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  • #16
    Originally posted by AlexM

    [snippage]
    Two important points seem to be:
    1) Watch the fight as if you "are" the opposing fighters and try to sense the flow of a match (helps in atticipating what will happen and not get caught "sleeping").
    2) If you make a call be ready to justify your decision because it will be questionned (not right away but later on).

    Hmm, not sure that I agree with these. Can you explain what you mean by 'as if you are the opposing fighters' ? When judging, I try to do the 'looking at the far mountain' thing - there are a lot of things to take into account -
    You are not just a single judge that happens to be in the company of another two. You need to work as a team in controlling the match. Besides looking for valid cuts, you must also be aware of your position in relation to the other shinpan, your position in relation to the competitors as well as watching for things such as safety hazards and foul play. I think it's important to remain as detatched as possible from the play so that you are free to make decisions instantly.

    As for your second point, unless you are at a venue that is specifically teaching you how to shinpan, imho, you do not need to justify your decision to anyone. ever. If they disagree with the decision you made, too bad. You were the shinpan, they were not. It's that simple. People make mistakes, even at the highest level, however the nature of kendo shiai means that once a decision is made, it is final, right or wrong. That is where it should be left.
    I do not apologise for 'mistakes' that I make when judging, nor have I ever been asked to justify them. I have also been on the receiving end of some harsh decisions, I'm sure everyone has. Nonetheless, unless you have proof that a judge is biased against you, you have to let it go.
    My other comment on judging is - respect your own judgement. The thing I hate more than anything when judging, is someone that puts his flag up because one of the other judges do. Don't be a follower - it shows and no one respects it.

    just my $0.02 worth.

    Comment


    • #17
      To clarify:

      I have to say that I (politely) disagree with your philosophy of remaining somewhat distant from the competition. I think being able to watch and anticipate what might come next can certainly help in making the right call. There is a rythm and momentum to a shiai, the shimpan's best bet to make the right call is to be able to follow that rythm. Understanding how the opponents are fighting each other and what each one is trying to do seems important to judging. It's almost like fighting two fights at once. This all sounds very imprecise but I have difficulty expressing this kind of a concept. Besides, if I'm wrong then I've got plenty of time to change my mind (not bloody likely though).

      As to having to back up a refereeing decision I have to say that your attitude disapoints me. People DO question desicions and answering them with silence seems ridiculous to me. After all, it's difficult to learn if you can't know what you did wrong.

      I'm not implying that shinpan should become a new breed of spineless jellyfish (do any jellyfish actually have spines?). A decision is a decision end of story but one must be willing to back up a desicion with somekind of justification (e.g. "your kote was good but lacked zanshin" or "your kote was good but the opponent hit men at the same time"). I have very little tournament experience but I can already notice that flags don't all go up at the same time: One flag goes up only to be followed by the other two for no good reason (lot's of blow calls this way). You are absolutely right that shinpan should stick to their impressions of what happened and not follow along because they were "sleeping" during the match (happens more often than one might think according to my sensei).

      Of course, one of the beautiful things about kendo is it's amateur nature and the fact that a blown call really isn't the end if the world for those involved (could you imagine the kind of controversies that would take place if this were an olympic sport?).

      Comment


      • #18
        hmm alex

        i think trying to anticipate is not the best idea, reason is if there is two oponents and there is one you know better than the other one, you know his kendo and the way he is going to react in certain situation, as for the other kendoka you don't really know what he can do. If you try too much to anticipate and being into the action, at that time you can be surprised by a hit of the person you didn't know or couldn't anticipate, thus you won't give a point.


        But i'm a really bad shinpan and I don't really know what the hell i'm talking about.

        Comment


        • #19
          I never "shinpaned", so I have a question: For how long were you guys praticing kendo when you were shipan for the first time?

          Comment


          • #20
            Normaly I think people have to be at least 3rd dan to judge in tournament? not sure.

            I just did shinpan a couple of time for shiai in our dojo during practice. Nothing serious, just to make us realise it isn't that easy!!

            been doing kendo for 2 years

            Comment


            • #21
              Only been doing kendo for about a year. But this was internal to the dojo, no big deal really and it was all in good fun. For the record I have obviously never shinpaned in anything close to a tournament (crowd laughs in amusement).
              You should try it out for yourself: it's loads of fun to hand out hansoku for no apparent reason or suddenly go blind when there's an ippon (especially to those dojo mates who have earned it!). Also helps to appreciate how tough refereeing is (plus it looks like you're doing some kind of a flag dance when you're unsure).

              Comment


              • #22
                I agree with k'max. Too much anticipation can lead you to miss the unexpected cut. OTOH too little engagement can mean that you're not exerting enough authority over the shiai (this especially when you're chushin).

