Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need some help with Kanjis

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need some help with Kanjis

    Dear fellow Kendoka,


    I've got a sequence of kanjis here I'd need a translation for. I was told what they mean, but I'd like to have it verified by some other people. I attached a picture, but its very small (disk quota). Hope someone can help me ...


    Thank you very much!
    -VS-
    Attached Files

  • #2
    tsune ni kaizen

    constantly improving
    always ameliorating (couldn`t resist the stupid alliteration)
    always reforming etc etc the first one makes most sense in a kendo context

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi,

      this matches with my translation here


      Thanks for your help!
      -VS-

      Comment


      • #4
        thats very nice ...
        did you write it ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi there


          No I didn't write it myself. It was created by a professional calligraphist who I told the words "always" and "improve" to form a sequence of kanjis. He then designed several sequences with slightly different meanings for me. Normally you could say since it was done by a professional you can be sure about the meaning, but since this shall be a tattoo pattern I wanted to be 200% sure ...
          So I finally chose this one, because it matched the desired purpose best and I also liked the look

          The meaning to always improve (not only) yourself [mind and body], but also your work [education, job, etc.], and the world around you [help others] is my basic attitude to life (hope this doesn't sound stupid) and due to this I will have these kanjis tattooed on my left scapula in the next weeks.


          Best
          -VS-
          Last edited by VirtualSamurai; 13th July 2004, 05:41 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            That's far too literal a phrase to use as a tatoo. Would you get a tatoo saying "Always improving" in English?

            Have a look a the following thread

            http://www.kendo-world.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2041

            Something that sort of means the same thing as "Always improving" is 百錬自得 Not something I would get printed on my arm, but at least a little more poetic than 常に改善

            The Japanese I have asked about this are in favour of subtle use of kanji. To know what's subtle you need to have a good grasp of the meaning of the characters. A better grasp than I have at least. Ask around a little more.

            Comment


            • #7
              Double checked with a Japanese girl at training tonight. She predictably said that having hirigana mixed with the kanji is not good. The general balance of 常に改善 is also not good.

              Comment


              • #8
                VS,

                I would listen to Nanbanjin and the "Japanese girl" if i were you. Kanji mixed with hirigana is bad. It would be better to do some more research before permanently marking your body with a foreign language.

                There are too many people running around with bad kanji tatoos these days. Perhaps it is cultural payback for all those Japanese t-shirts with nonsensical English slogans, like "ultimate orientation powering optimum protection" or "best cheese for excellent needs."

                At least you're not getting the characters for Kendo tatooed on each butt cheek. But you're still representin', so keep it real!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why do you need a tattoo in Japanese??? Are you Japanese, or do you just wish that you were?

                  How may Japanese, do you expect run around with abstract sentances tattooed on thier bodies? how many have it in a foreign script (i.e. English) because 'the characters are just more aesthetic'.

                  If you can't read it, and don't understand it, all your tattoo will be is a meaningless collection of lines. If you are to tattoo yourself, then do with something relevant to who you are.

                  You'll want a mon on your dou next, and kanji on your zekken...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by D'Artagnan
                    Why do you need a tattoo in Japanese??? Are you Japanese, or do you just wish that you were?
                    But think how cool he will look with that tatoo, especially when all his friends and everyone else who sees it has to ask what it means and he is stuck trying to recollect the true english definition....now if that isnt being a bad@$$ rebel i dont know what is....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good evening everybody

                      Nanbanjin, thank you very much for you information! As I already wrote I wanted to gather some more information before, so I really appreciate your actions I'll recheck this some more I guess ...

                      To answer one of your questions: "Would you get a tatoo saying "Always improving" in English?" No I wouldn't because it looks crappy I don't want anything poetic, in fact I like it that this CAN be interpreted in different ways (like my other tattoo). A tattoo is something permanent, so if the meaning can be seen in different ways it fits even better, because I hope to ... well guess ... improve/change It's really hard to describe what I mean, it would take several hours I guess

                      not-I, I would also like to thank you for your kind 'warnings'. I already have a tattoo on my right shoulder so I somehow can judge the weight of such a decision and I have been thinking about the second one for over 2 month now and will rething it for years if necessary until I'm absolute sure. I really liked your butt-cheek idea, maybe I'll safe that for a third tattoo

                      D'Artagnan, I'd also like to thank you for yourvery friendly reply. I'm not Japanese as you might have seen by that tiny little flag-thingy in the upper right corner. I also don't really wish to be Japanese although I like various Japanese 'things' (didn't find a better word, sorry. would take some more hours again to explain everything) ...

                      "How may Japanese, do you expect run around with abstract sentances tattooed on thier bodies?"

                      I don't know ... 12 ?!

                      "If you are to tattoo yourself, then do with something relevant to who you are."

                      Believe it or not, but I am. And since you don't know me at all, this tattoo might wouldn't mean nothing to you

                      "You'll want a mon on your dou next, and kanji on your zekken..."

                      No I don't. My zekken has my name printed on it and that's OK. Actually this tattoo has nothing to do with my Kendo at all. I just asked for help in the forum, because I thought there might be people around here, whose Japanese is better than mine. And I finally had something to post, I'm more the quiet reader in the background So again, thank you very very much for your productive reply.

