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  • #16
    The same panel took away a yuko in golden time that would have put Ebihara through so not sure if there's some backdoor concerted effort or not to advance Japan (I doubt any discussion here will elucidate on this matter). In any case it was confusing and ugly to say the least. I felt so bad for both players.

    Also the women's epee (also involving South Korea) was another case of baffling officiating. Apparently some British press depicted Shim A Lam's wait while the decision was being protested (where if she left the piste it would signal acceptance of the referee's decision) as some sort of hissy fit sit-down protest.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Lloromannic View Post
      They start training children towards the olympics at similar ages or younger and with greater intensity. Children who display athletic ability are picked (this is at age 5 mind you) and sent to special sports 'schools' where their only real activity is training towards winning at their sport, which they may or may not like.
      Kids don't like anything (except facebook and Twitter)!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dervish View Post
        What do they do after they're done with their competitive sports career? It doesn't seem like they're prepared for much else.
        Much like British Graduates....

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        • #19
          They don't, some of them may be able to do this. but the majority then go back to the real world with no skills to do well in it.

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          • #20
            Same problem with the refereeing in the boxing, Japanese bantamweight knocked down an azerbaijani 6 times and still lost. With the new scoring system it just makes it easy for judges to be extremely biased.

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            • #21
              The Olympics highlight everything that is right and wrong with sports.

              Like American televisers claiming that a woman runner 'must be cheating' because she was 'as fast as a man' and such.

              Sigh.

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              • #22
                Well, the girl of my country Urška Žolnir just won a golden medal so I'm far away of complaining. Yeah, I don't enjoy watching sports but when it's about our guys a bit of patriotism helps me to sit before TV horror.
                And if we forget on honour for a moment - wouldn't be very good for popularization of kendo (and therefore for improving of the income from the Treasury), if we made it one of Olympic sports? And yes, I AM aware of disgrace of kendo spirit in that case. I'm just thinking a bit .... Materialistic? Practical? Capitalistic?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tomoe Gozen View Post
                  I'm just thinking a bit .... Materialistic? Practical? Capitalistic?
                  But Kendo isn't any one of these things in and of itself. >.>

                  If the only thing we wanted out of kendo was to make it more popular and gain access to the same things found in other sports (publicity, sponsors, money, fame) then it would be pointless to practice it the way we do now.

                  If that was the goal, then you'd see electronic bogu in every dojo - probably referred to as "kendo gyms" or something ridiculous- with sensei as young as 25 running around trying to teach people the ways to win in the fastest most effective way, and no one would observe reigi or if they did it would be meaningless and insincere.

                  And what would be left of the "shinai as sword" mentality would be obliterated. It would turn into a world of side-of-the-blade-flicking to score and gratuitous displays of ego and poor sportsmanship, and there would be no more sutemi, no more ki ken tai, no more zanshin, kata or respect...and no more kendo.

                  ...or something.

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                  • #24
                    Kendo and the Olympics is one of those dead horse issues. As for claims of making kendo more popular I am not sure it would unless it were to change. I think the high attrition rate of prospective kenshi is due to a combination of things that make kendo special to the rest of us that stick with it (i.e. emphasis on reiho, slow progression rate, difficulty of getting it 'right', etc ). I would prefer to see a smaller number of dedicated people than to see a large number of goobers.

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                    • #25
                      Yeah, I can understand your reasons but - what if there would be the same or maybe even more stringent criteria for Olympics as they are for WKC? Would it really had that influence on philosophy of kendo? Think about it like a challenge. Can we keep kendo in all it's spirit but just with one more prestige competition. Actually we could only change name - from WKC to Olympic - and keep the essence same. Am I totally missed?

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                      • #26
                        Well, yes. You can't just change the name of the event, I am pretty sure the IOC would be upset about that. Contrary to what a lot of people think, being an olympic sport and even being in the Games does not mean money unless you are in one of the more popular sports.

