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Promotion Tests in Different Countries

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  • #91
    I think its pretty useles to say that people in Germany do this kind of kendo and people in some other country do this kind. Every person in Germany does different kind of kendo. Same goes with rest of the world. Everyone is unique.
    At least this is what I think...

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    • #92
      I'm hip to what you Deutschlandern are saying, it's just a different frame of mind for me, ein Amerikanischer. And, while I appreciate Chris' perspective, I think , sir, you could be a bit nicer. They didn't say their system was the "best," just different, and they didn't say they had "no heart," just not as much heart as a Japanese.

      Different strokes and all that.

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Genya
        I think its pretty useles to say that people in Germany do this kind of kendo and people in some other country do this kind. Every person in Germany does different kind of kendo. Same goes with rest of the world. Everyone is unique.
        At least this is what I think...
        True, but there is also a big chance that people of the same region have something that differentiates them from kendoka from other regions. This is not strange at all since they most likely will have trained for the same instructors, and picked up those instructors "style" of kendo. I mean, I am sure you could point at a person in your dojo and say "His kendo reminds me of <insert sensei or sempai here>'s kendo"

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        • #94
          Originally posted by Charlie
          I'm hip to what you Deutschlandern are saying, it's just a different frame of mind for me, ein Amerikanischer.
          Sorry, I can only compare the Japanese and the German system. I am not sure about the systems in other countries.
          Also I may only compare dan-grading, because I have never seen kyu-grading in Japan and I doubt that it is by any means unified.

          Hiki-Shiken:
          In Germany we usually do the written test before the examination and send it as a letter. In Japan it is usually done after the Shinsa. It is less work for the judges, who don't have to look through the tests of those who failed already.
          Shinsa:
          It is longer in Germany. A new recomendation from the DKenB (German Kendo Association) says it should not be longer than 1 minute but it often was, at least when I saw it. In Japan it is usually never longer than 30 Seconds what can be an advantage or disadvantage. Also in Germany you have to do an extra Oyo-waza- and Kakari-geiko-part. It adds a little bit more pressure to the examinee, but if you will pass the ji-geiko part you will probably not have any trouble here (depending on the examinant)
          Kirikaeshi:
          It is pretty much the same, maybe a little bit slower in Germany.
          Kata:
          As was written before in Germany all ten kata are required for shodan.

          I am not a examinant trained by either the German or Japanese kendo federation, so this is as much as I can say.

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