Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Differences between Korean, Chinese, and Japanese Martial Arts

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Differences between Korean, Chinese, and Japanese Martial Arts

    I was wondering what the major differences between these 3 types of martials arts are. In my limited experience I've always thought Japanese fighting was more rigid like the karate stances, Korean always circular like in Hapkido, and Chinese more fluid, more like Korean but not as circular and more dependent on stance. Iaido is very fluid but when I see Katana demonstrations the cutting is always so solid and the cut stops right after the target is hit, wheres with like a Jian they cut but the sword ends up at the top after the hit. In fact I never see flips in Japanese martial arts movies, I probably haven't watched that many but a Kung Fu movie isn't even in the martials arts category if it doesn't have a flip or two.

  • #2
    Originally posted by KO1598 View Post
    I was wondering what the major differences between these 3 types of martials arts are. In my limited experience I've always thought Japanese fighting was more rigid like the karate stances, Korean always circular like in Hapkido, and Chinese more fluid, more like Korean but not as circular and more dependent on stance. Iaido is very fluid but when I see Katana demonstrations the cutting is always so solid and the cut stops right after the target is hit, wheres with like a Jian they cut but the sword ends up at the top after the hit. In fact I never see flips in Japanese martial arts movies, I probably haven't watched that many but a Kung Fu movie isn't even in the martials arts category if it doesn't have a flip or two.
    Don't beleive everything you see in the movies. Kung Fu for example can be fluid or more solid much like Karate. Although you have to remember Karate is not the only hand to hand martial art, for example ju jitsu is much "softer" then karate. I think the difference with Jian vs Katana is that the katana has the ability to cut through bone and so requires more then just what you see with the Jian as it is more slashing/piercing then out right cutting.

    Again this is only my opinion and I have no experience with chinese/korean martial arts aside from what I've seen in demonstrations.

    Comment


    • #3
      As far as i know Karate has mixed roots historicaly (japanese/okinawan and chinese) , Hapkido two, as to fluidity it pretty much depends on the skill level of the person you're watching.
      About the sword arts, the Jian is obviously different from the katana, which means the way it can be used is different as Fallen pointed out.

      Comment


      • #4
        You'll find a surprising amount of cross-pollination within the martial arts and generalizing is, well, generally wrong.
        For example, we know that some ryu of jujutsu had/have heavy emphasis on atemi and would appear closer to modern karate than judo, while other ryu would place more emphasis on locks and chokes, others on throws, etc.
        A similar variety is to be found in the Chinese systems. Popular depictions as being light and fluid are possibly due to the wushu movement.
        Even approaches to karate are in no way polarized.
        The differences are worth examining, but I would consider the similarities more important. Just my two bits worth.

        Comment

        Working...
        X