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  • Sho-dan written test cheat sheet

    1. What is the purpose of kendo?

    Kendo is not a competitive pursuit involving hitting each other with shinai to determine a winner and loser.
    Kendo is a form of training to develop a correct manners and a healthy mind and body.
    Because of this, kendo is pursued with an aim to:

    1. Polish ones mind
    2. Strengthen ones body through training
    3. Learn technique

    Kendo is not a violent pursuit practiced with competition in mind. It is a means of teaching budo in order to develop healthy citizens, and it is important to never forget this.


    2. Kendo and etiquette

    Etiquette is important in order to live peacefully in society, and as expressed in the old saying "Start with rei and end with rei", it is of particular importance in kendo. No matter how good your kendo gets technically, if your character is lacking you will never be truely practicing kendo.
    Kendo has the characteristic of being one of the most rigorous of physical activities, so even a slight mistake in etiquette can make it rough or violent.
    In order to avoid this, in order to practice correct kendo we are given much advice regarding etiquette and manner.
    Not only in the dojo; at home or at school you should always keep an honest heart and try and develop a great character and spirit.

  • #2
    The test is "open book"

    The standard answers for the written tests, not just sho-dan, are succinctly described on the AUSKF website. Our sensei, though, want your own interpretation - not a cut-n-paste job, even as good an answer as yours.

    Everyone must learn their own way. There are no cheat sheets in kendo. If you think this way, you flunk even if the sensei don't catch on. It will show in your practice.
    Last edited by yoda-waza; 10th November 2006, 10:12 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by yoda-waza
      The standard answers for the written tests, not just sho-dan, are succinctly described on the AUSKF website. Our sensei, though, want your own interpretation - not a cut-n-paste job, even as good an answer as yours.

      Everyone must learn their own way. There are no cheat sheets in kendo. If you think this way, you flunk even if the sensei don't catch on. It will show in your practice.
      Thanks. I'll remember that when I go for my next grading.

      Comment


      • #4
        To clarify:

        The site I taken these from carries the following introduction which is in the spirit with which I am translating them here.

        この剣道学科解説は、大阪府剣道連盟によって編集されたものを
        私が学習するために書き写したものです

        剣道をされる方、されない方にかかわらず、何時でも何処でも
        学習して頂けるのではないかと思い掲載する事にしました

        個人的な学習以外の目的での使用はお止め下さい

        "These explanations of kendo written examinations were collated by the Osaka-fu Kendo Renmei and I have transcribed them for the use of study.

        I have posted them here so people can study whenever they like and wherever they like, regardless of whether they are kendo practioners or not.

        Please do not use them for other than private study."

        c.f. http://www.ne.jp/asahi/aaa/tagi2/gakka/gakkaindex.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by yoda-waza
          The standard answers for the written tests, not just sho-dan, are succinctly described on the AUSKF website
          Is this the one you mean?
          http://www.auskf.info/main/study.htm

          I agree that this is succinct. If I ever make it though all this stuff I will have posted something that is a fair complement to the above.

          Also, lighten up a little maybe? Just a suggestion.

          Comment


          • #6
            3. How to sit

            In kendo rei there is "ritsu-rei" (standing bow) and "za-rei" (sitting bow). In training and shiai ritsu-rei is most commonly performed. At the beginning and the end of training in za-re is performed.

            1. How to sit in "seiza"

            (1) The eyes look straight forward
            (2) Bring the left foot slightly back, and quietly put your left knee down, followed by your right
            (3) Have the big toe of both feet overlapping (<- I've actually been told not to do this!!)
            (4) Open your knees slightly (about 20cm) and sit quietly
            (5) Pull your chin back, straighten your back and hold your head straight
            (6) Relax your shoulders, close your mouth and breath from your "hara" (<- the pit of your stomach) while looking forward
            (7) Place both hands on your thighs, pointed (slightly) inwards with the five fingers together.

            2. How to stand up from "seiza"

            Raise your waist and bring the balls of your feet up, bring your right foot slightly forward (<- I've been told different stuff here too) and stand up quitely, bringing your left foot up to your right.

