Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Information about the late Sakano sensei

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Information about the late Sakano sensei

    Does anyone have any biographical information about the late Jiro Sakano sensei? I believe he was instrumental in starting several dojo in the California Bay Area.

    I did a Google search and came up with this, which I suppose belongs to a different thread in the 'Flames' section.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    I got to practice some with Sakano Sensei when I first started Kendo back in the seventies. I was at San Jose State Dojo with Hazard Sensei but traveled around to several of the nearby dojos. Sakano Sensei was the chief instructor at Mountain View dojo, along with Tadashi Kurasawa Sensei. Both were 7 dan. He was a true gentleman and taught me things I still talk about to my students. I participated in a tournament at Mountain View to commemorate his 80th birthday (I took third place among yudansha and won the Kanto Sho trophy). I was surprised to learn he was that old. I thought he was at least 15 years younger. The last time I practiced with him before I moved to Portland, Oregon, he decided to play around and took jodan against me (I was about a foot taller). He could not reach my men (80 year old legs) but he nailed my kote with some regularity. When I got to Portland, I discovered he had been either one of the sensei or THE sensei at the original Obukan Dojo in the 1930's. I believe you can find out some information about him on the Obukan Kendo dojo website in the history section. Somewhere I was told (I am not sure where) that he originally came from the Salt Lake City area. He served as the team coach for the Northern California Federation team at the first United States National Championship in Los Angeles in 1978. I think (but not sure) he served as the "group leader" for the American contingent at one of the World Championships. He may have been Shimpan Cho for one of the early U.S. National Championships but I am not sure of that. He was one of the founders of the San Mateo Dojo. The last time I saw him was at the Third US nationals at Seattle in 1984. He remembered my face but not my name. I think he was 82 and he lived to be 92. I do not know if he continued to practice until 92. I do remember one time when I ran over after a practice and was tying up his bogu, he was carrying on a conversation in Japanese with another sensei. I could not understand it but every once in a while I heard the word "Forty-Niners." I think this was during the years Bill Walsh built the 49ers from the worst team in pro football to the dominating team of the eighties.
    This is the story about him that I tell all my beginner students in Charlotte. I was sitting in the locker room after a practice at Mountain View and Sakano Sensei sat down beside me. He said "No one will teach you the good Kendo. You must steal the good kendo. Watch the good people and imitate what they do, until their kendo becomes your kendo."

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by kstrawn View Post
      I got to practice some with Sakano Sensei when I first started Kendo back in the seventies. I was at San Jose State Dojo with Hazard Sensei but traveled around to several of the nearby dojos. Sakano Sensei was the chief instructor at Mountain View dojo, along with Tadashi Kurasawa Sensei. Both were 7 dan. He was a true gentleman and taught me things I still talk about to my students. I participated in a tournament at Mountain View to commemorate his 80th birthday (I took third place among yudansha and won the Kanto Sho trophy). I was surprised to learn he was that old. I thought he was at least 15 years younger. The last time I practiced with him before I moved to Portland, Oregon, he decided to play around and took jodan against me (I was about a foot taller). He could not reach my men (80 year old legs) but he nailed my kote with some regularity. When I got to Portland, I discovered he had been either one of the sensei or THE sensei at the original Obukan Dojo in the 1930's. I believe you can find out some information about him on the Obukan Kendo dojo website in the history section. Somewhere I was told (I am not sure where) that he originally came from the Salt Lake City area. He served as the team coach for the Northern California Federation team at the first United States National Championship in Los Angeles in 1978. I think (but not sure) he served as the "group leader" for the American contingent at one of the World Championships. He may have been Shimpan Cho for one of the early U.S. National Championships but I am not sure of that. He was one of the founders of the San Mateo Dojo. The last time I saw him was at the Third US nationals at Seattle in 1984. He remembered my face but not my name. I think he was 82 and he lived to be 92. I do not know if he continued to practice until 92. I do remember one time when I ran over after a practice and was tying up his bogu, he was carrying on a conversation in Japanese with another sensei. I could not understand it but every once in a while I heard the word "Forty-Niners." I think this was during the years Bill Walsh built the 49ers from the worst team in pro football to the dominating team of the eighties.
      This is the story about him that I tell all my beginner students in Charlotte. I was sitting in the locker room after a practice at Mountain View and Sakano Sensei sat down beside me. He said "No one will teach you the good Kendo. You must steal the good kendo. Watch the good people and imitate what they do, until their kendo becomes your kendo."
      This was really cool. Thanks for sharing all that. Especially the last part.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kstrawn View Post
        I got to practice some with Sakano Sensei when I first started Kendo back in the seventies. I was at San Jose State Dojo with Hazard Sensei but traveled around to several of the nearby dojos. Sakano Sensei was the chief instructor at Mountain View dojo, along with Tadashi Kurasawa Sensei. Both were 7 dan. He was a true gentleman and taught me things I still talk about to my students. I participated in a tournament at Mountain View to commemorate his 80th birthday (I took third place among yudansha and won the Kanto Sho trophy). I was surprised to learn he was that old. I thought he was at least 15 years younger. The last time I practiced with him before I moved to Portland, Oregon, he decided to play around and took jodan against me (I was about a foot taller). He could not reach my men (80 year old legs) but he nailed my kote with some regularity. When I got to Portland, I discovered he had been either one of the sensei or THE sensei at the original Obukan Dojo in the 1930's. I believe you can find out some information about him on the Obukan Kendo dojo website in the history section. Somewhere I was told (I am not sure where) that he originally came from the Salt Lake City area. He served as the team coach for the Northern California Federation team at the first United States National Championship in Los Angeles in 1978. I think (but not sure) he served as the "group leader" for the American contingent at one of the World Championships. He may have been Shimpan Cho for one of the early U.S. National Championships but I am not sure of that. He was one of the founders of the San Mateo Dojo. The last time I saw him was at the Third US nationals at Seattle in 1984. He remembered my face but not my name. I think he was 82 and he lived to be 92. I do not know if he continued to practice until 92. I do remember one time when I ran over after a practice and was tying up his bogu, he was carrying on a conversation in Japanese with another sensei. I could not understand it but every once in a while I heard the word "Forty-Niners." I think this was during the years Bill Walsh built the 49ers from the worst team in pro football to the dominating team of the eighties.
        This is the story about him that I tell all my beginner students in Charlotte. I was sitting in the locker room after a practice at Mountain View and Sakano Sensei sat down beside me. He said "No one will teach you the good Kendo. You must steal the good kendo. Watch the good people and imitate what they do, until their kendo becomes your kendo."
        Wow, that's gotta be the best first post ever by anyone here in the Kendo World Forum...positive reputation!

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome to Kendo World, Strawn-sensei.

          Comment


          • #6
            I 'think' Strawn sensei has been lurking around the board for quite some time but it is good to see him post. I've always found him to be a fountain of knowledge and he has many interesting stories.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you, Strawn Sensei. OK if I send you a Private Message on the forum?

              Comment

              Working...
              X