Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

French Taunts King Arthur.

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • French Taunts King Arthur.

    A question people.

    Is taunting allowed in Kendo?

    We were practicing some gigeiko and my opponent (a nidan) started to taunt me, well, attempted to anyway. I was concentrating so hard I wasn't listening and at one point I actually stopped and went, "huh?" Heh, he then went, "Nothing! I'm taunting you!" So I was like, "um, okay.."

    But anyway his taunts were along the lines of shouting, "C'mon!you're weak! Yeah, nice try" etc. Or laughing at the opponent.

    Actually the laughing bit was a bit unnerving.

    But anyways is this allowed?

    Does anyone else do this?

    MENG

  • #2
    IMO, in a shiai, an alert shimpan would rule that kind of behavior as hansoku.

    I think taunting is unacceptable in the dojo, regardless of rank. Jigeiko is not a bar-room brawl.

    Of course, sometimes sempai or sensei may goad you on, but that's just encouragement...

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, this kind of behaviour, if noticed by the shinpam, is hansoku.

      Anyway, besides matches and so, it's unnaceptable behaviour.

      Comment


      • #4
        In shiai, this attitude is definitely unacceptable, and yes, they deserve a hansoku and a hard beating from you to crash their massive big head to the ground. It is totally unacceptable behaivour as said above. However if during jigeiko, things can be different. Our sensei, and I know other senseis and high graded people do that in order to "fire-up" the person they are training with.
        "hora doushita doushita" (come on, what's the matter?)
        "ima no ippon dato omounayo" (don't think that was any ippon)
        "doko ni mentama tuketenda" (where the hell are you looking at) etcetc we also get alot of chuckling as well as very very rough kendo from them.
        This is the case with a sensei/higher graded people, they have a valid enough reason in why they are doing so... so it maybe a different case to you Meng, but if it's some idiot only trying to do it to put your mind off things, just ignore and give them a very hard time, and maybe they'll learn a lesson sooner or later... probably learn a lesson the hard way (or so I hope)

        Comment


        • #5
          It wasn't so much a bad thing to me. It didn't really effect me much but it was more a surprise. I am so used to kendo being serious, respectful and controlled so the talking was kinda surprising.

          heh

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by KhawMengLee
            It wasn't so much a bad thing to me. It didn't really effect me much but it was more a surprise. I am so used to kendo being serious, respectful and controlled so the talking was kinda surprising.

            heh
            A well-placed tsuki will often end conversation. Chances are better than average of landing it, given your aite's focus is on flapping his head.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have known sensei you use mada, mada, mada as a means of encouragement. Kind of like OK next, what else are you going to do. I don't think it was a taunt at all, he was encouraging you.

              But I could be out base as I was not there

              Comment


              • #8
                Counter-Taunting (\ /#)

                Originally posted by Ares2907


                A well-placed tsuki will often end conversation. Chances are better than average of landing it, given your aite's focus is on flapping his head.
                Agree agree.... or a "accidental" DO cut ended up in arm-pit tends to shut the person up :P ...... Or letting the guy gasping for air ...

                Normally, people who do taughting, are most people who think they are alot better than you, and looks down at you. Best is one day, give him a good thrashing in geiko, then he will get so pissed off, then he will be serious .... By then, this time, you will be the one laughing at him.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have actually had someone start singing at the beginning of a match, but it was stopped right away by the head judge of our mock-shiai. It didn't bother me a whole lot, but it is a sign of disrespect I think.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's disrespectful whether its in a match or not. But you really don't have much to worry about. People with that attitude do not last long in kendo. The formalities, respect and emphasis on basics tend to drive them away quickly.

                    In the meantime, take it as an opportunity. I try to use it as a mental exercise to improve my zanshin and shiai composure. If you are listening to what he says enough to understand it, in a sense he has captured your mind as much as opponent who can fake you out of position. Although he's probably too poor a kendoka to capitalize on it either way, don't let that stop you from learning from the situation.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X