Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

There are no kendo dojos anywhere near me...

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Well if you're just planning on quitting in 2 years, what's the point? Why not continue with your judo practice until such time as your schedule and location permit you to take up kendo seriously?

    Comment


    • #17
      No, I mean that I won't be able to do kendo in Halifax for another two years. I could still practice on my own.

      Comment


      • #18
        What you said is that you anticipate that you may not have time to practice in Halifax while in school. I agree with that, we get lots of uni students who start but then quit due to time commitments. I think frankly your time is better put into your judo practice.

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm the captain of a club in Tulsa, OK that's around 120 miles away from the only dojo in the state. You really should throw out the notion that going to a club to practice is a waste of time if there is no sensei around; you can learn a great deal from your peers at any level.

          And just to put this out there, the reputation of the Halifax club is pretty damn good. Those guys are serious business, and if you really really want to do this then man up, endure the drive, and go meet them to practice. Otherwise, do what the Spaminator says.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
            What you said is that you anticipate that you may not have time to practice in Halifax while in school. I agree with that, we get lots of uni students who start but then quit due to time commitments. I think frankly your time is better put into your judo practice.
            I am quite studious, so what I might do is try to attend the classes first year and see how it goes. I'm planning on taking classes in Halifax for at least four years at a couple of different universities, things may get better in time.

            Originally posted by EndureForte View Post
            I'm the captain of a club in Tulsa, OK that's around 120 miles away from the only dojo in the state. You really should throw out the notion that going to a club to practice is a waste of time if there is no sensei around; you can learn a great deal from your peers at any level.
            I understand that, and I would be more than happy to attend their classes.

            Originally posted by EndureForte View Post
            And just to put this out there, the reputation of the Halifax club is pretty damn good. Those guys are serious business, and if you really really want to do this then man up, endure the drive, and go meet them to practice. Otherwise, do what the Spaminator says.
            It all comes down to the fact that Halifax is three hours away, and costs a good chunk of gas money to get to. Classes at the club are Tuesdays from 7:00pm to 8:00pm and Thursdays from 7:00pm to 9:00pm... so that would be a six hour round trip for an hour or two of class. Even on summer break, I can't do that.

            Basically I might just have to give up for a while, which really really bugs me. I hate leaving things half finished.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Chozo003 View Post
              Basically I might just have to give up for a while, which really really bugs me. I hate leaving things half finished.
              Well, it's a life-time project, and you haven't started yet, so half-finished is maybe a stretch. Just wait a couple of years. You might not even like it.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
                Well, it's a life-time project, and you haven't started yet, so half-finished is maybe a stretch. Just wait a couple of years. You might not even like it.
                That is true, I suppose I can always catch up in later years. However, I'm quite certain it's something I want to do, and I definitely can't bring myself to drop the thing altogether for two years.

                I think I'll stick around here, until the time comes that I have the chance to join a dojo. Pick up some terminology (shouldn't be overly difficult), watch as many instructional videos as I can lay my hands on, get to know everything I can without actually physically practicing kendo...

                Would you recommend I swing a shinai occasionally, just to practice what I've seen and get the feel of some strikes, or just refrain from practicing on my own at all?

                Comment


                • #23
                  No offense to Neil, but don't let people discourage you. I've trained with people in both law and med school, at my dojang. Some do get swamped by the schedule, but more than a few have stuck with it for the duration of their academic career. If you want to make time, then you can.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Yup, there are people who stick it out through school. I've frankly given up trying to predict who will stay and who will go. Guys like Chozo003 who are pumped about kendo and convinced that they will want to do it for life before they even stick a foot in the door are just as likely to quit as the guys who never heard of kendo before they saw the poster.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by b8amack View Post
                      No offense to Neil, but don't let people discourage you. I've trained with people in both law and med school, at my dojang. Some do get swamped by the schedule, but more than a few have stuck with it for the duration of their academic career. If you want to make time, then you can.
                      That's the plan. In the end, it's just a few hours every week. I have yet to find out just how much "a few hours" are worth during university, though... o_o

                      Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
                      Yup, there are people who stick it out through school. I've frankly given up trying to predict who will stay and who will go. Guys like Chozo003 who are pumped about kendo and convinced that they will want to do it for life before they even stick a foot in the door are just as likely to quit as the guys who never heard of kendo before they saw the poster.
                      I imagine so. That's why I figure that studying it intensively before ever stepping foot in a dojo may be beneficial to me.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
                        Yup, there are people who stick it out through school. I've frankly given up trying to predict who will stay and who will go. Guys like Chozo003 who are pumped about kendo and convinced that they will want to do it for life before they even stick a foot in the door are just as likely to quit as the guys who never heard of kendo before they saw the poster.
                        Wise words from an experienced sensei indeed!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Chozo003 View Post
                          I imagine so. That's why I figure that studying it intensively before ever stepping foot in a dojo may be beneficial to me.
                          It may or may not. I've met people who have done both and saw mixed results. Some who did study up on kendo and it's history (without teaching themselves anything mind you) did better initially and some were no different than those who knew nothing until they caught wind of it by chance. Everybody progresses diffrently and frankly, I think it's better to come in as a blank slate because you'll begin without any preconceptions of what kendo is and you build your foundation from rock bottom.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            The only correlation I have found with Kendo and quitting kendo is that people, especially college students in a college club, are much more likely to stay when they become part of a close group of friends in the club. It's more fun that way anyways when you travel to tournaments etc and drink after practice, etc.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Chozo003 View Post
                              That's the plan. In the end, it's just a few hours every week. I have yet to find out just how much "a few hours" are worth during university, though... o_o


                              I imagine so. That's why I figure that studying it intensively before ever stepping foot in a dojo may be beneficial to me.
                              dont want to put you off but if you cant do it properly, dont do it at all

                              if you are serious then you'll find a place or move somewhere where there is a place you can learn

                              reading is great but there is just no substitute for doing

                              in my experience teaching beginners, those who form preconceptions by reading / watching vids / doing other ma etc etc last about a week. thats a shame. Most of those who stay are curious but open minded


                              Neil is right - for you in your situation - in terms of preparing for kendo, study judo very hard indeed while you can

                              then when you find a kendo dojo youll be better equipped

                              good luck

                              (BTW if you did drive to halifax & stopped in a hostel / B&B just to make that practise, ill bet that someone would offer you a bed if you proved willing to make that effort. you just have to do it without asking for help first )

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                As a kumdo student myself, I wouldn't recommend attending any kumdo dojang that's not affiliated with KKA (Korea Kumdo Association). And as far as I know, there aren't ANY Haidong kumdo dojangs that belong to KKA - It's a totally different sword art.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X