Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Good or Evil, and kendo's effect

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Good or Evil, and kendo's effect

    This questions may seem out of place but try to put it in perspective. Obviously being human there is always the potential for good or evil. While the high percentage of kendo practitioners are most likely positive being I was wondering if anyone had experienced the effects of kendo on a negative or mostly evil person? Do they change for the better and more positive or become an evil person that is that much more highly focused and in touch with themselves? Just wondering what some of your experiences with this if any might have been.

  • #2
    Define 'evil' for a start. Is that a capital E, Dr. Evil 'Evil', or your plain garden-variety asshole 'evil'?

    Outside of comic books you'll find it very hard to classify people in such black and white terms.

    As an example, a lot of people think George W. Bush is Evil, some think he's great, and some think he's just incompetent. Who's to say for sure?

    Comment


    • #3
      There is a movie called "sword of doom", it was shot in black and white, quite an out dated japense film with Mifune in it I believe. In it the main character was obsessed with this "evil kamae" (not to mention his ambition to become invisible) that he eventually became a product of this own ill-fated action.

      On the 2nd note, I disagree with your following statement "While the high percentage of kendo practitioners are most likely positive" Very "few" kendo students (from 6th kyu to hachidan) can truely say I have applied kendo to my everyday life.

      I think sometimes the line between evil and good is unclear. does the outcome justify your intention? or does your intentions justify the outcome? as they say the sum is greater than the whole.

      Comment


      • #4
        [QUOTE=Hamish]Define 'evil' for a start. Is that a capital E, Dr. Evil 'Evil', or your plain garden-variety asshole 'evil'?

        Outside of comic books you'll find it very hard to classify people in such black and white terms.

        QUOTE]

        Not exactly comic book evil but more modern day evil. Like the person who only looks for self gain with no regard to those who might be hurt in the process.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Masahiro

          On the 2nd note, I disagree with your following statement "While the high percentage of kendo practitioners are most likely positive" Very "few" kendo students (from 6th kyu to hachidan) can truely say I have applied kendo to my everyday life.

          I think sometimes the line between evil and good is unclear. does the outcome justify your intention? or does your intentions justify the outcome? as they say the sum is greater than the whole.
          You have a point there as I only assumed they applied it to thier everyday life but it is a competitive sport after all. It's like me saying most football players are most likely positive. The line that you describe depends on having past, present, and future data on a situation. To truly know if something were to be good or evil you would have to know every aspect of it's affect on every other thing for the whole of time. What you do now may seem like the right thing but spun from another angle it could be completely and utterly not that. It's always relative however your view on it is the only thing that counts where you are concerned, the rest is just outside speculation. It's simply tough to try to define a relative term.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think i'm evil. Kendo made me even more evil than before. My shinai is evil too.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kendokamax
              I think i'm evil. Kendo made me even more evil than before. My shinai is evil too.
              You I can accept being evil but your shinai? I mean it only does your will if you think about it. Unless you're suggesting that it has a mind of it's own. By the way how can kendo make you more evil? I'm just curious.

              Comment


              • #8
                you walk down the street and you mentaly hit every bypasser on the head.

                this is evil.

                shinai? my shinai is full of splinters. and I go tsuki a lot

                Comment


                • #9
                  All of our life experiences give us the opportunity to respond positively or negatively, IMHO. In the end its a question of character and how we choose to face the issues we confront in daily life. Yes, all of us probably fall short, but that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile quest.