                      Cheese_Man, thanks for replying, too! If you think I'm doing this to be 'cool' then you're so far away from the truth that you couldn't be any further away. I don't have to impress anybody with something 'cool', I left this stage some years ago. And everybody who is gonna ask about the meaning will be told what it could mean and then may judge for himself, if this fits his personal view of myself or not. I wouldn't describe myself as a rebel, but I like to do things my way and this way is often different to the 'normal' way and ... I'm perfectly fine with it!



                      Funny, I didn't expect that kind of reply
                      Have a nice evening ...


                      Best
                      -VS-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have a terrible feeling of deja vu here.

                        To answer one of your questions: "Would you get a tatoo saying "Always improving" in English?" No I wouldn't because it looks crappy I don't want anything poetic, in fact I like it that this CAN be interpreted in different ways (like my other tattoo). A tattoo is something permanent, so if the meaning can be seen in different ways it fits even better, because I hope to ... well guess ... improve/change It's really hard to describe what I mean, it would take several hours I guess
                        My point here is that the phrase you have chosen is TOO direct. It can't be interpreted in enough ways. The sentence means "always improving" and that's about it. By something poetic I mean something that CAN be seen in different ways, which I think is what you want.

                        My personal aversion to tattoos is closely related to my aversion to pain, and my bad habit of making irreversible mistakes. If I got a tattoo it would surely hurt and I would surely regret it. I have no problem with other people getting tattoos.

                        As for kanji tattoos, I know 1 Japanese girl who has the character 辣 tattooed on her breast. Forgive me while I take a moment to catch my breath...

                        I have noticed that some Japanese tattooists offer a "per kanji" price listing, so I assume that other Japanese people have kanji tattooed on their bodies too, unless the service is provided exclusively for westerners like yourself.

                        I've noticed a few islander kids around Brisbane with what I assume is gang names written on their shoulders in nice Roman alphabet calligraphy. I guess they see it as art. Plenty of people have 'love' and 'hate' tattoed on their knuckles. 'Mum' is an old favourite.
                        Japanese and Chinese calligraphy is art too, and I don't see any difference with wanting to adorn your body with it as opposed to other forms of artistic expression.

                        And if you can't have Japanese calligraphy tattoos, does it mean also that people who adorn their walls with calligraphy are making some kind of social gaff also? I have the character 連 on my wall. This means nothing to me but it must have meant something to my instructor when he wrote it down and sent it to me.

                        Artistic expression will always attract critics, and some art IS good and some art IS crap. My advice would be to ask around to get a feel for the difference. Oh, and never, ever get a tattoo done when you're drunk!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by D'Artagnan
                          Why do you need a tattoo in Japanese??? Are you Japanese, or do you just wish that you were?
                          How may Japanese, do you expect run around with abstract sentances tattooed on thier bodies? how many have it in a foreign script (i.e. English) because 'the characters are just more aesthetic'.

                          If you can't read it, and don't understand it, all your tattoo will be is a meaningless collection of lines.
                          It's a BIG mistake to say that Japanese people don't do the EXACT same thing, although more with clothing than tatoos. A (japanese) friend of mine is in Japan for the summer and I was talking to him about the oh-so-creative usages of English found in Japan/on Japanese people. Ridiculous and/or senseless English phrases are popular in Japan... for some good examples check out www.engrish.com .
                          I'm not taking sides here (personally I wouldn't get a tattoo that I don't understand, but then again I wouldn't get a tattoo if I did understand it...) but you can't claim that Americans/Westerners are the only people who do weird and somewhat stupid things. When it comes to bizarre, the Japanese are right up there at the peak of Mount Weird.

                          Originally posted by Engrish.com
                          Q. Why do the Japanese try to use so much English if they can’t do it right?

                          A. Most of the Engrish found on Engrish.com is not an attempt to communicate - English is used as a design element in Japanese products and advertising to give them a modern look and feel (or just to "look cool"). There is often no attempt to try to get it right, nor do the vast majority of the Japanese population (= consumers) ever attempt to read the English design element in question (the girl wearing the
                          “Spread Beaver” shirt for example, had no idea what it said until a foreigner pointed it out to her). There is therefore less emphasis on spell checking and grammatical accuracy (note: the same can be said for the addition of Japanese or Chinese characters to hats, shirts and tattoos found in the US or Europe).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Where can I get a T-shirt that says 'spread beaver'?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi,


                              nice Website, Snobody


                              "My point here is that the phrase you have chosen is TOO direct. It can't be interpreted in enough ways. The sentence means "always improving" and that's about it."

                              Sorry Nanbanjin, I think I didn't get you right there (tried to PM you yesterday), but now I know what you mean Thnx

                              "By something poetic I mean something that CAN be seen in different ways, which I think is what you want."

                              This is correct, but I think the sentence leaves some space for interpretation

                              "My personal aversion to tattoos is closely related to my aversion to pain, and my bad habit of making irreversible mistakes. If I got a tattoo it would surely hurt and I would surely regret it."

                              It hurts, yes. And to not regret it one must be damn sure about it and that's why I'm thinking and asking about it I got my first one at the age of 19 and thought about it for over a year. Until today (and I think for the rest of my life) I didn't and won't regret it

                              "Artistic expression will always attract critics, and some art IS good and some art IS crap."

                              100% agree.

                              "My advice would be to ask around to get a feel for the difference. Oh, and never, ever get a tattoo done when you're drunk!"

                              As I mentioned earlier, I already got one and know the deal But thanks again for your kind advise.



                              Best
                              -VS-

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X