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  • Kendo-judo connection?

    Hello;
    I was reading a post or an article on line some where and didn't save it ,but i was wondering what's the repect thing between most if not all Kendo sensei and Judo sensei and what part if any did Kano shihan play in forming Kendo kata for school systems and his part in helping Kendo get into the schools as a health benafit to students just as he did with Judo ,then and now.
    Sincerely;
    herb

  • #2
    I have no idea if Kano was involved in any way for the creation of kendo (that would be very surprising though, never heard he was versed in any sword art, at least not enough to do this). As for the connection, well they both have the same system and were implemented in schools because they reflected the desire of unification and homogenisation of the Meiji government (as opposed to the koryu way, emphasizing differences between schools). They basically grew together and don't really compete for attention as they adress different means of fighting.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by herb mowery View Post
      what part if any did Kano shihan play in forming Kendo kata for school systems
      None whatsoever, look for names like Ozawa Unosuke.

      and his part in helping Kendo get into the schools as a health benafit to students just as he did with Judo ,then and now.
      Once again, very little AFAIK. It was mainly down to the efforts of some determined diet members, but I have no way of checking their names right now. But I must confess I've kind of forgotten a lot of what I used to know about this so I welcome correction.

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      • #4
        You can find out some of that history in this very informative e-budo post by Will Bodiford.

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        • #5
          From our dojo history:

          "The Obukan Kendo Club is an outgrowth of the Obukan Judo Dojo which began with demonstration of Kito-ryu Jujutsu given by Bunzaemon Nii and an unknown opponent at the Lewis & Clark Exhibition of 1905. When the Portland Judo CLub was formed in 1926, Nii sensei was chosen as the first instructor.

          Following the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, Dr. Jigoro Kano, judo's founder, visited Oregon while touring the United States and insisted that the Portland club call itself "Obukan." The "O" refers to Oregon; Oregon was called "O-shu" or O-state by Japanese immigrants. The "Bu" means martial training. And the "Kan" means building or training hall. A separate kendo club was formed in Gresham during this period of time. The "G T Dojo" for Gresham-Troutdale, was organized by Sueo (Buddy) Ikata with Odate sensei, a 2 dan from Japan, as head instructor.

          In 1936 the Portland Kendo and Judo Club began practicing in the Foster Hotel on NW 3rd under Jiro Sakano (kendo) and Mochizuki sensei (judo). Years later, Sakano Sensei was still active in kendo at 80+ years of age in the San Mateo Dojo in California.

          A third club operated in the Mayport area. Among the early competitors was James Onchi, present Chief Instructor of Obukan Judo in North Portland.

          Kendo practice was halted with the internment of Japanese-Americans during the Second World War. Following the war, Obukan Judo was restarted in 1954.

          In the early spring of 1980, Obukan Judo Sensei Al Mar and Chief Instructor Jim Onchi contacted Stephen Strauch with the purpose of re-establishing the Obukan Kendo Club in Portland at the Obukan Judo Club's Lombard Street Dojo. Strauch Sensei, a kendoka from Hawaii and a student of Shuji Mikami and his son Yoshiharu at the traditional "Shiseikan Dojo" in Kapahulu, agreed and began teaching with the aid of several of his students from Portland Kendo, a club he and Tomotsu Osada Sensei had formed in 1975."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
            You can find out some of that history in this very informative e-budo post by Will Bodiford.
            Great post by W.Bodiford, thank you for sharing.

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            • #7
              ..

              .... sad very much ( it,s test )

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