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The Bekkasei Manual - Surviving Katsuura for Gaijins

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  • You are thinking of two separate things there. The tuiton for the one year course is around $6000 USD. This is a non negotiable payment as far as I am aware. You should also recieve a scholarship of 45000 yen a month for the duration, which also comes at around $6000 USD. From this comes your monthly spending including (and not much more) rent and food. So in effect, the course would cost you pretty much nothing save for transportation costs.


    Also, during the summer we didn't do too much I suppose, the dojo remains open so we practiced pretty much every day before the summer gasshuku started and after that, trainings resumed in the morning. It was also a pretty good time to use the gym as few people were still in the school.


    And also also, I would advise everyone who reads this thread to take it with a grain of salt. Many things have changed at the school and as amusing as it is, this does not quite reflect the situation now. I suppose we should start writing a new version sometime.

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    • I see. Getting the $6000 might be a problem though, if I have to pay it all at once. Good thing I know that now.

      It still seems like a very good oppertunity, I like the daily practice and japanese language/culture courses, and the holidays where you have the chance to explore Japan. The only thing I might have to get used to are the 2-man-dorms, I know thats manditory in US college lodgings but not here in Germany.

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      • Duh, can't edit. What are the chances to be accepted into the program and scholarship? 100%? If you haven't participated in national team tournaments?

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        • Pretty much about 90 to 100% for being accepted. They want people from over the world, and if you send your documents during the dates hat they requested, with all clearly stated in them, there's not a problem.

          Everyone gets the scholarship, no matter if you've been in tournaments or not.

          And not get too much excited with the Language course, better o start practicing before arriving to budai, and better to know also plain Japanese instead of polite, otherwise it might turn sometimes difficult to understand what the young pple and everyone is talking about.

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          • Hi!

            Is there anyone in this forum who is currently at IBU or was there recently? If so could you please update us a little bit? I'm very curious if the contents of this thread is still accurate.

            Mostly I want to know if the japanese instruction is any good and how the kendo practise is organized. Is it only ji-geiko, is there any structured technique-drills, lots of footwork? My basic question is if the school acually has a plan for teaching you stuff or if you have to look after yourself.

            I hope my rambling made any sense, cheers!

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            • My understanding is that the bekka men are still troublemakers and rapscallions, and the women bekka are still much too quiet about their experiences there.

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              • Hi.

                Things ae the same. Manual is still 90 % up to date.
                The only thing that changed is life in the kaikan, which became much easier since Buni and Fuji are not around anymore.

                Cheers


                Originally posted by J.S View Post
                Hi!

                Is there anyone in this forum who is currently at IBU or was there recently? If so could you please update us a little bit? I'm very curious if the contents of this thread is still accurate.

                Mostly I want to know if the japanese instruction is any good and how the kendo practise is organized. Is it only ji-geiko, is there any structured technique-drills, lots of footwork? My basic question is if the school acually has a plan for teaching you stuff or if you have to look after yourself.

                I hope my rambling made any sense, cheers!

                Comment


                • Morning practice (7:00-8:00 AM) is only drills. Lots of footwork, kirikaeshi, waza and kakarigeiko. Afternoon practice is usually only kirikaeshi, jigeiko and kakarigeiko. Presumably you are an adult when you go to uni and you'll know you have to look after yourself, but all the sensei and a lot of the students will be glad to help you if you ask (of course, this is japan so no one will volunteer for it)

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                  • Has anyone here been to IBU in the last year or two that could comment on the current state of it? All of the negative posts seem to be in the 2000-2004 year and there were some good comments about the 2007-2008

                    I know Kyudo isn't offered as a 1 year program, but did anyone make friends with the kyudo students? Gonzo?

                    I'm 29, 5 years kyudo study and just started kendo. I would like to be able to go there for Kyudo, or attend for Kendo and do Kyudo also. I've been to japan a few times already and have studies with different sensei's, so I know what I'm getting myself into.

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                    • The kaikan is more peaceful than years ago, indeed...
                      About doing at the same time kyudo and kendo, I am not quite sure if you can work it out: both bukatsu start and finish at about the same time, in 2 different locations (about 20min walk to reach the kyudojo from the kendojo)... ...

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                      • thanks snooz. I emailed IBU to ask if they are willing to let me do a Kyudo only bekkasei. If not, i will have to decide if I want to do 1 year of kendo study.

                        I'm ni-dan for kyudo so maybe it will be easier for them. I hope they can start a kyudo program.

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                        • FWIW I would not reccomend doing the bekka program without at least a nidan level in kendo.

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                          • Originally posted by Lloromannic View Post
                            FWIW I would not reccomend doing the bekka program without at least a nidan level in kendo.
                            Weren't people saying that about shodan just a few months ago?

                            Strictly outta curiosity, does anyone know what the average ranking among their domestic freshmen students is?

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                            • Shodan would be "ok" I think. I was shodan when I went there but I had been a shodan for 3 years at that point.

                              In my year, the makeup was:

                              3 Shodan, 1 Nidan. 4 Sandan, 2 Yondan, one nikkyu.

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                              • Originally posted by Lloromannic View Post
                                FWIW I would not reccomend doing the bekka program without at least a nidan level in kendo.
                                I second that.

                                while being shodan would be ok, a great experiance and would undoubtedly help your kendo.
                                I think you`d benifit more by having a certain level of maturity (understanding) in your kendo
                                to benifit from the trainings there.
                                In our home countries we expect and get good explainations about why things/ how things are done.
                                But over there it`s often a case of monkey see monkey see. you will improve, but I`m sure the lower levels
                                of kendo would benifit more from clear instruction. People of slightly higher levels can watch, see and answer
                                many of their own questions and form their own ideas about what they see. These people I believe would
                                benifit the most and gain so much more during thier time there. Glad to here life in the kaikan is better.
                                What about that crazy japanese teacher kurobane, she still there? replace her with someone good and it`d
                                be fantastic.

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