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Mumeishi, is it good?

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  • Mumeishi, is it good?

    Hi, I'm looking at Kendo clubs right now, which is BKA registered.
    I am not yet 15, so the choice is very limited, eventhough I live in London, zone 2. (I'm 14 this month, if this helps)
    I've visited Wakaba, watched a lesson and tried a lesson, and quite liked it. But I think they may not exactly teach the basics with the utmost care. Theres also no one there my age, with students either much younger, or much older, so it's a bit awkward for me. (But the club is very friendly and the Senseis are nice)
    I am looking at clubs which teach under 15s, and Mumeishi seems to be a popular one.
    I have heard it is pretty good, but does anyone in this forum go there? Or has been there?
    I would like to know if their teaching is good, and the general things. The question at hand is: Is this dojo a good one to go to? Especially for a beginner?
    It is pretty far from my residence, but, if a dojo is good, traveling is worth the effort, no?
    Also, if anyone can suggest a good under 15s allowed club, which they, or someone they know has visited, please do so.
    Please don't just say Mumeishi or another club is good, but without any proof.
    I really want to join a club which is responsible, and will teach the basics properly. (Since we all know Kendo is based on that)
    Fast replies would be appreciated, as I am contemplating whether I should visit them tomorow.
    Thanks you!

  • #2
    Originally posted by WarriorArts View Post
    I've visited Wakaba, watched a lesson and tried a lesson, and quite liked it. But I think they may not exactly teach the basics with the utmost care. Theres also no one there my age, with students either much younger, or much older, so it's a bit awkward for me. (But the club is very friendly and the Senseis are nice)
    What do you base that accusation on?. Granted, I'm biased as I spent several years training and helping with teaching in Wakaba, but I can assure you that they teach the basics with utmost care and take care to fit everyone into the practice and one of the most experienced dojo's in the country with regards to youth kendo.

    Not that Mumeishi is by any means a 'bad' dojo, but I doubt that you'll find the extra distance worthwhile.

    Jakob
    Last edited by Neil Gendzwill; 12th July 2009, 07:50 AM. Reason: Fix quote

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    • #3
      Originally posted by WarriorArts View Post
      Hi, I'm looking at Kendo clubs right now, which is BKA registered.
      I am not yet 15, so the choice is very limited, eventhough I live in London, zone 2. (I'm 14 this month, if this helps)
      I've visited Wakaba, watched a lesson and tried a lesson, and quite liked it. But I think they may not exactly teach the basics with the utmost care.
      If you are barely 14 years old and yet good enough at Kendo to judge whether the teaching of a particular dojo includes "basics with utmost care," I doubt you need the advice of most people on here.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by WarriorArts View Post
        Load of rubbish
        That seems an awful lot for you to say and ask for someone who knows nothing about kendo. Wakaba is just fine as a club for beginners......and what the hell "proof" do you need that a club is good or not......? Testimonies? Certificates?

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        • #5
          You guys are too hard on the kid. He obviously just wants to meet kendo girls his own age. Cut him some slack.

          (I'm just assuming this is a guy from his user handle)...

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          • #6
            To all who has replied, I am terribly sorry to have caused offence in any way. I am not trying to say Wakaba is not a good club, in fact, I was just telling my friend how it would be a shame if I wasn't able to go there.
            You are right in saying a beginner cannot know if the club teaches well, and I should not sound so demanding. For everything I have said, I offer my humblest apologies.
            I said "Wakaba may not teach the basics with the utmost care", because, well, you're right, maybe it was because I didn't see enough of the school.
            But, when I went there, I was not told how to hold a shinai properly, (except reminding me of the right side up), or the motion of a basic cut except to raise arms, strike down and then where to stop. (No one told me about keeping the shinai straight behind my head, or my posture)
            Also, am I right in saying Kendo has a sliding movement? But the senseis were not stressing that to anybody...
            I think I may be being too judgemental here, because, after all, many students there are even much younger than me, and so the dojo teaches according to that.
            I am very new to kendo, so I am not clear on the teaching methods and ways of kendo/senseis. If anything I have said here is wrong, please enlighten me.
            Please don't take offence to anything I have said here, these are simply "a careless child sprouting words of carnage".
            But I have decided not to visit Mumeishi after all, and will carry on looking at clubs.
            Thank you to those who replied and reminded me of proper manners and respect.
            Again, I ask of your forgiveness.

