Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Uploading to Youtube: Yes or No?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Uploading to Youtube: Yes or No?

    This isn't about posting video or picture, but it is related to video so I thought this forum would be appropriate.

    When I first started doing kendo tournaments and having video of them, I would upload nearly all of my videos to Youtube without a second thought so I could show my friends and family. Now, I rarely upload my videos unless I talk to my opponent and they would like to see it. I do this for a couple of reasons. First, there does not really need to be that many videos of me doing kendo on the internet since no one really cares that much and if they do then they can get the idea after one or two videos. Second, I feel weird uploading a video of someone else's (my opponent's) kendo to public view on Youtube without their consent.

    So what is your opinion on this matter? Do you think it's okay to upload videos without telling a person who is in the match? I have no problem if you think it is okay, it's just something that I feel weird about. Maybe my feelings are unwarranted?

    *Also, I want to make it quite clear that I have no problem with people uploading their videos, please upload away!

  • #2
    Shiai are usually open to anyone who wants to watch so since it is a public event I see no issue uploading it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just last week I discovered a shiai video of myself on Youtube (uploaded by my opponent). He didn't identify me by name, and I am OK with it.

      I don't think I'd be OK with it if the video was open to public and I was mentioned by name since it shows up on Google search and I'd like to keep Google queries limited to my professional contributions (research papers, mainly). That's just a personal preference.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Kareem Sampson View Post
        Shiai are usually open to anyone who wants to watch so since it is a public event I see no issue uploading it.
        There's a difference between a public event and a permanent, globally available record of such an event. Some people would prefer not to be on youtube, and I think you need to respect that by doing them the courtesy of asking. At the very least, don't identify them without permission.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
          There's a difference between a public event and a permanent, globally available record of such an event. Some people would prefer not to be on youtube, and I think you need to respect that by doing them the courtesy of asking. At the very least, don't identify them without permission.
          Yep, definite agreement on this. So yeah, get permission whenever possible and don't identify people otherwise. That's just having proper respect for others. I don't really care if people take vids of my matches but I think I would be more protective of my privacy if I were female or if my niece/nephew were involved.

          Comment


          • #6
            I know of several sensei that were relatively incensed that someone had uploaded a video of them without asking. I would always ask before uploading things such as this if at all possible. Most people are probably not going to have a problem with it but the person that uploaded the said video (no, it wasn't me) ended up having a rokudan and a nanadan sensei very upset with them. Reiho is not just for when you are on the dojo floor with bogu on, reiho is a part of life. It is always better to ere on the side of respect for others. You should always try to go up to your opponent after the shiai and them them for the match, similarly if you, or someone you know, is recording the match you should seek that person out to ask if they mind if you post it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I am probably known as uploading quite number of videos on youtube. I do it for number of reasons. 1) It takes too much space on my PC 2) I share my vids with other students. 3) I watch every videos at least 10 times to check other people's kendo.. 4) I can compare my vids(uploaded them since 2008) and how much I have improved. 5) I can watch anytime and anywhere..

              Here is what I do. I usually ask people before I upload them. For shiai, I uploaded them since it is public match. Probably more polite to ask everyone if I can upload them but it is technically impossible. However, if anyone ask me remove them, I will do so without any challenge. So far none. I usually don't post recent 2 months of practice before the competition so others cannot analyze my students and fellows. Most of our students are very happy with youtube vids..

              Comment


              • #8
                Different cultures will have different sensibilities about this. In Japan people are extremely weary of being exposed in publicly accessible media. That's why people's faces are blurred in the news unless they've given explicit consent and also why on my blog I subtly fudge out faces and license plates. I also try not to show anyone's zekken in any sort of easy to read way.

                As an illustration of how far the sentiment goes, early on when I first arrived in Japan, I was once at an amusement park in the suburbs of Tokyo. There happened to be some kind of cosplay event there that day and the place was overrun by people dressed as anime and manga characters. Now one would think, 1) it's a public place and 2) they're dressed to attract attention so it must be ok to take photos. I actually got told off for taking a photo of a group of blue haired oversized-cardboard-katana wearing people. Since then I've taken care never to assume someone in Japan is ok with their photos being taken.

                With regards to posting videos up and being willing to take them down if requested, this presumes that the other person will come across your video. I for one don't go searching the web for videos of me and I don't think I should have to if I want to keep my privacy.

                The fact of the matter is, new internet tools are allowing for radical changes in social behavior and neither their inventors nor we as a society are thinking through the implications fully.
                Last edited by dillon; 10th June 2013, 09:54 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Over the recent years we've had some debates about this in our club and as a result we set up some rules regarding filming and taking pictures in the dojo. We haven't had any trouble since.
                  Outside the dojo we ask our members to ask other peoples permission before making anything public.

                  Of course you can't always ask everybody who's in the viewer of your camera for permission so we have a way to share the vids with our members without making them available for everyone.
                  There are two ways: Putting them on youtube but only viewable if you have a direct link. The link is available on request.
                  I use a cloud service where I upload my vids and e-mail the link (so they can download the vid) to some of my dojomembers who want to watch the/their match.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's Avvo's take on it: http://bit.ly/1btGPl7

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gessho View Post
                      Here's Avvo's take on it: http://bit.ly/1btGPl7
                      I guess I was more interested on getting opinions on the etiquette of posting videos, not the legality.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Missingno. View Post
                        I guess I was more interested on getting opinions on the etiquette of posting videos, not the legality.
                        I understand, but your question was interesting and it sparked one in my mind around the legality of posting video with identified individuals.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          YouTube has three options for posting videos. Publicly where they can be found through search, related videos, etc. and seen by anyway; Unlisted which requires you to be given the direct link to the video and it cannot be found otherwise; and Privately, where you specify people to have access by their YouTube account name. The latter two are the ones we use at my dojo for posting videos. If anybody featured in one wishes to share it publicly through Facebook or elsewhere they are instructed to get permission from whomever they were recorded with.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes privately, to very few parties, sparingly and only if the video contains information that's significant or marks some sort of milestone.

                            No to video that's very recent and material I don't classify as immediately significant.

                            Yes to video that's historic and would otherwise be lost if not shared, if you can't otherwise find someone to privately share copies to, who would in turn share them privately to others that find them valuable. The recent iaido videos of Kusonose-sensei (iaido), one of the last Shimomura-ha MJER teachers, comes to mind as historic and significant.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm curious as there's a KW channel..What's KW's policy, or is there one?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X