                I've always marvelled at how easy it is to see the cut when in the audience (or even on the sidelines waiting to rotate on as a shimpan), and how hard as soon as you step into the shiaijo. Nerves obviously make you a little blinder than normal.

                b

                Comment


                • #23
                  that's so true eh?

                  so easy to see the points when you are waiting. on the sideline

                  but i think the reason that you see the points really well when you are just looking is that you can wander your attention to something else, so when you actually see the match you are more relax,,,,,and no decision to take. You can always take a break when looking at a match....but not when shinpan? (I guess!)

                  but that's a bit obvious :P

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    oh ya !

                    I love giving hansoku !!

                    HANSOKU IKKAI! with pointing with the finger....

                    so cool

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      My favourite was (now no longer used):
                      "Kousei o gaisuru koi - chui!" (Warning for unfair play).

                      b

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by AlexM
                        I have to say that I (politely) disagree with your philosophy of remaining somewhat distant from the competition. I think being able to watch and anticipate what might come next can certainly help in making the right call.
                        The others have pretty much said what I was going to say. Essentially the best way to get yourself into trouble is trying to read ahead. Perhaps the higher dan grades might be able to, but I would suggest that even they would refrain from this whilst judging. I have been told by a number of wizened old men that detachment can help you in a number of ways including:
                        impartiality and rational decision-making.

                        By detachment I mean remaining focused on the events of the shiai whilst having no emotional investment.

                        [snippage]

                        Understanding how the opponents are fighting each other and what each one is trying to do seems important to judging.
                        I beg to differ.
                        The only things you need concern yourself with are wether or not they make a valid cut, whether or not an infringement occurs and whether or not there is a safety issue (yes a little potted, I know, but you can fit most judging decisions into one of these three areas).
                        What the players do or do not do has no bearing whatsoever outside of this framework.


                        As to having to back up a refereeing decision I have to say that your attitude disapoints me. People DO question desicions and answering them with silence seems ridiculous to me. After all, it's difficult to learn if you can't know what you did wrong.
                        Forgive me if I dont go running for the razor blades.

                        Asking for an explanation and demanding justification are two entirely different animals. That being said, if someone asks for an explanation regarding a judging decision, you may choose to give them one or not, but to have to keep in the back of your mind a justification for every shiai decision that you make, just in case some whiner gets his/her panties in a bunch is sheer lunacy (imnsho)



                        I'm not implying that shinpan should become a new breed of spineless jellyfish (do any jellyfish actually have spines?).
                        no.
                        www.aqua.org/animals/species/jellies.html

                        A decision is a decision end of story but one must be willing to back up a desicion with somekind of justification (e.g. "your kote was good but lacked zanshin" or "your kote was good but the opponent hit men at the same time").
                        Respectfully, that is bullshit, for reasons that I have stated above.
                        Not only that, but (depending on the way the question/whinge is phrased), it can be seen as being highly rude for a competitor to question the decision of a shinpan. Even if it is clearly a mistake on the shinpan's part.
                        Just an aside on this, judges of sumo basho traditionally carry a tanto tucked into their kimono so that they may commit seppuku should they commit a judging error. I believe this is more a statement on the self-governining nature of shinpan than it is on a handy method of eliminating bad judging.


                        Of course, one of the beautiful things about kendo is it's amateur nature and the fact that a blown call really isn't the end if the world for those involved (could you imagine the kind of controversies that would take place if this were an olympic sport?).
                        The year before last, in the zen nihon kendo taikai, Miyazaki won with a men cut that was blocked. His aite (whose name escapes me - which is bad because he is also quite famous), actually cut a very impressive kaeshi do after blocking the men, however the point was awarded to Miyazaki.
                        The point was replayed two or three times on tv, and during that time, not one of the commentators said a word. They did not comment on the decision of the judge, nor on the strike itself.
                        That event encapsulates more or less everything that I have said above if you have a think about it.
                        As for kendo being an olympic sport, those kind of controversies (among other things) are part of the reason it is not. No one likes a sore loser.
                        Last edited by Ares2907; 22nd August 2002, 03:44 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          What Alex means when he says you have to back up your decision and be ready to always give a justification of it is because there must have been a reason why there was a point or not!


                          If you are ready to explain yourself why you would give such a point then that means you reallly saw it and you know what you are doing. Of course no kenshi will ask you to make justification because you should always trust shinpan judgement, also because error made by shinpan are part of the whole and we have to accept it. But it doesn't mean that the shinpan should not think about what point they should give or not! There should always be a justification in their head of why they would give or not the point. No one will ask why but they should ask themselve why they gave or not a point, because it is rude.. But Shinpan don't have a direct connection to god, they are human and have a judgement, if they can't elaborate their judgement (to themselves or to others) then they are just jellyfish.