            EDIT
            Sorry, but I'm not a guy. I am a girl. And... I have never been that into boys to want to go kendo to meet them. I simply enjoy sports not everyone does, that is a challenge, and will enlighten me in many things.
            Last edited by WarriorArts; 12th July 2009, 03:19 PM. Reason: new reply

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            • #7
              Originally posted by WarriorArts View Post
              EDIT
              Sorry, but I'm not a guy. I am a girl. And... I have never been that into boys to want to go kendo to meet them. I simply enjoy sports not everyone does, that is a challenge, and will enlighten me in many things.
              lol sorry about that.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by b8amack View Post
                lol sorry about that.
                It's alright. (It happens all the time, I'm used to it)

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                • #9
                  Hey buddy,

                  It sounds like from what you said that they taught you good basics. Any more than what they told you on that first night and you would probably get confused. If they told you 100 things you would try to do them all, and end up doing everything wrong. This way, they make sure you do some stuff right, and work from there. If you are worried they aren't telling you about your posture, then make sure it is nice and straight and hopefully no one will ever need to tell you. Copy the way other people are sliding their feet, you can learn a lot just from watching and copying what you see. It seems you are observant that you noticed those things, so good on you. They will teach you according to your own level, so don't worry if there are people younger or older than you, everyone will progress at the same rate.

                  Have fun and try hard at whatever club you choose to go to!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WarriorArts View Post
                    You are right in saying a beginner cannot know if the club teaches well
                    You have made valid observations. Not everybody is the same and it not a bad thing to look around for a club that suits you.
                    Some of the replies to your post are simply reactionary and I don't think you should take them to heart. Good luck with your kendo training.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you for the replies. I will carry on looking, and I will try my hardest. Your replies has been greatly appreciated.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Soldier Blue View Post
                        You have made valid observations. Not everybody is the same and it not a bad thing to look around for a club that suits you.
                        Some of the replies to your post are simply reactionary and I don't think you should take them to heart. Good luck with your kendo training.
                        Valid observations? I went to Wakaba for more than 5 years, and from where I was standing they were treating beginners just fine. To say her stuff after 10 minutes with them is reactionary. The OP should stick with them for a couple more sessions before making off hand judgements. The guys who run Wakaba are also very approachable, so before rubbishing their hard (voluntary) efforts on the interwebs wouldn't having a quiet chat with them work a little better?

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                        • #13
                          I visited Wakaba last year the day before my grading at Mumeishi. I thought it was brilliant. A fantastic family atmosphere were indeed there are quite a few children, younger than WarriorArts who practice but practice in such a way that I think some adult beginners could learn a thing or two about focus and dedication.

                          WarriorArts I think you would be missing out by not trying Wakaba more. They have a Naginata session before the kendo session, which is worth a look as they are few and far between in the UK. They also seem to get plenty of kendoka visiting from many of the London clubs so you're going to get a regular mix of high level practice once you get past the beginners stage, variety is the spice of life. Their practice also includes use of the facilities of the sports centre afterwards and if I recall was especially good value for a potential 3 hour lesson.

                          Of course I only had one practice there but I really enjoyed it. Give it another shot and if you feel a bit embarrassed about returning don't worry I stabbed my sensei in the eye twice in one of my practices years gone by and had to get over the embarrassment and return.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dwez View Post
                            I stabbed my sensei in the eye twice in one of my practices years gone by and had to get over the embarrassment and return.
                            ... Are you serious? Lol.
                            Yes, of course I will return, I really do like the club, especially how friendly they are, and they were especially patient with me, as I couldn't seem to be able to shout. ...
                            I am just in a bit of a panic right now, because only 2 clubs, Wakaba and Mumeishi, practices Kendo, is in London, and takes in under 15s. That's why I am a bit torn between which one to chose.
                            I really don't want to have regrets later on.
                            But again, I suppose I can always experience both clubs by going to both, switching every few weeks... Or just doing both Saturday and Sunday.

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                            • #15
                              well since the thread topic reads Mumeishi ,is it good? I'd say Hell Yes!
                              its what ,about 40 years old and the Mumeishi 3s is one of the strongest kendo championships in Europe.
                              There are other threads on that too.... and since the 3rd kenshi in this competition has to be a kid bout ur age, u know they don't neglect anybody

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