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Fifth dan written test cheat sheet

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  • #16
    ...Question 4 last installment...

    6. Tokubetsu-geiko

    Kan-geiko, shochu-geiko etc,; keiko that is performed at times of particular cold or midsummer heat.

    (1) Nurtures the endurance to overcome the hardships of extreme heat and cold.
    (2) Because this training is carried at particular times of year, make sure you plan and prepare sufficiently.

    Important points:
    Try and achieve goals without being discouraged by heat or cold, but be aware of welfare and don't compromise the health of students.

    End of Question 5!!

    Comment


    • #17
      6. Heijoshin

      Heijoshin is a "Heart that is always calm", or the state in which the human heart (spirit) should be. People tend to strive to achieve goals with their hearts, so maintaining a steady/simple heart is difficult.
      In kendo your movements are the result of reacting to your opponents as well as moving from yourself, which means that "heijoshin" is also technically very difficult.
      In kendo it is vitally important to practice basic training while maintaining a calm heart.

      Comment


      • #18
        7. Kigurai

        Kigurai is the quality of spirit that and dignity that eminates from one's self. Kigurai is the natural by product of maturing technique and trained spirit.
        When crossing shinai with the opponent, suprise and doubt that lead to a feeling of having lost before the fight has begun come about when you are overcome by your opponent's kigurai.
        If you try and immitate this kind of kigurai deliberately, if your technique and spirit are not sufficiently mature you will have the opposite effect of creating openings and you will be struck and it will be ugly to watch!!! Development of technique and strengthening of spirit are naturally manifested in kigurai, so kigurai is not something that can be achieved overnight.
        Kigurai is very different from pride or vanity. Vanity must be avoided at all costs in kendo.

        Comment


        • #19
          8. Tenouchi

          In kendo tenouchi is a combination of:

          (1) The grip of the right and left hand on the tsuka.
          (2) The application of strenght.
          (3) The level of tension in both hands at the time of striking.
          (4) The losening of tension in both hands after striking.

          (1) Method of gripping.
          The left hand is such that the little finger doesn't release the back of the tsuka. The right hand right up the tsuka to the extent that it doesn't touch the tsuba. Both hands grip the tsuka with the thumb, little finger and ring fingers. The elbows are not extended too much, and the tsuka is gripped lightly keeping all joints of both arms relaxed. The feeling in the wrists should be that of wringing a damp cloth, bringing the gap between the thumb and forefinger of both hands in direct line with the tsuru of the shinai.
          In an old kendo poem you can find the line "Right hand forward, left hand back, hold softly like wringing out a cloth".

          (2) Application of strength.
          The little fingers of both hands grip normally, and the stregth becomes less with the ring finger, middle finger and so on.
          In order to stop the end of the shinai from rising the thumbs are held down lightly. It is important that the tsuka is gripped lightly with the feeling of holding an egg. Don't put too much strength into the right hand or into the shoulders or arms. Strength should be sixty percent left hand and forty percent right hand.
          (The right hand is known as the "deputy hand").

          (3) Tension and release of tension in both hands.
          When striking, apply strength through tenouchi evenly to both hands. If you do this such that you do not favour one hand, balance will be achieved and the strike will be correct. At the time of striking the wrists of both hands are moved to the centre line, wringing inwards as of wringing a damp cloth, extending tendons sufficiently. After striking tension should be released immediately, returning to the original tension, so it is easy to continue with subsequent strikes.

          Comment


          • #20
            The first few questions seem aimed at people teaching kendo. It's what people of godan should make sure their students aren't doing.
            I`m sure Nanbanjin knows, but for your others -- in Japan you are not an adult kendo teacher at 5dan. No way. Im pretty sure you couldnt teach at university either (anyone want to confirm/deny?). The minimum a good 6dan, but usually its from 7dan.

            You can teach in school (ages 6-18) with a minumum grade of 4dan.

            Therefore, the "students" mentioned here are, in fact, children.

            Nanbanjin - cheers.

            Comment


            • #21
              From Ichinikai:

              何段以上が指導者という明確な規定はありませんが、一般的に「四段以上くらいが目安」って考えられていると 思いますよ(^^)

              "There is no strict definition of what grade signifies instructor level, but I think that it is generally considered that "About fourth dan or above is the standard"."

