising the club who actually studied kendou for many, many years. Thus, the students are so poor that when I arrived, the old sensei who comes in from outside the school to teach, appointed me 'assistnt sensei'. This is a really weird situation, since at my last school I wasn't even IN the budokan hierarchy, I was a non-entity.

    This puts me in a strange situation where i have to do keiko and kakarikeiko, but as the receiver rather than the striker. This is unfamiliar to me, but I want to learn to do it well.

    Long winded explanations aside, I need some tips on kakarikeiko and keiko. (unusual but useful suburi for low levels would be useful too, they're doing really bizarre stuff now that honestly doesn't look very useful.)

    c

  • #2
    I usually serve as motodachi for shushinsha and mudansha.
    In uchikomi geiko, I use to open the target an instant before the partner reaches toma no maai, so he has time to do correct kihon waza (ookiku). For kakari geiko, keep the chudan no kamae steady and wait for the partner to break it with seme. You may lower or raise a little the kensen to allow different kinds of harai and uchiotoshi waza. If the partner is sloppy or out of guard/concentrarion, moto strikes as well, and blocks poor cuts.

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    • #3
      IMO, the most important things in being motodachi for kakarigeiko/uchikomigeiko are:

      (1) getting out of the way quickly;
      (2) re-establishing toma quickly after receiving a strike

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: kakarikeiko and keiko ?

        Originally posted by Confound
        I recently switched schools,
        So you finally decided to leave your dojo afterall...lol, i guess it was for the best then, or was it for some other reason? Anyhoo, your new dojo sounds quite funny...on the subject of kakarikeiko, i can't really assist you on that because i am of the cocroache class meaning i am a total begginer...

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        • #5
          posted by Kenshin

          Anyhoo, your new dojo sounds quite funny...on the subject of kakarikeiko, i can't really assist you on that because i am of the cocroache class meaning i am a total begginer..
          Heh...yeah...sounds like some feelgood/mighty ducks/Waterboy type movie script. You know, helpless team, gets new coach to bring them to shape...heh

          Total Beginner, eh?

          Should we call you Kenshin or Dr Gokiburi?

          Hee Hee
          Meng

          Comment


          • #6
            I observed a good instructor say of kakarigeiko:

            -go as fast as you can, but not so fast that your technique sucks

            -go as soon as you see the opening

            -if your receiver gets out of the way, GO THROUGH, but if you feel the least bit of resistance, stop, tsuba-zerai, and cut backwards quickly and cleanly. Then go again.

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            • #7
              Re: kakarikeiko and keiko ?

              Originally posted by Confound
              ...they're doing really bizarre stuff now that honestly doesn't look very useful.
              Do tell us more about the kimyoona stuff. Well, at least I'm interested

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              • #8
                Re: posted by Kenshin

                Originally posted by KhawMengLee


                Should we call you Kenshin or Dr Gokiburi?

                Hee Hee
                Meng
                OUCH! Dr. Gokuburi! That's Gokuburi-sensei to you. At my old school, the kids used to call me that.

                I have changed schools, but I still go back to the old budokan for kendou aikokai (night class), sometimes 2 times a week.

                this is not some kind of mighty ducks story. I suck, honestly. i'm only ikkyu, and i've only studied for a year, that's why i'm concerned about being a good motodachi, and giving students the best training that I am able to give. They have no sensei, and the one old man who comes in to teach only drops in occasionally. Though I'm not an expert, i owe it to them to do the best that I can, with my pitiful skills.

                c

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Re: posted by Kenshin

                  Originally posted by Confound


                  I suck, honestly. i'm only ikkyu, and i've only studied for a year, that's why i'm concerned about being a good motodachi, and giving students the best training that I am able to give. They have no sensei, and the one old man who comes in to teach only drops in occasionally. Though I'm not an expert, i owe it to them to do the best that I can, with my pitiful skills.

                  c
                  Don't be so hard on yourself, it will be a nice experience for you to be teaching others already, i think if there is a kendo sensai that posts in these forums, what they probably would post in the "whats the best things about kendo" post is that, to teach and give others the ability to experience kendo, and to be part of their mental development for life, in which they will have gained through the process of learning and applying the concepts of kendo into their everyday lives...well lets hope so anyway. so keep at it, and be more optomistic about it, that way it will also translate through your teaching. Also considering all the bad that you have experienced in your life at the moment, i guess this is the best opportunity for you to correct those many things that keep bugging you...

                  P.S who is this Dr. Gokuburi, sorry but we cocroache folk are very uncultured...

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                  • #10
                    bugs

                    A gokiburi is a cockroach

                    c

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: bugs

                      Originally posted by Confound
                      A gokiburi is a cockroach

                      c
                      ....lol

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re:Kenshin

                        Hey, Mr Gokiburi! (aka. Kenshin) What are you still doing here?! I saw you in my friend's kitchen last night! Hmmnnn...obviously you survived the good stomping I gave you.

                        Drat! Next time I use Bug Spray!

                        Heh

                        Meng

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Re:Kenshin

                          Originally posted by KhawMengLee


                          Drat! Next time I use Bug Spray!

                          You'll have to try harder than that if you really want to get rid of me...i'm an unkillable cockroach, well at least i like to think of it that way.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cklin
                            IMO, the most important things in being motodachi for kakarigeiko/uchikomigeiko are:

                            (1) getting out of the way quickly;
                            (2) re-establishing toma quickly after receiving a strike
                            That's the best advice I've seen yet.

                            However, what do you do when you've presented a VERY clear opening, but your partner isn't seeing it? When my body is bent forward at about 15 to 25 degrees, and my shinai is somewhat lowered, you'd think the girl would hit mem, but she tries to hit dou?! Of all things.

                            What are you supposed to do when a student repeatedly screws up an obvious waza? When I make mistakes in the other budokan, my sempai usual gives me one more run at it, and if i miss it again, he'll call it out for me (but that's rare, and it's usually not single stroke waza i'm missing). i'm worried that the openings i'm presenting are either not clear, or they're too difficult.

                            I guess it's mostly trial and error isn't it...

                            c

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Confound, if they can't take a hint, make it clear. Present the same opening, again and again and again, until they recognise it and cut correctly. Don't accept any other cuts (ie, block them). Make them do the same cut at least 4-5 times. You really don't have to tell them anythting. Through repetition, they'll quickly understand what is required.

                              I'm sure you would have had some experience when the sensei has made you do kakarigeiko and wont let you stop until you do that large men that they wanted. Next time you square up to them, you know what they want. Use the same principle with your students.

                              Obviously, if they have no idea to start with, you will need to explain what cut they should do with which opening. That done, they have no excuse.

                              Hope this helps.

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