Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Frustration..the evil circle.. Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Frustration..the evil circle..

    Sometimes in keiko I get really frustrated...and then I try harder and become stiff and slow, only to get even more frustrated..in the end I just want to cry.

    I guess some of you must have felt the same..how do you snap out of it?

  • #2
    Keep your chin up!

    I know just how you feel... I thought I had been steadily improving (especially in the last few weeks), which I was very pleased with, but then I was brought back down to earth just last night at training by my sensei. He cautioned me about my lack of tenouchi in my cuts, etc, etc... and even though he said this not to put me down but to actually encourage me to train harder, I did feel a little "depressed" afterwards as I kind of thought my recent efforts were not paying dividends...

    This morning, I woke up and thought to myself "there's no point in feeling upset... just try to get it right from now on and move on". Now, I can't wait until my next training.

    I think persistence and the will to not give up at all costs is the answer. Good luck tantadi!!

    Comment


    • #3
      I take a deep breath. I tighten up my shoulders and back, visualize the tension in my shoulders and in my mind as a color, then I push it all down into my hara while exhaling and settling into chudan no kamae. Then I visualize a laser beam fueled by that tension in my tanden shooting up through my left hand up my shinai out the kensen and into my opponent's tsuki-dare. That last bit is a visualization that I have often used in trying to strengthen my center, and using it helps me refocus on my opponent and away from my tension. That is how I deal with it during keiko.

      The circle of frustration is harder for me to deal with is the plateau that develops every few years. A little voice in the back of my head tells me that I am wasting my time and will never really "get it." I have to tell myself that it is just fear/uncertainty/doubt talking and to just keep practicing. But to get past the plateau usually requires me to work more on basics, which aggravates the feeling of frustration, since it feels like taking a step backwards. Oh well.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi All,



        Im new to kendo as well as this forum. Ive been practicing a little over 3 months now and I feel Ive been making good consistent progress not leaps and bounds by any means, but good for a beginning student. But even at times when I think Im on the right track, things at times do not go quite as I planned.



        Within the past few weeks I managed to score a point on two senior students, something I had not been able to do since I started. The best part was that they were clean strikes with good Zanshin. I was elated but then two nights back I could not hold my own in keiko against another beginning student. I left the dojo disappointed but went home, had a good nights sleep, and told myself the next morning that I would work on my mistakes and to learn and get better.



        I think that is the beauty of this sport and the reason why I am so in love with it. Skill is not something that happens over night and even when you believe you are making progress, you realize that you have so much more to learn. Sparring with different participants opens your eyes to just how expansive and ever evolving the learning curve in Kendo is. Its an extremely humbling blow to the ego and one that separates those who are willing to push forward from those who choose not to.

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the laser beam visualization...tried it today practicing men cuts at home, trying to relax the shoulders. I'll try it in keiko, thanks.

          Mecha: Three months and scoring points, then you are doing good!

          The feeling of frustration luckily goes away quite fast after training, maybe thats what differentiates those who continue to do kendo from those who don't...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tantadi
            Sometimes in keiko I get really frustrated...and then I try harder and become stiff and slow, only to get even more frustrated..in the end I just want to cry.

            I guess some of you must have felt the same..how do you snap out of it?
            I know exactly how that feels. Remember, most, if not all of those in bogu, have felt this way. There were nights where the only things I could bear were gritting my teeth and trying to hold my kamae in at least a decent position. My father told me when I began that he has seen many kendoka when he was a kid in Japan break down and cry during keiko because of this feeling. It's a terrible feeling... But that's just another mountain to climb in kendo so keep working at it and I'm sure more important matters will take precedence and you'll have something propelling you. Good luck and I hope this helps.

            Comment


            • #7
              Tatandi: Try these:

              1. Relax shoulders, make sure posture back is straight, with feeling of measuring up with your opponent.

              2. Look at opponents eye.

              3. Remember concept of mu (no mind, watch last samurai, there's an example there, in slow motion too).

              4. Breath deep and kiai.

              5. get ready cos anything is possible

              That is true, there's few guys I ji geigo with, sometimes when I get a target, they try to gather more energy by kiaing really loud..and they're whole body tenses up even more especially around the shoulders..their eyes are flaring..they are so stiff I can get them with men..and they wouldn't know why it got through.

