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  • #16
    Originally posted by Darknails
    Hello..
    I'm 23 years old and have always been interested in Kendo somehow
    never got around to do it. And now I'm not sure if it's too late for me
    to start because I know a lot of people start during their teens, and
    if I do it I want to be GOOD. So is there anyone who can tell me
    whether it's possilble to become amazingly good (say winning
    tounaments) if one starts at such age. And how much time per week
    is normally required to practise to become that good?

    Please excuse my somehow naive questions.. thanks in advance
    You can be good in 12 months, or you can suck after 12 years, its right down to you. Of course your own general level of coordination and motor skills will determine what you have to work with in the beginning. But, determined people almost always do well in kendo. As for your age, your probably younger than the average North American who starts kendo...your age is not an issue.

    (I was 27)
    Enjoy!

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks

      Originally posted by Usagi San
      Hell, I started at 33. THAT'S OLD.
      Thanks for ruining my day. Im 31, 2 years to go before I have to retire.

      Best Regards,

      Louis
      young at heart

      Comment


      • #18
        Thanks to everyone who posted these messages! I started Kendo since two months ago and now becoming more and more involved, both physically and mentally. Though it took a year since I posted the original message, during which I felt I wasn't ready for it. Now I'm very focus and everyday looking forward to tame the shinai with my hands, making it do exactly what I want. All in all. I'm glad to have thought about it seriously and gave it a go. I've discovered a new world!

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by louisvandalen
          Thanks for ruining my day. Im 31, 2 years to go before I have to retire.
          Amateur . . . I left school before you were born, and I don't consider myself old . . . yet . . .

          Comment


          • #20
            Good for you mate.
            Originally posted by Darknails
            Now I'm very focus and everyday looking forward to tame the shinai with my hands, making it do exactly what I want.
            I like that, it's poetic.

            Comment


            • #21
              I started when I was 40 and now I'm 56. I don't think I have much chance of winning the WC but in 3 years I'll try out for the team again. Tried out for the AEUSKF team last year and was about 30 years older than the average age. Didn't make the team but you had to beat me to get on.

              Tame the shinai is nice, how about BE THE SHINAI

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Ignatz
                I started when I was 40 and now I'm 56. I don't think I have much chance of winning the WC but in 3 years I'll try out for the team again. Tried out for the AEUSKF team last year and was about 30 years older than the average age. Didn't make the team but you had to beat me to get on.

                Tame the shinai is nice, how about BE THE SHINAI
                I aim to make my opponent one with my shinai.

                Comment


                • #23
                  ^ Respect +1

                  It's never too old to start kendo, or any sort of budo. In the USYD kendo club, there are these guys who look around 50 years old who are starting. Bear in mind that I think they are experienced karate practioners, so consider that not only are they older than you, they are also working against training that has been drilled into their heads for years. If they cam put that kind of effort in kendo, I am very sure you can too

                  23 is quite young. I started when I was 18 , so we are not too far off. We're still young men with the fire of youth burning within our hearts! (heh...gotta love Naruto) Truth be told, personal skill and ability will be the factor in judging whether you will be good or not, but as long as you give it your all I'm sure you will enjoy kendo all the same.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I am an extremely ancient starter (41) and as for being "good", I will be absolutely thrilled with myself if I manage to not move my right foot before I see the tip of the shinai in front of me Never mind coordinate that with only lifting with the left, hitting centrally, kiai and gawd knows what else! I view the bogu wearing, fully coordinated state as being so distant as to be practically mythical.... yet enjoying it all immensely

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I started Kendo when I was 42. It was only because I didn't like to go to health center ( I hated threadmill ). Here I am trying to be Yon Dan this year ( I missed last year's because business trip ) but grade is only encouragement for ones with weak motivation. Real reward is your mental and physical health. I started Kendo to be healthy. Now I find myself trying to be healthy to continue my pursuit for Kendo. Go figure.. I'll be trying for Go dan when I'm 55 if all goes as planned but with no tournament victories..

