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  • Making a shoto from a 39 shinai

    I'm planning to attend the Musashi kai seminar in June, so I'm going to make my own shoto from a broken 39.
    After cutting off the tsuka and monouchi part of the shinai, it looks like the tip of the shorten shinai will be too big to fit a regular sakigawa on it. Should I just stretch the sakigawa and fit it on, or should I sandpaper it smaller?

  • #2
    Originally posted by ipkalium View Post
    I'm planning to attend the Musashi kai seminar in June, so I'm going to make my own shoto from a broken 39.
    After cutting off the tsuka and monouchi part of the shinai, it looks like the tip of the shorten shinai will be too big to fit a regular sakigawa on it. Should I just stretch the sakigawa and fit it on, or should I sandpaper it smaller?
    If you're already spending a couple hundred bucks to attend the seminar, then you should just invest the additional 30 or 40 bucks to get a regulation shoto. It's really hard to break a shoto, so it'll last you a really long time.

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    • #3
      ipkailium, if you have saved enough broken 39" shinai you can use the following procedure:
      http://user.xmission.com/~miik/nito/kodachi/

      Obviously with a self made shoto is not simply to respect the regulation (expecially weight, which must be inside the 280 gr and 300 gr interval) and you will need some work to fit that.

      So if you don't have time it's better to follow Moocow advice.

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      • #4
        They charge way too much for shoto. You're getting half the shinai, so you should be paying half the price.

        When I made mine, I just used take that were relatively thin and I squeezed the sakigawa on. It took me less than an hour total, and was built using pieces that would have been thrown out anyway. I'm not super worried about regulation because I will never be doing nito at a tournament, but if you're planning on doing that then maybe you should shell out the cash.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Raffa View Post
          Obviously with a self made shoto is not simply to respect the regulation (expecially weight, which must be inside the 280 gr and 300 gr interval) and you will need some work to fit that.
          There was one guy on Youtube who made two kodachi, one from a 39 and one from a 37. The former came up at 300 grammars, the latter at 280 gr. So if you're an adult male, either would suffice. Just make sure to weigh it a bit too.

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          • #6
            Thanks for everyone's reply

            Originally posted by Missingno. View Post
            They charge way too much for shoto. You're getting half the shinai, so you should be paying half the price.

            When I made mine, I just used take that were relatively thin and I squeezed the sakigawa on. It took me less than an hour total, and was built using pieces that would have been thrown out anyway. I'm not super worried about regulation because I will never be doing nito at a tournament, but if you're planning on doing that then maybe you should shell out the cash.
            I'll give it a try. Thanks
            Originally posted by Anorymous View Post
            There was one guy on Youtube who made two kodachi, one from a 39 and one from a 37. The former came up at 300 grammars, the latter at 280 gr. So if you're an adult male, either would suffice. Just make sure to weigh it a bit too.
            I do recall watching that. It looks like he have unlisted/removed most of his video.

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            • #7
              The two "how to" links posted above as well as a handy-dandy diagram to help you build your own nito shinai are near the bottom of this page http://www.idaho-kendo.com/nito/ Also, there will be shinai available for purchase from vendors at the camp this June 29 - July 1 in Oregon.

              Shinai are easy to find or make for nito, the issue is trying to find the correct bokutoh for nito kata practice. One good source is Andy Fisher at BokkenShop , if anyone knows of others please share with the group.

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              • #8
                Shinai are easy to find or make for nito, the issue is trying to find the correct bokutoh for nito kata practice. One good source is Andy Fisher at BokkenShop , if anyone knows of others please share with the group.[/QUOTE]

                Kingfisher Woodworks makes some GREAT high line bokkens Sensei, including short.

                http://kingfisherwoodworks.com/mm5/m...tegory_Code=ww

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