              I don't know how many times I've told people my grade and have been told "you can be an instructor from fourth dan".
              In practice you don't see many instructors heading dojos who are less than 7th dan. At schools you hear stories of kids being taught kendo by people of lower dans or even who have no instructor and have to train themselves.

              By fourth dan it seems generally accepted that you could in theory be an instructor. By fifth dan I guess you should start thinking about it serously. Given that it will be a good eleven years at least before you make seventh dan you will have given it a fair amount of thought by the time you put your understanding into practice.

              Hence the high level of quality of instruction in Japan.... ?

              Comment


              • #22
                Nanbanjin - Good Job, a post purely about kendo here is like a breath of fresh air. Thx j

                Agree with George, that is the case here in Japan; however I'd like to add, if you are training in a country/situation where the only instructor for miles is a sincere nidan - do not take this as reason for dicouragement. Work and grow together until you can widen your experience.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I just tested 3 dan in June so this WAY over my head for testing purposes but thank you for a good read.

                  With Best Regards,

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    The link to the Ichinikai post I quoted above is:

                    http://www5a.biglobe.ne.jp/~ichini/b...220242546.html

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                      8. Tenouchi
                      In order to stop the end of the shinai from rising the thumbs are held down lightly. .
                      Could you please expand on this?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by mark
                        Could you please expand on this?
                        I was really rushing when I did these.

                        剣先を揚げないようにするため、拇指で軽く押さえる。

                        剣先 Kensen

                        揚げないようにするため、 so it doesn't rise
                        拇指で with the thumb(s?)
                        軽く lightly
                        押さえる。 restrain

                        Maybe "restrain" is a better way of putting it than "hold down".
                        I'm confident that thumbs is plural.
                        Also, think of the thumbs as including the fat bit at the base of the thumbs. Maintain a little pressure in that area and you should be able to keep the kensen down. Or rather, if you lose pressure you will probably notice the kensen rise.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                          By fourth dan it seems generally accepted that you could in theory be an instructor. By fifth dan I guess you should start thinking about it serously............Hence the high level of quality of instruction in Japan.... ?
                          agreed that about 4dan you could generally be seen as "instructor" level, but I tend to see it as more of a "right, lets get serious" benchmark, and I am guessing that this is the standard thought about it. In practise - in Japan as you know - 4dan is still a pretty low grade and not an intructor level. You know fine well that you wont be taken too seriously in the kendo community at large. Hide-sans "4th dan and above" was still in relation to teaching at school.

                          You are right about many schools not having teachers are such (often someone will visit from time to time) and these generally run the classes by themselves. What worse is if the teacher in charge has zero kendo experience. If you are at one of these schools, however, you are probably not serious about kendo.

                          Ive a fair bit of experience teaching kids, from 6-15, and have been around kids from 16-18 a lot, so I think I am at least semi-qualified to comment. Ive just covered the vast majority of kendo practioners in Japan in one fell swoop.

                          The reason I commented in the 1st place is that abroad (not Japan) people tend to think that 4dan is where you are a teacher. If you stuck all those 4dans on a plane and flew them to Japan and stuck them in a dojo they would be in for a sore sore lesson in humility. Hopefully then they would fly back from whence they came and reaccess their ability to teach and their teaching methodologies.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I agree with everything you say except for the "Hide-sans "4th dan and above" was still in relation to teaching at school." bit.
                            The post was in direct reply to:

                            私は学校の部活で剣道を教えたりする、指導者ではなく
                            市や町の道場で剣道を教える指導者を目指してるも
                            のですが、何段を取れば指導者になれるのでしょうか?
                            知ってる方、お願いします

                            The position of the first comma is misleading, but this guy wants to teach at dojos outside of the school system.

                            Also, if we were going to fly all the fourth dans in the world-except-for-Japan to Japan, we should use two planes like with the Royal Family.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                              I agree with everything you say except for the "Hide-sans "4th dan and above" was still in relation to teaching at school." bit.
                              Ok, I admit it, I skim read. But still.... I think im on the ball, as you know.

                              Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                              Also, if we were going to fly all the fourth dans in the world-except-for-Japan to Japan, we should use two planes like with the Royal Family.
                              Dunno... if the plane crashed I dont think much would change. Besides, we wouldnt want to inflate their ego to Royal size proportions anyway... if they arent already.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Geez, George...whats bugging you..While I agree with some of your comments, your bitterness over non-Japanese kendo players seems rather high at the moment.

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