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Dont start. There's always going to be somebody better than you.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I'm finding these stories so inspiring! Especially about the 80 and 60 year olds! Can I deviate a bit and ask people what they reckon progress is down to? I know it's not necessarily down to the amount of practice as I've heard of people who've done it for years and didn't progress much. So what is it? Natural talent? A good teacher? I'd be interested in your thoughts. By the way, my Shakuhachi teacher just told me that in Japan someone very dedicated to flute who had been playing for ages but was totally rubbish would have a lot of respect (he knew of someone like this), while someone who was excellent technically but didn't take it that seriously would not.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            "So what is it?"

                            Good teachers help. If you lack good teachers in your area (no aim at disrespect here), frequent trips to group practices where the good teachers are.

                            Good observation skills to learn stuff while watching, you can learn a ton if you are carefully observant. Lots of the training involves fine details and a good eye helps to pick up on that.

                            Practicing with many different people, not the same dojo and only that same dojo forever.

                            Dedication to attend as many practices as you can fit into your schedule. Although it is not so much quantity, because some people don't have much choice, but the consistency of your attendence.

                            Analyzing your strengths and weaknesses outside of the dojo. Practice doesn't end at the dojo. Whether it be in the car ride home or just after dinner or in the shower, whereever, it is important to try and analyze your own kendo. See how you should be applying your sensei's advice and try and find areas that you feel you need to improve on that were not mentioned. People who just practice and stop thinking kendo when they go home don't make as much progress as someone who spends some time after practice thinking how to improve on the days training.

                            There are tons of factors, but these are important in my opinion.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ekajati
                              I'm finding these stories so inspiring! Especially about the 80 and 60 year olds! Can I deviate a bit and ask people what they reckon progress is down to? I know it's not necessarily down to the amount of practice as I've heard of people who've done it for years and didn't progress much. So what is it? Natural talent? A good teacher? I'd be interested in your thoughts. By the way, my Shakuhachi teacher just told me that in Japan someone very dedicated to flute who had been playing for ages but was totally rubbish would have a lot of respect (he knew of someone like this), while someone who was excellent technically but didn't take it that seriously would not.
                              Obviously I'm completely unqualified to say anything about shakuhachi, but when it comes to kendo, people who practice for a long time seem to be treated with the utmost politeness, but generally passed over when it comes to being treated as any kind of authority. But that's just my experience.
                              On the way back from a Keio old boy practice last night I was talking to one of the guys who is always there, rain or shine. I would never have guessed this, but he said that after graduating university and starting work he quit kendo completely, only returning at the age of 60 when he retired. Since then he's had perfect attendance at kangeiko (8 days per year) every year for the 7 years since he restarted (he's now 67). I thought that was pretty cool.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Kingofmyrrh
                                Obviously I'm completely unqualified to say anything about shakuhachi, but when it comes to kendo, people who practice for a long time seem to be treated with the utmost politeness, but generally passed over when it comes to being treated as any kind of authority. But that's just my experience.
                                On the way back from a Keio old boy practice last night I was talking to one of the guys who is always there, rain or shine. I would never have guessed this, but he said that after graduating university and starting work he quit kendo completely, only returning at the age of 60 when he retired. Since then he's had perfect attendance at kangeiko (8 days per year) every year for the 7 years since he restarted (he's now 67). I thought that was pretty cool.
                                Oh yes, I don't think they would take the rubbish flute player as an authority, it was more that they deeply respected his/her devotion to their playing. And I do think your old boy is tremendously cool! Thanks Nodachi for your tips. From what I've learned having to undo bad habits in Shakuhachi, the lesson I would transpose for myself onto kendo would be that if the sensei tells you to do something, take it very seriously and do your utmost to do it - don't nearly dismiss it as a nice idea to do sometime (I'm speaking to myself...)!

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