                  In terms of kendo, it's the Satsujin-ken/Katsujin-ken dichotomy; does your sword (figuratively) take life or preserve it? I've met lots of great people of all skill levels and backgrounds in kendo, but I've also met more than a few who I'd characterize in less than positive terms. If the purpose of kendo is just to gain some ego gratification or win in shiai, then I would say that those are shallow goals that do nothing to achieve the real benefits that can come from honestly evaluating our abilities while striving for improvement in life as in the dojo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kendokamax
                    you walk down the street and you mentaly hit every bypasser on the head.

                    this is evil.

                    shinai? my shinai is full of splinters. and I go tsuki a lot
                    That's a lot of practice while walking down the street but that brings us to another good question. Being that you're a self proclaimed evil kendoist how would you say you're ranked at your dojo and or among kendoist peers? Hmm I still really don't see a shinai as evil even with splinters being that it still wouldn't do much harm in the way most strikes are done in kendo.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Goyaman
                      All of our life experiences give us the opportunity to respond positively or negatively, IMHO. In the end its a question of character and how we choose to face the issues we confront in daily life. Yes, all of us probably fall short, but that doesn't mean it's not a worthwhile quest.

                      In terms of kendo, it's the Satsujin-ken/Katsujin-ken dichotomy; does your sword (figuratively) take life or preserve it? I've met lots of great people of all skill levels and backgrounds in kendo, but I've also met more than a few who I'd characterize in less than positive terms. If the purpose of kendo is just to gain some ego gratification or win in shiai, then I would say that those are shallow goals that do nothing to achieve the real benefits that can come from honestly evaluating our abilities while striving for improvement in life as in the dojo.
                      That's a very well put answer to the question. Thanks, it makes me want to think heavily before getting involved in kendo. Perhaps other sword arts that aren't as competitive would be helpfull, but in any case this is about good and evil in the dojo and so far from reading into the answers I've gotten perhaps the outlook isn't so positive, maybe just more of a sport thing. If that makes any sense.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the feedback...
                        However I don't want to give the wrong impression, and I didn't want to dissaude you from doing kendo. While it's true that kendo does have a strong "sport" aspect, there's much more to it than that, and it has a lot to teach us--if we're willing to be aware of the lessons. My point was just that approaching it superficially won't generate those benefits.

                        After lots of nights of drinking with many sensei over the years, I've come to appreciate some of the deeper applications of kendo into daily life. Obviously, it's a path that has no end, but it really can give a lot back to you if you're willing to train with a sincere frame of mind that doesn't get stuck on the superficial.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Goyaman
                          Thanks for the feedback...
                          However I don't want to give the wrong impression, and I didn't want to dissaude you from doing kendo. While it's true that kendo does have a strong "sport" aspect, there's much more to it than that, and it has a lot to teach us--if we're willing to be aware of the lessons. My point was just that approaching it superficially won't generate those benefits.

                          After lots of nights of drinking with many sensei over the years, I've come to appreciate some of the deeper applications of kendo into daily life. Obviously, it's a path that has no end, but it really can give a lot back to you if you're willing to train with a sincere frame of mind that doesn't get stuck on the superficial.
                          Actually your statments alone wouldn't have dissauded me however I have found that kendo just probably isn't for me. I do believe what you say about the mindset of the individual training being important to what they get out of the training. Still, what do you see more in your fellow practitioners? superficial or non-superficial approach

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Goyaman
                            After lots of nights of drinking with many sensei over the years, I've come to appreciate some of the deeper applications of kendo into daily life. Obviously, it's a path that has no end, but it really can give a lot back to you if you're willing to train with a sincere frame of mind that doesn't get stuck on the superficial.
                            Goyaman,
                            Soo true!
                            On the other hand, time you spend 2nd dojo can be very EVIL.
                            I always regret one (maybe two or three) extra beer(s) or scotch(s), morning after the 2nd dojo

                            ps. any member or sensei from Doushikai going to Shinpan Seminar at Houston? Dallas dojo is planning to bring 3-4 members.
                            Hope to see you there!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Our dojo doesn't approach kendo as just sport, so I think that generally my sempai and kohai are not thinking of it in those terms. Probably most people would say the same for their dojo too, and I think it comes down to a matter of relative emphasis in teaching. Although of course we train for shiai, our outlook is that this is one important but not all-encompassing aspect of kendo. The senior members are a core group of older members and some graduate students coupled with a traditional-style sensei, so this is a sort of shared value in the group.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X