              Comment


              • #8
                Have to agree with above. Some of my best 'use the force luke' moments have been when I was at my most frustrated and told myself 'no mind'.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I know the feeling, my kendo feels so stiff and slow when I watch the other people in the club. Kakari-geiko sometimes help, after a while you just don't have enought power left for any unnessesary tension. I often feel that my best kendo comes when I'm really tierd. Try to concentrate on doing one thing right each practice instead of trying to be the Miyamoto Musashi. Concentrate zanshin one practice and good kiai the next and so on. That way you can keep the negatives thoughts away, I hope.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NorthernKendoka
                    I know the feeling, my kendo feels so stiff and slow when I watch the other people in the club. Kakari-geiko sometimes help, after a while you just don't have enought power left for any unnessesary tension. I often feel that my best kendo comes when I'm really tierd. Try to concentrate on doing one thing right each practice instead of trying to be the Miyamoto Musashi. Concentrate zanshin one practice and good kiai the next and so on. That way you can keep the negatives thoughts away, I hope.
                    Repeat to yourself over and over: "Kendo is fun", "I love Kendo", "Kendo is part of my life". If none of that works; its time for a break to reassess your life.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I make lightsaber sounds when im frustrated.

                      Reminds me that im the ultimate weapon. Veewwww Vewwww.

                      Try using sound effects. lol. If that fails you, remind your self why your there. I didn't go to Kendo for the whole "I want to be enlightened" thing, rather to meet lots of people and to get fit. If im frustrated i just remember:

                      Hell, Im meeting lots of nice people, and im getting really fit.

                      So Kendo for me; works.

                      Technique and the rest of it come after that for me, but i always start the lesson well, and when i can sit in seiza and meditate on what i learnt, i feel good. Because i cant put my Bogu away, have a glass of water in congregation with some nice people, talk about all the suburi we had to do, and how nice eachothers cuts were, and keep on going till the next lesson.

                      Remember, if you can get out there; put men on, pull out your bamboo and take a strong stance; you are Miyamoto Musashi. (At least i think I am )

                      Keep the Peace

                      "Sword is nothing; Jo is everything"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "Because I can" not "cant": lol; sixth paragraph, line two: Mis Phrase:

                        Peace

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Do you guys and gals remember what Ishida sensei wrote in his hachidan written exam? That the mind must be flexible etc. There is no such thing as kendo perfection. Each time I step into the dojo, I know that there are always things to work on, to improve etc. The more I train, the more I realise that I have so many stuff to work on.

                          Everyone has their frustrations. They are annoying and depressing, but one day, when the lightbulb moment comes, it's going to be so much brighter and sweeter. Sometimes, we aren't given the opportunity to feel that we've succeeded, that our efforts have paid off. It all seemed so hard. Take a look at a tape of your keiko/shiai recorded a few months earlier. Chances are, the difference is night and day.

                          Personally, my senseis have made me feel frustrated. They didn't frustrate me per se, just kicked things up a notch as a way to egg me on and to bring me to the next level. I've learned that, when the going gets tough, you just keep at it and you'll get better, whether you realise it or not. Don't take frustrations negatively - take it as a necessary path to learning. There is no success without failure.

                          Ganbatte!
                          Last edited by Andoru; 21st May 2005, 08:55 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was trying to do it too good which made me tense. Things like breathing and relaxing were neglected.

                            A sempai tought us some breathing exersizes that you should use in kendo. Shinai up, breath in make strike, breath out in kiai. I know this sounds all natural for you all but I never tought about it like this before this class but since that point since I have been breathing this way I am way more relaxed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I get frustrated pretty often during waza practise on Thursdays...I can either do them or not do them...and it's really bugging me...so I take a day off from kendo..the next time I go for training..I'm all ready to learn it all over again..make sense?=P

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X