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Kakegoe vs Kiai

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  • Kakegoe vs Kiai

    Shodan test coming up and would appreciate some collective wisdom on how to talk about the difference between Kakegoe vs Kiai

  • #2
    The ZNKR publishes a little booklet with all the answers to questions they give you. Copy it from one of your mates or go buy it. Memorize the answers and write them down as is. At this point they are not interest in your level of understanding as they are interested in how well you can memorize the answers. Check out the "Grading", Nanbanjin translated a handful of cheat sheets and I think shodan was one of them.

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    • #3
      Found it thanks!

      Here is another one though that I didn't ... "How is kendo different from other sports"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ramen View Post
        Found it thanks!

        Here is another one though that I didn't ... "How is kendo different from other sports"

        "In kendo, the use of a shinai is the primariy tool of participation. Without the shinai, there is no kendo.
        The shinai is made of four slats (take), which are held together by three pieces of leather -- the tsukagawa, the sakigawa, and the nakayui. All three pieces are joined and secured with a tsuru (string).
        The nakayui is tied about one-third of the way down the shinai from the kensen (tip), which holds the slats together and also marks the proper striking portion of the shinai (datosubu).
        Inserted between the ends of the slats, under the sakigawa, is a plastic plug called the saki-gomu. Inside the tsukagawa, there is a small square piece of metal (chigiri), that secures the slats as well.
        Most shinai are made of dried bamboo, although some are also made from carbon fiber.

        Aside from shinai, kendo participants also wear a large, pleated pant known as hakama. As well, a thick "jacket" known as a keikogi is worn, the thickness of which is to help protect areas of the torso otherwise not protected by the armor, termed "bogu."

        Participants of American football, European football (or soccer), baseball, basketball, volleyball, badminton, ping pong, tiddly winks, curling, arm wrestling, auto racing (including NASCAR, Formula 1, and Indy racing), and so forth, do not use shinai as a tool of the sport, nor do they wear hakama or keikogi."

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        • #5
          i would have answered that kendo is not a sport


          and then gone into an explanation of why...i wont do that here, but it's how i would answer

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tango View Post
            "In kendo, the use of a shinai is the primariy tool of participation. Without the shinai, there is no kendo.
            The shinai is made of four slats (take), which are held together by three pieces of leather -- the tsukagawa, the sakigawa, and the nakayui. All three pieces are joined and secured with a tsuru (string).
            The nakayui is tied about one-third of the way down the shinai from the kensen (tip), which holds the slats together and also marks the proper striking portion of the shinai (datosubu).
            Inserted between the ends of the slats, under the sakigawa, is a plastic plug called the saki-gomu. Inside the tsukagawa, there is a small square piece of metal (chigiri), that secures the slats as well.
            Most shinai are made of dried bamboo, although some are also made from carbon fiber.

            Aside from shinai, kendo participants also wear a large, pleated pant known as hakama. As well, a thick "jacket" known as a keikogi is worn, the thickness of which is to help protect areas of the torso otherwise not protected by the armor, termed "bogu."

            Participants of American football, European football (or soccer), baseball, basketball, volleyball, badminton, ping pong, tiddly winks, curling, arm wrestling, auto racing (including NASCAR, Formula 1, and Indy racing), and so forth, do not use shinai as a tool of the sport, nor do they wear hakama or keikogi."
            I'm curious - is this an "official" answer?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ramen View Post
              Here is another one though that I didn't ... "How is kendo different from other sports"
              I was checking out the Tokyo Renmei website and I couldn't find any about upcoming shodan shinsa or the questions. Are you testing somewhere else? I just wanted to check out the question in Japanese.

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              • #8
                Okay, Tango has covered some of the physical differences, but to Furanku-kun's point, I think we need something more conceptual. Here is an extract I found in Shambhala Guide to Kendo

                "With its special equipment and precisely defined rules, kendo fits the modern definition of a sport - a structured human activity carried out in leisure time for the purpose of recreating the human personality"

                "Kendo is different from other martial arts ... requires a shinai ... it is basically designed to perfect the kind of discipline necessary to cultivate alertness, speed of action and direct cognition. THese qualities require concentration rather than physical strength."

                "Although kendo is a sport, it does have one major aspect that differentiates it from Western sports: classical kendo developed under actual battlefield conditions where life and death were at sake, and under the influece of Buddhism.

                It goes on to talk about needing to conquer one own ego and tendency for self preservation, in order to make an all-out "go-for-broke" attach (sutemi). The how how one needs to discover mushin.

                "Whereas the foremost concern in Western sports is to respond to an external challenge and to defeat the opponent (or to break an existing record), the foremost concern in kendo is to tame the ego by internalizing the challenge."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by xvikingx View Post
                  I was checking out the Tokyo Renmei website and I couldn't find any about upcoming shodan shinsa or the questions. Are you testing somewhere else? I just wanted to check out the question in Japanese.
                  I'm guessing its being held in Shibuya (like we did for ikkyu). The question in Japanese is as follows (sorry can only type romanji):

                  Kendo wa hoka no sports to donna tokoro ga chigau to omouka

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