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  • What are Yudansha?

    Now, now - before you go jumping for the reply button...

    http://www.kendo-world.com/forum/showgroups.php

    Mods, admin, supermods, yudansha... what makes someone a yudansha?

  • #2
    Is yudansha person who holds a dan grade?
    And mudan is someone with kyu grade.
    Im not sure but this is what I think it is. In some competition there was mudan series and yudansha series.

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    • #3
      Did you read my post or just the title?

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      • #4
        Oh, I couldnt see the whole list last time. My browser loaded half of that. Now I saw it completely. I have no idea about that...

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        • #5
          It seems to be for the more active members of the board. After a quick look at the page, all the names i saw post fairly often.

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          • #6
            Eh? I'm a yuudansha. No love for me.

            Incidentally, when using this term, it's not a bad idea to emphaisze the long "u" sound:

            有段者 (yuudansha) Literally: "Person with a dan rank"

            油断者 (yudansha) "carelss person."

            Of course, it's okay to transliterate it into roman characters as "yudansha," as there is no universal standard for Enlgish spelling of Japanese words, but if you're speaking to a Japanese person, it's good to know the difference.

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            • #7
              Curses. There I go shooting my mouth off again. I am listed under "yudansha."

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              • #8
                I don't know why I bother. I warn people to read first and post second but I may as well have been showing my dog a card trick...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ScottUK
                  I don't know why I bother. I warn people to read first and post second but I may as well have been showing my dog a card trick...
                  . . . . . . . . . .Woof?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ScottUK
                    I don't know why I bother. I warn people to read first and post second but I may as well have been showing my dog a card trick...
                    Don't roll your eyes at me, Sunny Jim. I was making a perfectly valid observation. Perhaps not 100% relevant, but valid, nonetheless.

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                    • #11
                      Err.. There does exist a universal spelling of japanese words in english/ romaji (is this spelled right? ;D)

                      It's called Hepburn/hebon shiki. It's like that:

                      ou means long o, uu (like in yuudansha) means a long u.
                      ei (like in rei) is often (but I don't know/think if/that always) read as a long e.
                      Something like this. (That's not everything, but it's the most important)
                      I don't really know if this is perfectly right, but it should be ok.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ne0r
                        Err.. There does exist a universal spelling of japanese words in english/ romaji (is this spelled right? ;D)

                        It's called Hepburn/hebon shiki. It's like that:

                        ou means long o, uu (like in yuudansha) means a long u.
                        ei (like in rei) is often (but I don't know/think if/that always) read as a long e.
                        Something like this. (That's not everything, but it's the most important)
                        I don't really know if this is perfectly right, but it should be ok.
                        Hepburn is just one system. If it were truly "universal," it would be used universally.

                        It's not though . Some people use phonetic symbols to indicate long vowels. Others write longs vowels the same way you would short vowels (see the title of this post). Moreover, the romaji spellings Japanese kids learn in grade school do not accurately represent foreing pronuciations--eg., 松本 becomes "Matumoto", despite the fact that Japanese has not "tu" sound.

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                        • #13
                          Who gives a toss? Your comment was 0% relevant. Iggy's remark was more appropriate than yours.

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                          • #14
                            Zero percent schmeero percent. Inquiring minds want to know.

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, I asked a question but you couldn't aswer that...

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