Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sticker-symbol on some Do's?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sticker-symbol on some Do's?

    I've noticed some Kendoka have a small sticker-symbol placed on the top left-hand side of their Do. All I know is they come in various shapes and colours. What do they represent?

  • #2
    In some dojos yudanshas wear those stickers, but I don't know about the different shapes etc maybe it's dojo specific

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, most are the 'mon' or badge of their dojo. I saw loads of different ones at a recent seminar, cos obviously there were loads of dojos represented.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yep... as BanzaJoe-San says... this is the 'Mon' (Crest) of their dojo typically...but could be a family Mon if the Kendoka has one...

        cheers

        crabbi

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Reubino
          I've noticed some Kendoka have a small sticker-symbol placed on the top left-hand side of their Do. All I know is they come in various shapes and colours. What do they represent?
          There are two or three long threads on this topic. Unfortunately, since the search engine won't look for a word as short as "mon" you need to try "kamon" and maybe limit the search to the bogu forum.

          You'll find threads like:

          http://kendo-world.com/forum/showthr...ighlight=kamon

          Comment


          • #6
            A kamon is a family crest - used much as a coat-of -arms was used in centuries past in Europe. They are often based on geometric shapes (diamons, circles, etc.) or items from nature (birds, trees, leaves etc.). Formal kimono for both men and women may feature the kamon in certain locations (back, both sides of chest, or sleeves).

            Some Japanese kendokas put their kamon on their do - it's just another way to personalize your equipment. If a westerner has a do with a kamon on - the do was either acquired used from a Japanese person who had their crest put on it, or if they bought it new, they just thought it looked cool and asked the bogu manufacturer to attach a kamon they liked there.

            Do a google search for "kamon" (maybe under images as well) to see a few charts of common Japanese family crests.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another possibility is that they have permission from their instructor to wear the instructor's kamon.

              Comment


              • #8
                Niel,

                Yes, I know, but I haven't personally come to any decisions about how I feel about that particular practice. Even if some ueberkendomeister would expressly allow me to wear his kamon, I don't think I would. I would personally much rather carve out a name for myself in the kendo world recognizing that I will never wear a kamon on my do (as I am not Japanese) than bear the crest of some family to whom I owe no allegiance.

                This relates to the discussion about the zekken. As foreigners, we don't use kanji (unless we are perhaps Chinese or Korean) in our own names. I think it's kind of the same.

                The only possibilies I could really see in wearing a kamon as a foreigner is really the circumstance of being given a do from someone (at which time it might be disrespectful to remove the kamon in addition to leaving a noticable blemish on an otherwise nice do, but I would still ask if I should remove it), or the unusual circumstance of being adopted into a Japanese family as a son to continue a family name that has no male heirs. In such a circumstnace, it would be appropiate to use the family kamon, as the man would have changed his family name to a Japanee one (never heard of this happening outside of Japan or to a foreigner in specific, but it is a possibility).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Way back in the day, one of the wacked out Auzzies who attended the Summer Kendo Semminar with me used the "No Fear" logo as his kamon.

                  Taken to its extreem I could see kenshi selling ad space on thier do ala Moto GP bikes. ;-)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dnakase
                    Way back in the day, one of the wacked out Auzzies who attended the Summer Kendo Semminar with me used the "No Fear" logo as his kamon.
                    Hey, I met that guy! Wasn't he doing nito? Can't recall, it was over 10 years ago.
                    Originally posted by KevinF
                    I would personally much rather carve out a name for myself in the kendo world recognizing that I will never wear a kamon on my do (as I am not Japanese) than bear the crest of some family to whom I owe no allegiance.
                    As this usually is the crest of your sensei, I'd suggest that this is a person to whom you owe your allegiance and you should be proud to wear his kamon.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For those who have read Darrell Max Craig's book, "The Heart of Kendo", he mentions that his sensei had "adopted" both Darrell and his son into the Chiba clan. By being adopted, they were now required to wear the kamon openly, since by being adopted into the clan, they were also responsible for bringing no shame or dishonor upon the clan.

                      If one were to have been adopted into a clan, I see no reason why they couldn't (or shouldn't) wear the kamon on their bogu. From my own understanding, though, it's traditionally worn on the gi, not the do.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Neil,

                        First of all, sorry for mispelling your name. I think I've done that a few times...

                        "As this usually is the crest of your sensei, I'd suggest that this is a person to whom you owe your allegiance and you should be proud to wear his kamon."

                        I'm sorry, but I just don't think we live in an age where people are adopted into "clans" anymore. Were we living during another time, I might feel differently about it. I can understand a gift of a do, or using a spouse's crest - but I don't think I would willingly adopt or use another family's kamon. If I were given a do from a teacher with a kamon on it, I might not remove it, but I would not have one placed on a new do after it became unusable with time. Moreover, I have had too many teachers who have had lasting impacts on me to choose one above all others or to accept such an honor were it offered.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've had the same sensei for nearly 22 years. I don't need to be adopted to feel loyalty.

                          As far as being adopted into Japanese families - still happens, KW's Hyaku is an example.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            whatever floats one's boat i guess.. when i was playing pipes, i wore macleod tartan for over 20 yrs. our band belonged to their clan and we were member of that band, so that tartan was my colour for the duration. i still like that tartan.. not the macleod of lewis.. but of harris.. i was one of their piper, and i was allowed to wear the colour..

                            and yes, i was loyal to the clan to a point.. i don't think loyalty goes out of fashion.

                            pete

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As I do not plan on putting my elaborate european family crest on my do, if my sensei offered to let me where his Kamon, I would be greatly honored. Moreso because my zekken has my last name. It does not show any disrepsect to my lineage.

                              Sometimes, I even contemplate asking if it would be OK that when he is no longer with us, if I may wear his Kamon to carry on his spirit. But how morbid is it to ask that question?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X