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  • #16
    You can see this one of two ways:

    - You have kendo talent who regularly contend for a position on the WKC podium in your own backyard to be proud of and whom you can learn from

    - need I describe the other way of seeing this?

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    • #17
      If they were born in the country they represent, then they are not foreign! ethnicity has nothing to do with it(most nations)...unfortunately, a lot of people don't tryout due to fear that they aren't good enough because of what they look like.

      does a person born into a Kendo family or Kendo enviornment have a better chance of making a national squad in a top tier Nation? probably yes. but is it a must or a sure thing? probably no. Is it possible for a Kendo-ist that started Kendo in their mid to late 20's to make a national squad in a top tier Nation? no, but it will be difficult and require a lot of training!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Scott H View Post
        I think the point here is that many of these folks are Naturalized citizens. Meaning that they were raised in Japan and most likely benefited from learning Kendo at a very young age. I.e. - they were brought up in Kendo, moved to a country, became a citizen of that country and then fought for the team.
        Not the case in Canada. Some Japanese people will ensure that their kids are born in Japan which is the case for a few I think but they were then brought back to Canada as babies and raised here. I know there was an issue last team with one of the girls who was born in Japan and moved here at age 3 but somehow never applied for citizenship. There's also one fellow who was raised in Canada through grade school but then lived in Japan for high school and college. But for the most part all of the team members were raised in Canada and learned the bulk of their kendo in Canadian dojos.

        The main advantage the nisei have is being pushed into kendo at a young age and not allowed to quit. That's a cultural thing that results in an advantage that is hard to overcome for people who start later in life. But there have been some people who have done it, in fact the current men's coach Matthew Raymond is such an example. If memory serves he started in his teens.

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        • #19
          I don't believe in separation of ethnicity or whatever playing the role here. I believe in how is your own focus or your parents focus playing bigger role here. For example, many Caucasian parents focus there children onto something like hockey so they start their children very early in the beginning that results in most of the hockey player are white. In the mean time, many African concentrate their children in basket ball and the results show up later. How many white or black parents focus on Kendo so their children starting it early? not much. No matter what you think, Kendo is still Japanese culture and many Japanese parents start their children in Kendo much earlier than the rest of us.

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          • #20
            Isn't it the same thing as saying why are most people in the NFL american? Its because they were exposed to it at an early age. Barring which country you were born in, if you started kendo at 3-4 and stuck with it, had natural athleticism, wouldn't you be pretty good at it too? When I visited japan we were motodachi for kids at one dojo, I lost count of how many 3 and 4 year olds there were and I'm not joking. At our dojo in the states we're lucky to have one or two 9-10 year olds. The reason at least I think that japanese-american, japanese-canadian, etc., are good at it is because they're exposed to it at an early age. Some stick with it some don't but they have years, and years, of experience that others don't. I would expect the same from some other nationality that was exposed to it at an early age as well, but I see it as purely experience related.

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            • #21
              Also the quality of the dojo is,a,massive part of it. Having a hachidan or a few hachidan and high graded sensei in the dojo helps a little! which in my opinion is why certain nations have some amazing kendo like the USA, Canada, Brazil etc. Which incidentally have quite large Japanese communities.

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              • #22
                I see were this is going! glad to hear all your views on why we suck at the beginning... Maybe i should quit kendo, maybe i shouldn't. but my sensei said i got potential... but then theres the part were i find myself in keiko and not know exactly what to do or what are the fundamentals of keiko... just thrown in bogu and tossed in keiko. Anyways maybe i'll try a little hard on practice next time.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by sarge127 View Post
                  Maybe i should quit kendo
                  Why would you do that?

