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On bad habits

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  • #16
    WHO cares what the answer is, I wanna know the question!

    Often I think I become aware of a problem at or slightly before the moment I solve it. OTOH, there are perennial problems that require constant vigilance, like keeping ego in check, using the left hand to power the shinai, maintaining (and extending/understanding more deeply) seme in all its forms to name three among many.

    b

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JByrd
      To identify the real source of the problem I usually have to be told the same thing at least three different ways, often by three or more different Senseis. It sometimes takes me a while to figure out that the diverse comments I get are really telling me the same thing. I have to question myself, synthesize, and put the puzzle together.
      I am the same way.

      I think the problem is that habits are, well, habits. So they exist in a blind spot. When people say to "use your left more" or something like that, one often thinks that they already are using it, so one just does the same thing but with more effort. Except that one is not really using it, so it doesn't work.

      Because of that, I find I need to hear things that cause me to come around to the problem from a direction that I was not expecting. For example, I made a lot of progress improving my left when I learned from weight training that your back muscles are responsible for pulling strength. That eventually gave me a whole different way to think about the left hand, and I finally realized in what way I was not using my left, even though I always thought I was.

      Sometimes, given enough diverse input, I can figure out a way myself. Sometimes, it is just 1 hint that is like magic. But I find, personally, that I never really figure out bad habits from the direct approach.

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      • #18
        There are three ways that I have discovered for correcting bad habits.

        - My teacher telling me about my bad habits really helps, and I try to get feedback from lots of different people.

        - Going outside my regular dojo and fencing against kendoka I don't know. Even if they are really strong or just beginning they always show me something I miss in regular training.

        - I do suburi in front of a mirror, imagining my reflection was someone else. What would I correct? Doing lots of suburi is also helpful on discovering the correct technique when the strength goes.

        Another way is bragging to my wife about how good my kendo is, and having her shoot me down

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        • #19
          ...Today I was reading this book about sports psychology. In particular there is a chapter about improving performance by setting goals. Where the goals should be:-

          Specific - Not just "try harder", but identify specific goals which tell you exactly what you working towards.

          Controllable - Performance goals are more preferable to outcome goals, which depends on the performance of others (like competition, etc.)

          Challenging - A challenging goal provides satisfaction when it is achieved.

          Attainable - Goals should be realistic i.e. attainable, because it is the achievement of the goal that inceases performance and motivation.

          Measurable - The book gives an example of performance time in an athlete. Personally I think this goes back to videotaping yourself as something you can measure, check and recorded. You maybe working on your left foot, but you may also need to see it to now how has been improving.

          Personal - Goals should relate to your personal needs, ability, self-confidence, etc.

          HTH. I am quite inspired tho

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          • #20
            Originally posted by mingshi
            ...Today I was reading this book about sports psychology. In particular there is a chapter about improving performance by setting goals. Where the goals should be:-

            Specific - Not just "try harder", but identify specific goals which tell you exactly what you working towards.

            Controllable - Performance goals are more preferable to outcome goals, which depends on the performance of others (like competition, etc.)

            Challenging - A challenging goal provides satisfaction when it is achieved.

            Attainable - Goals should be realistic i.e. attainable, because it is the achievement of the goal that inceases performance and motivation.

            Measurable - The book gives an example of performance time in an athlete. Personally I think this goes back to videotaping yourself as something you can measure, check and recorded. You maybe working on your left foot, but you may also need to see it to now how has been improving.

            Personal - Goals should relate to your personal needs, ability, self-confidence, etc.

            HTH. I am quite inspired tho
            This is one of the best posts I've read on this forum! Everybody should read this book! The point on being "specific" is brilliant. I used to go to a dojo where someone would say "there is something wrong with your suburi" then not tell me what it was. I was frustrated for years, then I started training with Yanai sensei and he told me immediately, and I was able to change it.

            It may be worth noting that these points aren't just for sport\budo. I used to get taught these techniques as good ways to train people way back when! Still relevant now!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mingshi
              Today I was reading this book about sports psychology.
              What is the title of the book, if you don't mind sharing?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by mingshi
                ...Today I was reading this book about sports psychology. In particular there is a chapter about improving performance by setting goals. Where the goals should be:-
                This I pretty much always do: I set a couple of main (hard) goals every year (look for the posts here), a couple of medium ones and some short term ones.
                Granted, they will mutate somewhat depending on the progress and other interference, but it really helps having an overall (realistic) goal for the year, medium and near future.

                Jakob

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                • #23
                  Do "second dojo" goals count, too? E.g. Move on to second pint within 30 seconds.

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                  • #24
                    well, as jmarsten would say: practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by piggy
                      practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect.
                      Ok, then, how do you ensure that you are doing a perfect practice?.

                      Jakob

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JSchmidt
                        Ok, then, how do you ensure that you are doing a perfect practice?.

                        Jakob
                        I think you need heaps of perfect practice practice to get practice perfect.

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                        • #27
                          practice in front of a sensei and practice your moves very, very slowly rather than fast and sloppy.

                          thats perfect practice.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by piggy
                            practice in front of a sensei and practice your moves very, very slowly rather than fast and sloppy.

                            thats perfect practice.
                            I'm sure for the more experienced amongst us, fast doesnt necessarily have to be sloppy...

                            Not for me however! I'll stick to my slow and steady for now!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by piggy
                              practice in front of a sensei and practice your moves very, very slowly rather than fast and sloppy.

                              thats perfect practice.
                              If I practice very very slowly in front of my sensei, I will get hit umpteen times and told off for slacking off.

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                              • #30
                                why do it fast when we can do it slow and decrease the chances of making bad foot work or strikes?
                                also, our senseis emphasize that we need to do it slow at first to get the hang of what were supposed to do and do it perfectly before we do it fast. if your sensei does not like that, you could tell them what you are intending or just not do it at all...
                                so close to 100 posts...

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