                          happy kendo!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by kendokamax
                            [B]What Alex means when he says you have to back up your decision and be ready to always give a justification of it is because there must have been a reason why there was a point or not!
                            perhaps, though having a reason and having a justification are not the same things. It's not merely a matter of semantics. If someone asks me the reasoning behind a particular decision and I am able to recall I am more inclined to answer that for instance if some whining crybaby came up to me and said
                            'why didn't you score that kote 5 matches ago'. I would feel quite justified in telling them to fuck off. I probably wouldn't, but I might strongly suggest intercourse and travel.

                            While I'm continuing my tirade, I wanted to make a clarification.
                            re what I believe a shinpan should/should not be concentrating on - as far as watching the competitors go, one should use one's own experience and should know what their actions might lead to, however, trying to predict what one or the other will do is just a no no.

                            [snippage]
                            But it doesn't mean that the shinpan should not think about what point they should give or not!
                            You're misrepresenting what I was saying.
                            I'm not saying don't think about it, I am saying that once a decision has been made, that is the end of it, whether it was a good decision or not.


                            There should always be a justification in their head of why they would give or not the point.
                            Again, semantics. Reason, yes - during a shiai at the time of the decision. Justification - not at any time. ever.
                            You appear to be talking about the reasoning process that goes into making a decision. I am talking about situations after the event where ones judgement is brought into question.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Max my friend thanks for your help.
                              You guys are taking me way to seriously (no one takes me seriously, and certainly not about something like kendo).
                              I've already explained what I ment (or tried to mean) in previous posts about following the "flow" of a match (I should have kept it to that vague notion).
                              The justification part of my post actually comes from my sensei because of a decision I made during a shiai. I didn't give a point on kote because I felt the opponent was hitting men at the same time: more ai-uchi than anything else in my opinion (turned out I should have because the men hit was slighlty late and because it was purely defesive and not made with the intention of getting an ippon). Sensei told me that my decision was valid (although he also indicated it was wrong in no uncertain terms) but that I would have to back it up (with what I said about the men and kote being ai-uchi). Telling people to "fuck off" seems rude and VERY arrogant. If I'm officialy shinpaning several years down the road I would NEVER treat people this way simply because I happen to be a shinpan (Could you imagine telling someone like Taro Ariga to accept the decision without question...that dude has clout, plus he's gigantic). There is a limit to the respect of rank and position. A decision is a decision but nothing stops us from having a reasoning behind the decision. Of course I don't really have to justify what I meant now do I (h h).
                              This is the last I'll say on this subject that was spawed from one stinking post.

                              Happy kendo!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by AlexM
                                Sensei told me that my decision was valid (although he also indicated it was wrong in no uncertain terms) but that I would have to back it up (with what I said about the men and kote being ai-uchi).
                                Which falls in line with what I was saying about a situation where judging is being taught et al.

                                [quote]
                                Telling people to "fuck off" seems rude and VERY arrogant. If I'm officialy shinpaning several years down the road I would NEVER treat people this way simply because I happen to be a shinpan
                                [quote]


                                Read a little more carefully, I'm not advocating this line of action, I'm just vehemently against whiners.


                                Wait - is this a five-minute argument or the full half-hour?. . .

                                (Could you imagine telling someone like Taro Ariga to accept the decision without question...that dude has clout, plus he's gigantic).

                                Yes. Absolutely. I could care less who it is. I don't have this god-like awe thing about exceptional kendoka or anyone else for that matter. There are people who's kendo I drool over, but that's something else entirely.


                                There is a limit to the respect of rank and position. A decision is a decision but nothing stops us from having a reasoning behind the decision. Of course I don't really have to justify what I meant now do I (hh.
                                *sigh*
                                I can almost hear the rush of air as my last post passes in its entirety over your cranium. Did you absorb at all what I was saying about the difference between reason and justification?
                                Have another go. Maybe osmosis will do its thing if nothing else.

                                This is the last I'll say on this subject that was spawed from one stinking post.

                                Happy kendo!

                                Your one stinking post, as I recall it, was opening itself up to responses from a public forum (funnily enough). You may not like what gets let out of Pandora's box, but hey it's out there. Of course there are going to be differences of opinion and sometimes the best you can do is agree to disagree.
                                Personally I quite enjoy a good argument, but you have to be willing to consider the other point of view, otherwise it's just the monty python argument sketch inclusive of being hit on the head lessons.
                                (what a stupid concept). ahem.

                                Happy kendo to you, sir.
                                Last edited by Ares2907; 23rd August 2002, 10:19 PM.

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