Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Promotion Ceremony?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Promotion Ceremony?

    It is quite apparent there is a lot of tradition and ceremony in the martial arts; is there a specific ceremony to award someone their newest promotion? I have read different things regarding Sake and Swords, but have not seen anything directly related to Kendo.

    A link to an article for the proper protocol would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Erhh, you get a certificate and told to work even harder in order to live up to the new rank...I think that's about it
    Various dojo's may have their own unique ways, but there's no 'official' ceremony as such.

    Jakob

    Comment


    • #3
      Certificate

      If you are lucky you will get your cerificate before you are due for the next grading. And sometimes not at all.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've never seen anything at a promotion that is considered to be special. The testees test, the judges judge, and at the end of the testing period, they announce the results by the number assigned to each testee. No special ceremonies, no drinking of sake (but there is usually a party afterwards). Bear in mind that there are oftentimes children who are testing, and aside from being inappropriate, it's also illegal to serve them sake in this country.

        I have to agree with the other responses. Take your promotion quietly, do not let it go to your head. The next step is even harder than the one you just completed, so look on your promotion as a stepping stone.

        Comment


        • #5
          Only thing I heard about sake and sword is kamikaze pilot. From the movie of course.

          Comment


          • #6
            Actually

            Actually what we usually do is, because of the long length of time to get menjos the club usually prints up a very unoffical but nice none the less certificute just to let the individuals know that they have acheived this rank. Gives them something to look at until the real one comes in. Actully most of them like these better than the ones the AUSKF issues. Go figure huh.... but they are not a replacement nor a in Dojo promotion, nor are they charged for. They are given simply for the student to see something until the offical one comes. We then usually give these out during the next class that we meet.

            Comment


            • #7
              In southern california, when kenshi get a dan rank, there is a dinner party at a Korean BBQ place.

              Comment


              • #8
                Our club is a young club, only about five years old so there are several firsts every year. My Kendo instructor, who is also an 8th Dan in Jujitsu, started this tradition/ceremony that when one of our students works from their recruitment to Shodan, they receive a set of swords to place on a wall. (Not totally the best swords in the world, but the symbol here is what is important I think.) The student is called up, the certificate is read aloud and then they are presented with the certificate and the set of swords. Also we have this presentation case that has an old samurai helmet in it, you also get your name engraved on this case. So I think that this is kind of cool that this is done, but now my Kendo instructor has been promoted, so I was wondering what, if anything we could do for him.

                I also think there is a bit of a difference expectation in the attaining the rank of Shodan in Kendo compared to other martial arts. In most other martial arts when you achieve the black belt status it implies a certain higher status where in Kendo it seems to mean that you are an advanced beginner of sorts and nobody really pays attention to you until at least a Sandan.

                At any rate, I was wondering what would be appropriate for my instructor.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Probably that only happen in a little fantasy world ..where you can become a samurai in 3 days...and after you become a samurai in 3days...you will get a bottle of sake and a ''really'' sharp-looking katana.......

                  -_-'''.............................

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Navyguy, when I was taking karate about 28 years ago, my sensei made the point that you don't start learning karate until you have attained shodan. I have carried that feeling with me into kendo as well. I'll always be "student", but I just might be a little more along the path up the mountain with each passing day.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Navyguy
                      Our club is a young club, only about five years old so there are several firsts every year. My Kendo instructor, who is also an 8th Dan in Jujitsu, started this tradition/ceremony that when one of our students works from their recruitment to Shodan, they receive a set of swords to place on a wall. (Not totally the best swords in the world, but the symbol here is what is important I think.) The student is called up, the certificate is read aloud and then they are presented with the certificate and the set of swords. Also we have this presentation case that has an old samurai helmet in it, you also get your name engraved on this case. So I think that this is kind of cool that this is done, but now my Kendo instructor has been promoted, so I was wondering what, if anything we could do for him.

                      I also think there is a bit of a difference expectation in the attaining the rank of Shodan in Kendo compared to other martial arts. In most other martial arts when you achieve the black belt status it implies a certain higher status where in Kendo it seems to mean that you are an advanced beginner of sorts and nobody really pays attention to you until at least a Sandan.

