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  • The rebirth of Kendo

    While in Japan I came across the Toshogu Butokuden hall in Nikko, outside which is a stone with "The place of the Kendo's rebirth" on it.

    Does anyone know any more about this? I'm assuming its from after World War 2 when Kendo was no longer banned?

    <rei>

    Dave

  • #2
    Still no reply to your thread, David. I do not know the answer, but I hope somebody chimes in!

    Comment


    • #3
      Butokuden in Nikko...? Are you sure?

      Nikko Tousyouguu

      Here, right?



      I run thru the Nikko Tousyouguu official site (from the local tourist association), and they never mentioned a Butokuden inside.

      You've probably mixed up your photos... The Dai-nihon Butokuden is in Kyoto. It was dismissed in 1946:

      Comment


      • #4
        Butokuden in Kyoto

        The Dai Nippon Butoku Kai was organized in 1985 and the Butokuden in Kyoto built in 1899 the Bujutsu Senmon Gakko(Bussen) a martial arts college was established in 1911....the DNBK issued rank and shugo for eighteen different martial arts including kendo....they where closed by the Allied Occupation Forces in 1946.....kendo reorganized as the AJKF in 1949 and Judo as the Kodankan the same year....The DNBK reorganized in 1953 one year after the signing of the San Franciso Peace Treaty....The Butokuden in still on the grounds of the Heian Shrine in Kyoto and there is a more modern Budo Center next door....there is a Large Stone between the two that marks the site of the original Butoku Den built by Emperor Kanmu in 794 A.D....this could be what you guys are talking about......the current Butokuden is the site of the Kyoto Taikai ever May

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        • #5
          Don't know what you're referring to in Nikko, but kendo was practiced in secret during the occupation years in many places, including around Kobe (heard from one of my sensei who was training then) so I don't think that there was any one place that could lay claim to being the 're-birth of kendo.'

          Was it in Japanese or English?

          Comment


          • #6
            My 10 yen's worth.

            The AJKF was formed a few years after Judo in 1952 not 1949. And, the Butokuden still stands where it was built originally, over one hundred years ago. This is near the Heian Shrine but by no means a part of it. When the Dai Nippon Butokukai was orginally founded, branch dojos were created in all prefectures around the country. There was even a branch dojo in Kyoto where the Butokukai was based. Therefore, it is more than likely that there was a Butokukai dojo in Nikko. Incidentally, most of the branch dojos were constructed along the same design as the Butokuden in Kyoto.

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow - thanks Charlie - from no replies to lots...

              Well, its definitely in Nikko. It looks like this.

              Comment


              • #8
                And here's the stone outside

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                • #9
                  Dear Friend,

                  As Alex mentioned, every prefecture has his own "butokuden" or "bodokan". The one in "Nikko" is used for the annual "International Goodwill Kendo Club"-association meeting and keiko in August. Also some other kendo related festivals are organized at this location... Well known members of the "IGKC" are for example Inoue sensei, Fukuda, Hirakawa sensei and before they passed away Nakakura & Narazaki sensei...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yeah, David, I got a lot of juice around here. (Wink!)

                    Seriously, interesting replies! Thanks, guys.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      So this place's claim to fame as THE place of Kendo's rebirth may be a bit extravagant then? "One of the places..." perhaps?

                      And I thought there might be some good story there....oh well....

                      <rei>

                      Dave

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Okay,

                        I've found out why this particular dojo is considered the place of the 're-birth' of kendo.

                        As you know, kendo and other budo arts were prohibited after WWII because of links with militaristic ideology before and during the war. However, the Nikko Tournament (Tochigi Prefecture) was restarted by the Tochigi Kenyukai in August 1951 at the dojo in question. #2 was held in August the following year. At the second Nikko Taikai, many dignitaries were invited to attend, and this occasion was used as a catalyst to get the ball rolling to form the All Japan Kendo Federation.

                        Following the 2nd Nikko Taikai, the AJKF was formed on the 14th October 1952. The reason why the dojo is slated as being the place of re-birth for kendo was because it is where all the powers that were to be gathered and finalised their plan of action to officially get kendo accepted again without the links to a facist militaristic regime. - A new democratic kendo was born... Any way, I hope that answers your question.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fantastic! So there was a good story....

                          How on earth did you find all this out?

                          <rei>

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Actually, I work at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies, and they give me a huge budget to sit on my backside and buy lots of books to read. I recently spent a fair amount of my budget on purchasing hundreds of kendo books. One of the sets (katana to kendo) I bought (for US$2000) had a bit of info about Nikko and the famous tournament. So it was just luck really. Luck and a whole lot of spending money compliments of the good tax-payers of Japan!

                            www.nichibun.ac.jp

                            check it out

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "Actually, I work at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies, and they give me a huge budget to sit on
                              my backside and buy lots of books to read."

                              Alex, I used to like you...

                              "I recently spent a fair amount of my budget on purchasing hundreds of kendo books. One of the sets (katana to kendo) I bought (for US$2000) had a bit of info about Nikko and the famous tournament. So it was just luck really. "

                              I used to think, 'gee he must work real hard to produce that mag. Good on him'...

                              "Luck and a whole lot of spending money compliments of the good tax-payers of Japan!"

                              Now I know you're a complete BASTARD! If I ever here you complain about your lot here or IRL, I will repaste this quote of yours in a most painful place.

                              Good day to you sir.
                              <doffs hat in angry, yet restrained manner of a gentleman>

                              b

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