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The Bekkasei Manual - Surviving Katsuura for Gaijins

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  • #31
    I am not a psychiatrist, I don't know about sanity or insanity. I only know that before joining the bekkaseis I occasionally wore a cowboy hat while doing my daily putting practice on my personal mini-golf course at the law firm. I know that I took my boss's girl friend to Paris for Valentines Day. I know that I faked my way into meetings which I was not supposed to attend. I know that I practiced semme by pranking everybody who was not my in corner. I know that I broke the ceiling in one elevator with a hiki-men. I know that one client sent me a 'thank-you-card' and cash for advising her to find another lawyer. I know my department was practically dead whenever I had a day off. I know that I improved my negotiation skills by having meetings with the personel department about getting fired almost every three months and I certainly know that all of this foreplay prepared me reasonabily well for joining the madness of being bekkasei.
    Last edited by Gonzo Nakayui; 1st January 2005, 12:06 AM.

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    • #32
      What does bekkasei mean? (god, I'm such a n00b.)

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      • #33
        Bekka-sai

        Hi Light Samurai,

        Yours is not an odd question at all. Actually, the words bekka, and consequently bekka-sei are unusual, and the average Japanese won't even recognize them: The unusual program that the International Budo U and a handful of other colleges and universities in Japan are conducting is a one-year introduction course for foreigners (the intention is to prepare them for further study in Japan, a kind of preparatory course.)

        The full name of the one at IBU is the "bekka budou senshuu katei" it translates roughly to: the separate special curriculum for budo". IBU terms it the Budo Specialization Course.

        It is usually referred to there as the bekka, which means "the separate section". The students are called "bekka-sei", '-sei' being the same suffix that describes a college student, as in "gaku-sei."

        Hope this is helpful.

        MK

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        • #34
          Thank you very much, it has been a greta help ^^

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          • #35
            Bekka means "seperate"? That explains a lot!

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            • #36
              I always though that Bekka meant "special" or "different".....
              It kinda made sense to be the "different" student...or the "special" student.

              34 days to go.

              *does a happy dance*

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              • #37
                It always made me feel "special" to bear the title of bekkasei, but basically any gaijin is a sort of special or seperate person. As a gaijin you are in and out at the same time. You have to be in (Japan) to be an outsider.

                Since I am back in Holland I always tease the few Japanese who are playing kendo over here by saying: "Konbanwa gaijin san!" They are Japanese in Japan, but gaijin over here and when I tell'em, it really pisses them off! Which is good, cause it makes them stronger motodachi; "Gaijin san, gaijin san, gaijin, gaijin; waaaattaaaaaaaaah!" Shit, I really miss being a bekka gaijin!

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                • #38
                  I would be careful throwing the word gaijin around. Granted they are your friends so you know what's appropriate. As a gaijin in Japan, it's nice because you have a little bit of room for social blunders because you may not know any better. I am not saying be rude, but it is nice to have a bit of immunity to social customs, especially when you really don't understand, but you don't want to offend. However, gaijin can have a negative connotation, or at least that is what it can feel like depending on who is saying it. One of my sensei in Japan would call me gaijin-san until he learned my name, but his tone and intent was friendly. However, I have heard it in other situations where gaijin is not something you want to be.

                  Basically my point is that I wouldn't throw that word around. Sometimes it is not so nice.

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                  • #39
                    Yeah, yeah, yeah, you are right, I know what it is like. I was a gaijin for a year, but now I am back in the west and now I am the boss, so I call them gaijin whenever I want. Of course they beat the living day lights out of me for doing so, but that is my way of getting the best out of them. Tell a rokudan Japanese he is a gaijin and he turns into the reincarnation of Miyamoto Musashi himself! And, what more can you wish for? First piss'em of, than the respect will come later; I call it reverse diplomacy and believe me, it works just fine!

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                    • #40
                      Hmmmm. This Gonzo seems like a really cheeky fellow. But it does make me wish I could be a Bakkesei (?). I don't really like talking to people anyway. It could be a year of deprivation and peace. *sigh*

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                      • #41
                        Indeed

                        Originally posted by Kikuchiyo
                        Hmmmm. This Gonzo seems like a really cheeky fellow.
                        You have no idea how cheeky he is and can get when tempted. Actually you don't want to know. Just be glad that you are all the way in Canada, and not here in Holland where you might stumble upon him.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Fonsz
                          You have no idea how cheeky he is and can get when tempted. Actually you don't want to know. Just be glad that you are all the way in Canada, and not here in Holland where you might stumble upon him.
                          its not like he will never come to canada either......

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                          • #43
                            That's right Fonszy!!! You know what you are talking about. I shot down our national kendo forum this summer and it took'em six weeks to repair. I say: "Let's geiko; any time, any place, any where!"

                            Hooossu Kendokamax!!!! I will come, I wiiiiil certainly come and visit you when the hockey is back. I will jigeiko with you and also hunt down and beat that other little Canadian bastard.
                            Last edited by Gonzo Nakayui; 8th March 2005, 03:14 AM.

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                            • #44
                              You're....going to beat me up? I am so sad now. What a cruel and horrid world.

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                              • #45
                                Hahaha, that's the kendo way. Musahsi said it best, when he said: "Kendo is about beating the opponent, nothing more and nothing less!"

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