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                  • #24
                    Oh... Many reasons... and many non-reasons why i should quit. some people are trying to discourage me in saying how bad it is and how long it will take to master it and that i don't have the time but seriously i got the time and i got the dedication but im told different i will never reach there skill... that it would take a life time for me to reach them... so... big reason there.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by sarge127 View Post
                      Oh... Many reasons... and many non-reasons why i should quit. some people are trying to discourage me in saying how bad it is and how long it will take to master it and that i don't have the time but seriously i got the time and i got the dedication but im told different i will never reach there skill... that it would take a life time for me to reach them... so... big reason there.
                      No offense but whats your point there, you won't make the Canadian team? Not sure how old you are but if you're in your twenties and just starting kendo I'd say you have a slim chance, not no chance but slim, but is that why you do kendo? There are many other things than just age as well. Speaking as someone who participated in our regional team the schedule was unbelievable demanding, every other weekend was a 4.5 hour drive for a 1.5-3 hour practice, and thats only regional, I can only imagine what the big boys do. Compound that with wife, kids, job, etc., and my hat is off to anyone with the dedication for that. I didn't see anyone say how bad kendo is and its and unobtainable goal, but I think its a truthful statement that nothing replaces time on the floor, talent helps, but it isn't a substitute.

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                      • #26
                        Most of us will never be competing on the international stage in anything, and we all have to make our peace with that. One of the best things about kendo is that it is a personal journey. If you are learning and progressing, that is the main thing. It doesn't matter what your overall level is, or what the level of other people is.

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                        • #27
                          What? i never said anything in me joining the canadian team...
                          i turned 19 just last december and do you think i got a chance? no... But no im not trying to rant in me trying to get a spot on the canadian team just saying my kendo is no good and that people suggest i should quit and do something more today like hockey or soccer...

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by sarge127 View Post
                            Oh... Many reasons... and many non-reasons why i should quit. some people are trying to discourage me in saying how bad it is and how long it will take to master it and that i don't have the time but seriously i got the time and i got the dedication but im told different i will never reach there skill... that it would take a life time for me to reach them... so... big reason there.
                            This is like saying you shouldn't play chess because you'll never be a master; or you don't want to go to college because you won't get a Fulbright scholarship.

                            I seem to recall that you haven't gone to college yet. You're probably young enough to get pretty good if you put in the time and have the talent. But like many young people (and some old ones) you are worrying too much about end results and not enough about enjoying the process.

                            Originally posted by sarge127 View Post
                            What? i never said anything in me joining the canadian team...
                            i turned 19 just last december and do you think i got a chance? no... But no im not trying to rant in me trying to get a spot on the canadian team just saying my kendo is no good and that people suggest i should quit and do something more today like hockey or soccer...
                            Didn't you just start? You don't even have bogu yet?

                            This is a little early to be down on yourself that your Kendo is "no good." If you enjoy it, keep doing it, if not, stop. But don't quit because you're a beginner -- everyone started somewhere.
                            Last edited by jjcruiser; 15th March 2012, 06:17 AM.

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                            • #29
                              I know where you are coming from. I think Kendo can give the beginners delusions of grandeur which then are quickly quashed and can subsequently cause them to quit.

                              I don't know how old you but I started Kendo in my late twenties. I was told by my head sensei pretty much from the start that my Kendo will always be hampered by problems that are associated with that starting age - stiffness and footwork and it will get harder. That doesn't mean I wanted to quit Kendo at that point - I saw Kendo as a challenge worth taking. I am thankful that there are many people in my club who are stronger and faster that me because how else can you improve?

                              Lastly, If you practice with "small thoughts" you'll look back a few years from now and will see how much you have matured and improved as a Kendo practioner - that I can promise you.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Just a thought, but I have met a few Japanese guys now who have started learning kendo from scratch in their 50's and one godan that re-started in his 70's after a 20+ year break and surviving a tough bout of cancer. One of the guys who started in his 50's I met during a visit to Japan and he was learning in quite a tough kendojo, I hope to see him again next visit. Another few I met who had made it up to 3-4 dan level who had also started well past their 40's. The Westerners I have met who started later generally seemed to give up after a while, no offence meant there, just an observation thus far. Although, I understand there are a few Westerners here on KWF that have stuck with it after starting beyond 40 or 50.

                                I don't know why but I find these guys to be equally inspiring, and perhaps even more inspiring than the young competitive players who are incredibly talented and strong. The fact that they are doing it purely for their own journey and perhaps cultural purposes at such a difficult age, it sticks in my mind as the type of people to look up to.

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