                        http://www.buzzfeed.com/jtes/the-str...ves-in-poverty

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                        • #27
                          I agree. But to be Olympic DOES mean publicity and popularity. And if people would know about kendo - and if we could keep it's patina of a bit mystic - I am pretty sure that this could be good opportunity for kendo to get some new members and so - money.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by MikeW View Post
                            Kendo and the Olympics is one of those dead horse issues. As for claims of making kendo more popular I am not sure it would unless it were to change. I think the high attrition rate of prospective kenshi is due to a combination of things that make kendo special to the rest of us that stick with it (i.e. emphasis on reiho, slow progression rate, difficulty of getting it 'right', etc ). I would prefer to see a smaller number of dedicated people than to see a large number of goobers.
                            This.

                            Tomoe Gozen, you said: "think about it like a challenge. Can we keep kendo in all its spirit but just with more than one prestige competition."

                            My answer is: would we really have any control over what it becomes? I think no. Even if we did, I doubt we could do much to keep it the way it is now. It would become all about who wins and who loses, which is entirely missing the point of kendo (so it would become something else entirely). It is a "michi", a "way," not a sport. Of course it has its sporting elements, but I cannot classify it as such. Kendo would be one big shiai-obsession, and practice would no longer be the point.

                            My question for you is: why do you practice kendo? To win? For recognition/ respect? To improve yourself? (of course the answer to that is your business and yours alone, so no need to reply to that here.)

                            The answer to that question for me also applies to how I feel about it being in the olympics. I don't give a damn about prestige with regards to kendo, and don't like the idea of making money from it either.

                            Just my two cents.
                            Last edited by Shinsengumi77; 4th August 2012, 02:02 AM.

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                            • #29
                              After thinking I should give you right. Just be careful - I think that 'warriorship' - so good things in kendo, like reigi, honour, technically perfection, self control and hard work - are absolutely NOT depend of martial art itself; what I want to say is that we can find great warriors between people which could be classified as an athletes - like in judo and fencing for example. I am pretty sure that is only matter of individual itself what (s)he would do from his/her personality and kendo. If you let competitions and lust for victory defeat you (and that would happened independent of name of competition), you are not kendoka and not worth of art itself. Oh - and: my name is Roza, for easily talking. I am not doing kendo for money or fame, because it is not area that it could be given in enough quantity. It would be much more practically to join other sport, wouldn't be? In fact, I hate competitions. It just way of thinking and I want to know your arguments. And I am apologizing for my bad english (not native speaker). I hope that you still understand what I mean.

                              Roza

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                              • #30
                                Rosa,

                                First off, to return the favor, my name's Tyler.

                                I think I understand what you're saying and I agree -it is up to the individual to conduct themselves appropriately and treat the art with respect, while maintaining all of its traditions and creeds. I think I'm coming from a mindset that holds that it is also the individual's responsibility to make sure the art is represented in the best way possible. If Kendo became an Olympic sport and changes into something bad, the way I practice it would not change at all (in reality I would strive even more to keep to the way I feel it should be kept) HOWEVER, I would not be able to have any power to help preserve kendo as it is.

                                In other words, the moment we decide to practice kendo seriously, we also bear a responsibility to do all we can for kendo as a whole, to help it grow (within reason -mostly to preserve it) and change appropriately, while maintaining its ideals and traditions. That is why, the more you train and develop, you OWE it to the people who taught you and everyone you've ever practiced with to return the favor and continue the cycle by teaching those who come after you.

                                You mention Judo and fencing as examples, but truthfully they reflect everything I hate about the Olympics (and support my view that Kendo should NOT be in them.)

                                I used to fence sabre, and the main reason I left was because it bore so little resemblance to swordsmanship that it was ridiculous. It was full of ego and bad sportsmanship -people whined and complained when they lost, boasted and yelled when they won, and bent their blades to score better (and their blades were treated badly in general.) I know there are decent people who fence, but what I saw was for the most part ugly.

                                I don't know much about judo, but it surely doesn't look like a martial art anymore.

                                So in short, because I practice Kendo and love it for what it is, I feel a responsibility to do what I can to protect it and show my respects to the people who made it what it is, and who helped make me who I am.

                                I hope this makes sense.

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