                      At any rate, I was wondering what would be appropriate for my instructor.
                      Navyguy-san, how are you doing? That is a really tough question because your instructor may have many things related to martial arts. Does anyone know the instructor on a more personal level that may be able to give you some ideas of what he has or wants? If it were me, I would stay away from the usual things and come up with something original. Maybe making something for him like his own personal tenagui, named engraved bokken set, special tsuba engraved with his promotion info, or take a photo of the promotion and buy a nice engraved frame. I think these types of things would be more meaningful and there is a good chance he does not have many of these. See what you think. Which rank is he testing for?

                      I have done many martial arts before kendo as well and found that the idea of "black belt" is over inflated. I saw promotions where you are called sensei when you get your first black belt. Well... just as in Kendo a shodan is a beginner. Kendo has kept many of the roots linked to Japanese culture. In Japan, (cannot speak for anywhere else) even in judo, karate, aikido and so on... shodan is just an advanced beginner. In the US, we have taken arts that have been here for a long time like karate, judo and jujitsu and put our own twist on it, so a black belt carries more weight because it is black. It is just a concept that has sprouted in the West that black belts are lethal. Silly idea, I think. Actually, a shodan in any martial art should be considered an advanced beginner. And even during the time I was 3-dan in kendo, everyone still ignored me. Ah well... Best of luck to you.

                      Alex

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        To both Joe and Alex, I could not agree with both of you more in your comments. I was my instructors first Shodan in Kendo, so although I feel that I am no different then anybody else in the club I still was his first Shodan (advanced beginner) and he, if not I, puts some special attachment to that, and I respect him for that.

                        My instructors kendo story is a bit unique I think. He has been doing Kendo for over 35 years. Along with his Jujitsu (8th Dan), he has trained and taught all over the world, including working with many police forces and military trainers. He has also written several private distributed reference manuals/books on unarmed combat for police and military training. Yet he has never graded for Kendo in all these years. His last grading was about 25 years ago when he was graded to Shodan. He was just recently promoted to Nidan, but there was some question if he could grade because they could not find his Shodan certificate from that far back. He is not into the ranking thing too much so he says, and never graded, but I think there was some pressure to grade in todays day and age. Cant exactly have a Shodan running a club I guess. Politics, I hate them.

                        At any rate I know that there are lots of mementos/gifts to give him, that is not the question. I was just wondering if there was a special ceremony that we could celebrate his newest level with the rest of our club members, with some sort of traditional reference.

                        With your comments regarding the Black Belt thing, I totally agree, and I think my instructor does also, so maybe nothing is better. On the other hand, there is no way in the world I would want to disrespect him by not at least trying to do something special. After all he did wait 25 years! ;-)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Navyguy
                          ...At any rate I know that there are lots of mementos/gifts to give him, that is not the question. I was just wondering if there was a special ceremony that we could celebrate his newest level with the rest of our club members, with some sort of traditional reference...
                          Navyguy-san, sorry, I think that I misunderstood you with the gift thing. I hope I did not offend.

                          As far as a special ceremony, I really have no idea. A sensei reading the certificate to the person promoted in front of the entire dojo is about all I have ever seen. Maybe comments to the group by the person about difficulties in reaching that level. Sorry, I wish I had more ideas.

                          Please let us know what you decide and how it goes.

                          Alex

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Navyguy
                            It is quite apparent there is a lot of tradition and ceremony in the martial arts; is there a specific ceremony to award someone their newest promotion? I have read different things regarding Sake and Swords, but have not seen anything directly related to Kendo.

                            A link to an article for the proper protocol would be appreciated.
                            Nothing specific - case by case. In fact, Sensei may not do it the same way twice.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Our tradition: at the very next practice after you pass your test, you have to do jigeiko until sensei says stop, or some similar feat of endurance.

                              Nice traditions, Navyguy. Why not suggest that to commemorate your teacher's new rank you line him up at one end of the dojo and have him take on all comers?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X