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Fifth dan written test cheat sheet

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  • #31
    Originally posted by JSchmidt
    Geez, George...whats bugging you..While I agree with some of your comments, your bitterness over non-Japanese kendo players seems rather high at the moment.
    We all feel that way sometimes. Most non-Japanese fourth dan players I know are actually pretty good. It's fifth/sixth/seventh dans that bug me.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by JSchmidt
      Geez, George...whats bugging you..While I agree with some of your comments, your bitterness over non-Japanese kendo players seems rather high at the moment.
      you are right!!! most of it stems from hanging out here (Japan+these forums) for the past few years (and wondering why the information and experiences presented in 1 do not match the other). ive been pretty good about NOT posting over these last 4 years, but somethings clicked in me recently. my kendo and my ideas about kendo have fundamentally changed. there are various reasons for this, and id be happy to explain some of them on your next trip!! im struggling with this change myself.

      somehow, ive felt the compulsion to post recently... i need to stop. thanks for pointing out ive my head up my arse.... i was waiting for someone to say it... best its from a friend!!!!

      i dont think im bitter, btw, its more.... a combination of frustration and a feeling of being cheated. i'll let you mull that one over!

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      • #33
        A little cyber stalking tells me you have pretty kendo. Maybe you're starting to build up some confidence. Also, testosterone levels will be up now ahead of the WKC.

        And thanks to all the people who gave me positive rep points for this thread.

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        • #34
          My experience with Japanese 4th dans is that they are technically pretty damn good and usually playing at a pace I don't see around here, so they kick my ass.

          But from a teaching point of view, they typically don't know much as they've never been given that chance. Here we start giving teaching responsibilities much earlier, because we have to. In Japan, your standard yondan guy is just another student in the dojo.

          We are fortunate enough to have a nanadan sensei in my club, but I know others who don't. Sometimes those clubs will have an import member due to an ESL program or other circumstance and really could benefit from the import taking a leadership role. But it's like pulling teeth to get them to do it because they don't have any experience, don't think of themselves as instructors, are not too comfortable taking the lead over people they consider as senior to them within the new club, and all that is compounded by being new to the country and the language.

          Comment


          • #35
            That's been our experience, too, Neil. We practice at a university dojo and obviously people come for grad school, teaching, internships, what have you. We have been fortunate to have several great visitors from Japan, Korea and other places. All have accepted the teaching/mentorship role we thrust on them very graciously. In fact, they have been willing to exchange kendo for practice in using the English language! I mean, the worst thing that happens is our visiting friend will be, like, "How can I say...? Mmm, to make the attack, you must... and then..."

            My sig at this forum for a while was "Make sense?" We had a great friend from Japan, yondan, and he would end a lot of his instructions or explanations with, "Make sense?"

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            • #36
              By the way, George, I have always, always appreciated your posts, and I do not want you to stop. Be as grumpy as you like, I and many others appreciate your perspective.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Kenshi
                you are right!!! most of it stems from hanging out here (Japan+these forums) for the past few years (and wondering why the information and experiences presented in 1 do not match the other). ive been pretty good about NOT posting over these last 4 years, but somethings clicked in me recently. my kendo and my ideas about kendo have fundamentally changed. there are various reasons for this, and id be happy to explain some of them on your next trip!! im struggling with this change myself.

                somehow, ive felt the compulsion to post recently... i need to stop. thanks for pointing out ive my head up my arse.... i was waiting for someone to say it... best its from a friend!!!!

                i dont think im bitter, btw, its more.... a combination of frustration and a feeling of being cheated. i'll let you mull that one over!
                George, I think I know what you are saying, but it will require a rather lengthy reply which I will try to get around to later (when I'm not working). I don't, however, think you should stop posting, as your experiences and thoughts are valuable.

                Jakob

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                • #38
                  note: i should be testing for 5 dan this year. i am pretty sure i would get it. but i dont really care about rank. i only got 4 dan so that i dont have to pay dojo dues.I was 21 when i got 4 dan.

                  out here kendo has gone the way of self promotion. Sensei want rank to show up others or to gain/maintain power. There are many 4 dans(in so cal) that are not given the chance to teach and grow because there are higher ranking sensei fighting among themselves for power. some are doing so well thast they just stay at the top

                  My own experience- when i first took over the dojo i was a 4 dan with no clue. I do have a college degree in education, but i only took a few "instruction of kinesiology" classes. I had to learn to train people the correct way. After my first year, my head was filled with questions. I wanted to to teach efficacy and skill, but balancing the two was difficult. My first year, i made the dojo do high level drills with little explanation(the just watch me teaching style). everyone became a little sloppy(a reflection of my self at the time) but they did well in shiai. The next year i worked on kihon and simple things. I worked on become well rounded and understanding yourself and your opponent.

                  Now things are much easier, i have grown much from being be able to teach in the dojo. As a younger 4 dan, everything about my kendo has changed after i started teaching. I think 4 dan would benefit from teaching a class for 2-3 years. When the time comes for m to step aside, i will, and i will be happy about it!!
                  Last edited by misterkurukuru; 1st November 2006, 12:41 AM.

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                  • #39
                    Getting a bit tricky here. Apologies in advance.

