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  • What you need to know for.....

    I've been doing Kendo for a few months, and will probably be taking my first exam for 1kyu sometime in November.

    Anyways, I've looked but couldn't seem to find any real defintion, or guidline as to what a certain grade level kendoka should know. Things like, a 1kyu should know _____waza, and ___kata, and other misc. stuff.

    So for starters, what waza and kata should a kendoka know and understand, and be able to preform reasonalbly well to be considered, or pass an 1kyu examination? What do you need to know to go to sho-dan?

  • #2
    I think for ikkyu, you have to know the first 3 kata. Other than that, I really don't know much else. I want to take my ikkyu exam later this year as well.

    You may want to check the AJKF website to see if they have it there.

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    • #3
      Going for ikkyu after only a few months????
      I'm going for mine in October, after 15 months training.

      Katas 1-3 are required, and obviously all kihon, footwork, good kiri kaeshi.

      Can anyone else exapnd on this?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Benegizer
        I've been doing Kendo for a few months, and will probably be taking my first exam for 1kyu sometime in November.

        Anyways, I've looked but couldn't seem to find any real defintion, or guidline as to what a certain grade level kendoka should know. Things like, a 1kyu should know _____waza, and ___kata, and other misc. stuff.

        So for starters, what waza and kata should a kendoka know and understand, and be able to preform reasonalbly well to be considered, or pass an 1kyu examination? What do you need to know to go to sho-dan?
        Requirements for grading in Japan are determined at prefecture level, so ask your teacher, as it may vary. For ikkyu (in Japan), you probably just need to turn up.

        Jakob

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        • #5
          testing

          "So for starters, what waza and kata should a kendoka know and understand?"

          The most important thing is to show up on time.
          Also make sure that you are dressed correctly, don't stand there sloppy with your chest exposed for example
          just do what ever you have learned in practice, strong kiai and a straight back should help alot to. Whatever you do don't drop your shinai...
          do your kendo, don't go and be like the other candidates, do things like you have learned...

          good luck!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JSchmidt
            For ikkyu (in Japan), you probably just need to turn up.

            Jakob
            Hmmm... Me thinks JSchmidt-san has no high opinion of Japanese junior high school kendo!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Pauly
              Hmmm... Me thinks JSchmidt-san has no high opinion of Japanese junior high school kendo!
              Oh, I got a reasonable high opinion of Japanese high school kendo.
              It's just that the way Japanese seem to approach western adults when it comes to kendo.
              I don't, however, have a very high opinion on the way the Japanese seem to approach western adults & the first couple of grades

              Jakob

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pauly
                Hmmm... Me thinks JSchmidt-san has no high opinion of Japanese junior high school kendo!
                Try looking at some pass rate stats for 1st kyu to 2nd dan for schoolkids in Japan and you'll find youself in agreement with JSchmidt. I don't know about Toyama, but in Tokyo it's somewhere in the 90s... not everyone can be that good!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kingofmyrrh
                  Try looking at some pass rate stats for 1st kyu to 2nd dan for schoolkids in Japan and you'll find youself in agreement with JSchmidt. I don't know about Toyama, but in Tokyo it's somewhere in the 90s... not everyone can be that good!
                  90's?!?! That's a tad too high. I would also like to see the age statistics on the foreigners as well.

                  Truth is, I know what you guys are talking about. I just haven't come up with a convincing reason for it yet. I'm working on it and when I publish my ground-breaking 'Westerners and the AJKF Grading Anomaly' I'll post the link on KWF (citing works of Dr. Bennett where required).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I must say I'm confused, having never graded in Japan. Are you saying that they're more lenient on foreigners? Or more strict? There's a chance I'll end up doing my 4th dan there so I should probably find out!

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                    • #11
                      passing thru on the attack..

                      Really make an effort in pass thru all the way during your attack.

                      also dont interrupt your attack if you become baffled by your opponents reaction, complete it.

                      Just succesfully passed my I kiu, and those where the hinters I just received...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kingofmyrrh
                        I must say I'm confused, having never graded in Japan. Are you saying that they're more lenient on foreigners? Or more strict? There's a chance I'll end up doing my 4th dan there so I should probably find out!
                        There is a bit of a consensus that foreigners who grade in JApan are treated more leniently than they probably should. Although I have only heard this for lower grades, certainly not yondan.

                        There is another possibility. For people who are really into kendo and have lots of potential and such, I have heard comments that Japanese gradings are fairly easy until about sandan. Then the criteria seems to get stricter all of a sudden. This is just hearsay, but it is possible that they have lower standards for the lower grades, but at a yondan level, I would expect standards to be pretty strict since that is getting up there a bit. It may just be that the standards they are looking for are not gradually increasing. It's easy, sort of easy, and then all of a sudden they really challenge you... or so I have heard.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I just watched the promotion exams this weekend at the AUSKF Summer Camp. Granted, they were for shodan and up to nanadan, but I think a little insight into what the panel was looking for then would also apply to your ikkyu exam.

                          For the ECUSKF, it's 2 jigeiko with equal or higher level than the grade for which you are testing. The panel wants to see aggressive spirit, zanshin, and proper footwork. The idea isn't to score a point, or to win a match, it's to demonstrate your skills and ability and spirit.

                          First 3 kata, either as uchidachi or shidachi.

                          I have seen one member test for ikkyu after 13 months. He was outstanding in his performance in both jigeiko and in the kata as uchidachi. He's now in Japan studying 4-5 times a week and when he gets back, he's probably going to kick our collective butts in the dojo.

                          I am going for my first promotion test in September. I don't know which level, yet, since we are allowed to test and then allow the panel to determine the level they believe we are most entitled to be awarded.

                          Good luck in your exam, Nothing, and relax when you get out onto the floor. Pretend it's just another class, and by the time you start on the kata, and allow your focus to remain on your opponent, you won't have time to worry about the panel. Experience has taught me this, not necessarily kendo experience (which I have only 16 months), but life experience (which I have 53 years). Even so, I'm a bit apprehensive about testing, myself.

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                          • #14
                            In answer to the Japan gradings, despite what you have heard, go and fight a Japanese high school 2-dan or 3-dan. Then you'll know if you are worthy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kingofmyrrh
                              I must say I'm confused, having never graded in Japan. Are you saying that they're more lenient on foreigners? Or more strict? There's a chance I'll end up doing my 4th dan there so I should probably find out!
                              Yondan is a little different, as it's the first 'adult' grade in Japan, (Sandan being somewhat inbetween), but ikkyu and shodan are kids grades in Japan.

                              Jakob

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