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  • Kenshi or Kendoka

    hello,

    I never made a big thing about it. sometimes I used the word kenshi and sometimes kendoka.

    Since a very important sensei nearby started a thread with one of our students I would like to hear your opinions about it.

    What should be the right expression to describe us, who we are practicing the art of kendo in our dojos?

    kenshi or kendoka?

    best regards

  • #2
    Originally posted by bluerecords
    hello,

    I never made a big thing about it. sometimes I used the word kenshi and sometimes kendoka.

    Since a very important sensei nearby started a thread with one of our students I would like to hear your opinions about it.

    What should be the right expression to describe us, who we are practicing the art of kendo in our dojos?

    kenshi or kendoka?

    best regards
    when i refer to myself, i used kendoka. if i'm referring to anyone else, i use kenshi.

    pete

    Comment


    • #3
      FWIW I recall some years ago my (Japanese) sempai mentioning that nobody in Japan uses the term "Kendoka".

      I used to get upset at the appellation "kendo player" as I don't believe one "plays" kendo (in the same way that you play tennis or golf). These days I use the term myself as I can't think of anything more apt.

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      • #4
        I think kendoka is correct 100%ly.

        But kenshi somehow feels romantic to me, so I like to use it from time to time ;D

        Comment


        • #5
          There was a discussion here about this already:

          http://www.kendo-world.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11233

          No really real conclusion there, either, but the trend seems to go against using "kendoka".

          And as in all questions of international importance, where one can't get a definite answer, personally I would avoid japanese terminology that I'm not super confident I know what it means (so basically ANYTHING japanese) with japanese people I've never met before.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think we've had some interesting discussions before about 'playing' kendo.
            In what way don't we play it the same way as, say golf? I'm just thinking out loud here, not sure if I agree with myself yet, but golf has its own rules of etiquette, its own terminology, lots of people find it relaxing or what not. I wonder if it's fundamentally not that different to kendo in a lot of ways...

            Hmmmmm...

            To answer the question though, I've always used kendoka. Partly because I think kenshi (working on the translation of 'swordsman' or thereabouts) isn't always very accurate as a lot of kendo practitioners would probably have no contact with swords.
            Also, kenshi always makes me think of Mortal Kombat (in which he is, incidentally, the best character).
            Last edited by kartoffelngeist; 7th December 2006, 12:59 AM. Reason: spelling

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            • #7
              In Spanish

              in spanish the word "kendoka" makes people relate it to kendo. it would be the result of the castellanization of the terminology ex. karate-karateca.

              So kendoka, sort of makes sense as to describe in spanish a kendo practitioner.

              But as stated earlier, kenshi sounds more nostalgic, historical, romantic, etc....

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              • #8
                Kendoka or Kenshi

                I agree Kendoka is 100% correct the word kenshi I think more of a swordsman that is not of samurai nobility. But far as I checked there technically aren't any real samurai in the age we live in now. Don't get offended I mean samurai in literally having a shogun, daimyo,lord and all historical samurai stuff. I have heard the word kenshi sometimes used but generally by people who practice more than one sword art. Kendo, iaido, batto-do, bushido, etc.

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                • #9
                  I don't make a difference between kendoka and kenshi. I don't like kendoist though...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've seen similar discussions on aikido forums when asking about whether people should be called aikidoka or not. A common thought in that discussion was that the suffix -ka in Japanese is usually used to refer to someone who does that as their profession. So a professional aikido teacher would be an aikidoka but an amateur would not. I suppose that likewise a kendoka might be something used for a professional kendo teacher. Not sure though not speaking Japanese myself.

                    Mike

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ScottUK
                      I don't make a difference between kendoka and kenshi. I don't like kendoist though...
                      I dont see why anyone should dislike this word, other than it sounds a little wierd. It is taking the word, and putting and English ending to it. Ka and shi are not english(obviously Kendo isn't an english word either.....), while ist is. Kendoist, Kumdoist, ect. It makes sense, to a degree. My Sabaunim actually uses it. He say's Kumdoist, and just like other mentioned, Kumdo/kendo player, just doesn't realy work well, because we dont play. We fight to the death.
                      Last edited by ahmed61086; 7th December 2006, 06:07 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ahmed61086
                        because we dont play. We fight to the death.


                        Because there can be only one highlander!

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                        • #13
                          I preffer kenshi because it has a deeper meaning: knight of the sword

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Po5i
                            I preffer kenshi because it has a deeper meaning: knight of the sword
                            I think you may have read one too many manga.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              How about Shinaist, like the Duke in "The Shootist"?

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