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Shinai Grip Sizes

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  • Shinai Grip Sizes

    Hi All,

    Sorry for my ignorance for shinai grip sizes. I thought that they just came as regular, thick etc. Anyway, I stumbled upon a kendo store website that has certain grip sizes for their shinai. Can anyone provide a guide on the measurements/differences the size can make?

    Link below as an example

    http://www.mazkiya.net/catalog/39-ke...nai-p-748.html

    Sizes range from 25-30. I know it says regular, medium, thick etc, but looking for more like is regular size equal to like young adult hand size or adult asian size? Just looking for something scalable to compare with. Since I can't actually hold the shinai, would like to see if I can understand the measurements better.

    Also, anyone have/tried the shikumi/bizan/fudoshin shinai on the website?

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    Just get a ruler...it's just the width of the grip. You can easily figure this out by measuring what you have and what your dojo mates have.

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    • #3
      Just looking at the old forum but kinda reminded me of the question I had. Many of us buy shinai over the web and sometimes gets surprised by the size of the grip that was not expected.
      When you order Standard or Thick grip you expect certain sizes but when I recently ordered one Thick grip, it was thicker than I expected. Even then there are differences between the size of the grips between the same brand same models. When 3 shinais have similar acceptable sizes but slightly different grip sizes, what effect do they have on your kendo? Does thicker grip provides more stable Seme? Does thinner grip provides more speed?

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      • #4
        The first 2-3 shinai I bought were through my club, and their grip was very thin. The only other shinai I've tried was the Tendou, from 9circles, whose thicker grip suited me much better. That said, I didn't see any difference in seme or speed, just that it was less tiring to grip.

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        • #5
          I used to favor koban but once I learned to cut from my hips, my tenouchi (and cut) lightened up and I stopped worrying about about shinai tsuka shapes and sizes. Mind you I am only ever so slightly above the average Japanese size (they're not that small nowadays) so I would not have the degree of size problems that a large Westerner with big hands would have.

          For me, shinai balance plays a bigger role. My go to at the moment is the standard 39 "*光" from Eikobudogu. The balance is towards the tsuka so it feels light. I've had quite a few people questioned whether it meets regulations, which it comfortably does. For a dobari, I personally like the shape. The downside is that staves often do not appear aesthetically consistent with each other. They come pre-waxed and so far have needed minimal maintenance and last quite a long time, which might have more to do with the fact that around the time I found these shinai was also when I started to learn how not to power cuts with my arms. At this time, the price is JPY3400 for a 39, which is average for a budget workhorse shinai.

          For anyone in or passing through Tokyo, EIkobudogu has a shop near Ueno Park. They take online and phone orders but that's best left to Japanese speakers last time I checked.

          Also, it's kind of hard to obtain but there are tsukagawa made of deer skin. I bought one for a friend. It was super soft and I wish I could try it but I never found one for my tsuka length. I imagine they feel grippier and are less prone to becoming hard and slippery over time (as deer skin deals with moisture better) so helps with keeping tenouchi soft... but this is just what I imagine.

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          • #6
            Oh... kanji didn't appear correctly... the shinai is called "Eikou", the first two characters from Eikobudogu.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dillon View Post
              Also, it's kind of hard to obtain but there are tsukagawa made of deer skin.
              Personally, if it was just for everyday practice, I'd just wrap the tsuka-gawa with an overgrip for tennis raquets. I already have done so for all my bokken, and let me tell you... it feels amazing.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Anorymous View Post

                Personally, if it was just for everyday practice, I'd just wrap the tsuka-gawa with an overgrip for tennis raquets. I already have done so for all my bokken, and let me tell you... it feels amazing.
                Ummm, no thanks.

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