            3. How to do "za-rei"

            From the position of seiza gaze at your opponent and at the same time as tilting your upper body forward bring both your hands forward from your knees, straighten your fingers and place them in an apex whilelowering your head. Hold that position for a short while, and then slowly return to the position of seiza.
            Note: Be careful not to bend your neck or raise your waist (<- ass).

            4.竹刀の名称 (略) (parts of the shinai - abbreviated)
            Last edited by Nanbanjin; 10th November 2006, 12:42 PM.

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            • #7
              I thank you very much for these "cheat sheets" and am looking forward to reading others in the series (hopefully nidan) that you might be willing to translate. I found the previous set very helpful and a good start for reflection even thought I am sure I do not yet have the capability to fully understand them as yet. Maybe in a few years (decade) when I am ready for them.

              Thanks again,

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you Mark. By the time I get around to 2nd dan you might be going for 3rd dan.

                5. Chudan-no-kamae
                Chudan-no-kamae is a basic stance that is effective in both attack and defence

                (1) The basics

                From a position of standing straight bring your right foot forward a little. Your left and is below your navel about one fist away from your body, with your right hand gripping just slightly separated from the tsuba. The "tsuru" (<- the string) should be facing up, and the extension of the kensen should be at the hight of your opponent's throat.

                (2) Eyes

                Watch your opponent's eyes, and watch so that you can see your opponent's whole body.

                (3) Gripping the shinai

                The left hand should be gripping with the little finger right at the tsuka-gashira (<- back of the shinai). The right hand should be just a slight distance from the base of the tsuba. Grip with the small and ring fingers of both hands, and relax the middle and index fingers and the thumbs (the thumbs should be such that they are angled down). Grip softly such that the extension of the line of the tsuru passes through the gap between the thumb and forefinger of both hands.

                (4) Bending the elbows

                Bend your arms naturally without holding them straight, without bringing them in and without tensing them.

                (5) The position of both feet and how to move them

                The toes of both feet point forward with a gap between left and right of about 10cm. The feet should be such that the back of the right heel is in line with the front of the toes of the left foot. Body weight should be balanced over both feet, and the left heel should be slightly off the ground. The sole of the right foot touches the ground (<- many may have heard differently). Both knees should be held naturally such that your body can move freely in any direction.

                Comment


                • #9
                  its so awesome to hear a CORRECT way to do something, not just everyones different opinion. This is fantastic, please continue!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Nanbanjin again.


                    Damn it!!!!!!! ARRRGGGG, i have been giving other people positive reps. but i still can't give nanbanjin any rep points!!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Alison2805
                      its so awesome to hear a CORRECT way to do something, not just everyones different opinion. This is fantastic, please continue!
                      Be careful there. Treat everything with with some level of scepticism. A lot of the time there is no real "correct" answer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have no problem with "cheat sheets" being used as a form of education, I would just warn people that the cut and paste approach is a waste of your own time.

                        heres a little true story from the time of my shodan -
                        I was behind a gent who as part of his written exam handed in a beautiful illustration of a shinai, broken down into the various bits and pieces and labelled each bit.

                        His kendo was good and he passed.

                        I was fencing him after the grading and I asked him to stop because I saw that his nakayui had come loose.

                        HE apologised went into seiza and checked his armour. shook his head and stood up, and straight into chudan

                        Thinking he misheard I repeated the warning about his loose nakayui and this time pointed to it.
                        he said "oh.. the string holder bit.... is loose bad?"

                        ARGHHHH!!!!! terrifying.

                        I later found he copied the diagram and names form T'internet, without taking it in.


                        So I would ask that if you use cheat sheets.... Please try and understand what you read, dont just regurgitate it.

                        Cheers

                        Paulo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's a small test that should save us all from parrot learning:

                          If you read the title "Sho-dan written test cheat sheet" and can't decipher the humour, stop reading.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Nanbanjin
                            If you read the title "Sho-dan written test cheat sheet" and can't decipher the humour, stop reading.
                            Reading stopped

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Nanbanjin again.

                              I just found out that you don't give points before your 100th post. So how did I give you points?

                              Never mind.

                              Thanks for the posts here and on the godan exam. It's nice to have a formal description you can compare your semi-formed ideas against...

                              tnx
                              cesare

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