                    9. Jiri-icchi (Giri-icchi) 事理一致(技理一致)

                    Translating the characters "Ji" is "fact". In kendo this is technique, movement, and form.
                    In other words it is the working of "Feet, hands, sword (ken)". "Ri" is "theory" and "reason". In kendo this is "spirit" and "meaning (ri-ai)". In other words it is the working of the mind or spirit.

                    Kendo is said to be a study of both "ji" and "ri". It is necessary to practice efficient kendo that realises meaning and movement, mind and technique. Mind and technique should be trained as one.
                    Technique in kendo is large, strong, quick and light in action (movement). If this technique alone is improved without training spirit, reason, external and internal spiritual dynamics, it will not become an action that encompases both mind and technique. If this happens openings will occur in your mind and technique, and you will be struck. On the other hand, if you improve kendo "meaning" and spirit without technique, openings will appear in your movement and you will be hit by your opponent.

                    Therefore, in kendo you need to always train both spirityal activity (mind, spirit, reason), and physical activity (technique, hand and foot movement) as one, in the spirit of jiri-icchi.
                    Ji and ri are like two wheels of a cart or the two wings of a bird in that only when both have equal emphasis will movement become smooth, so kendo training requires empasis on both. Considering development of kendo, training with emphasis on both "ji" and "ri" will bring about the fastest improvement.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Kenshi
                      you are right!!! most of it stems from hanging out here (Japan+these forums) for the past few years (and wondering why the information and experiences presented in 1 do not match the other). ive been pretty good about NOT posting over these last 4 years, but somethings clicked in me recently. my kendo and my ideas about kendo have fundamentally changed. there are various reasons for this, and id be happy to explain some of them on your next trip!! im struggling with this change myself.

                      somehow, ive felt the compulsion to post recently... i need to stop. thanks for pointing out ive my head up my arse.... i was waiting for someone to say it... best its from a friend!!!!

                      i dont think im bitter, btw, its more.... a combination of frustration and a feeling of being cheated. i'll let you mull that one over!
                      course youre not bitter, youre just scottish :-)

                      and id say cracked not clicked !!

                      how are you doing georgi sensei ?

                      regards

                      phil..

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                        A little cyber stalking tells me you have pretty kendo. Maybe you're starting to build up some confidence. Also, testosterone levels will be up now ahead of the WKC.
                        hah hah at work now, so dont have time to reply.... i`ll just say one thing - i am not allowed to participate in the WKC as the BKA stipulate you must attend monthly squad training which is just outside London... a bit far to travel from Osaka every month. But yes, this inability to participate (despite being British and a fully payed up BKA member) has recently been making me more .... frustrated ... than usual.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                          9. Jiri-icchi (Giri-icchi) ??????????
                          Boy o boy. Some day I hope to be able to do both at the same time.

                          That is one good piece of knowledge there skippy.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            10. Shu-ha-ri

                            Translating the characters, "shu" is "to guard, to protect" or "to follow unquestioningly", "ha" is "to break, to tear down" or "to defeat" and "ri" is "to depart, to draw away" or "to break ties with".
                            In kendo, as a representation of levels of learning, "shu" is said to be the first step, "ha" is where the first stage is traversed and progress is made, and "ri" is where the stage of "ha" is surpassed and the student devotes himself/herself to developing his/her own style.

                            1. Shu
                            Until the student's kendo has developed to a certain level they follow their instructor's teachings faithfully, learning kendo theory and technique, and never learning other styles.

                            2. Ha
                            As kendo experience piles up, the student makes what they have been taught their own, and continue to progress and learn other styles, taking on the strengths of those styles and developing new areas that were unattainable in the stage of "shu", and thus making their kendo another level stronger.

                            3. Ri
                            Through rigorous training the level of "ha" is surpassed and the student finally discovers their own stage, creating their own style. In other words, the student masters the deep meaning of the sword.

                            "Shu-ha-ri" can be applied not only to kendo but also to ones way of life.

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                            • #44
                              11/1. Houshin

                              The word "houshin" itself conjures images of "a clumsy person" or "a bad person with no conscience", with a meaning of having let your heart loose and losing it, but in kendo "hoshin" is as in what was once called "to call in your wandering heart". In other words, you do not leave your heart loose, but find out where it wants to go and reign it back in.
                              If your heart is held captive, it will be like a tethered cat unable to chase a mouse when it appears. If you allow your heart to freely go where it wants when it wants, your whole body will always be aware, and your heart will be there and will fulfill its task whenever it is needed. Because of this you should allow your heart to be free.
                              In other words, "houshin" is desirable and necessary.
                              In kendo you should not shackle your heart, always allowing it to be free, so it can be there as soon as it is needed. Allow your heart to work as quick as lightning.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                11/2. Shishin

                                "Shishin" is on the face of it "to stop your heart", "a stopped heart", or "a captured heart".
                                In other words, "shishin" is to have one's attention captured by a single thing, and because of this to be unable to remain aware of other important things.
                                In kendo, "shishin" is to have your attention stolen by your opponent's attacking sword, becoming preoccupied with whether to block or deflect etc., thus becoming unable to execute your own techniques, and ultimately being hit by your opponent.
                                If you pay attention to one thing only, your heart will be trapped by that thing, and you will lose understanding of other thing.
                                Kendo teaching warns against "shishin" and encourages a heart full of "houshin", without any part that is in stasis.

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