Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Just starting kendo

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Just starting kendo

    I am going to my first kendo class in a few days. I went to a session today to observe, and the sensei said I should get a kind of shinai that has a "fat handle". He used a specific term that I forgot by the time I got home.

    Does anyone have a an idea what kind of shinai he was talking about? I know he said to get a 39 as well.

    Also does anyone know of a good resource I can read that has depictions and identified parts of kendo equipment. I'm trying to learn as much nomenclature as possible.

    Thank everyone for your help in advance.

  • #2
    Welcome Theta.

    Your sensei probably meant shnai size 39 (for adult).
    Not sure about fat handle. There are shinai with fat handle for people with big hands but don't know if it is better for biginner.

    Following website has a downloadable kendo manual.

    http://www6.big.or.jp/~budogu/manu/topm.html

    Cheers
    Last edited by Taek; 4th October 2004, 02:14 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you can i suggest you find a suplier in or around your area and go have a feel of a few differnt types. they vary in weight and balance depending on the make. usally the supplier will help guide you if they know what there talking about. otherwise online ordering options.

      Good luck


      John

      Comment


      • #4
        Theta,

        If you go the on-line route, you may also wish to try www.eguchi.net . I have always found them to be very professional, knowledgale and kendoka-friendly. Good luck and welcome to the fraternity.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you everyone for your input and suggestions, especially the online manual with kendo terms.


          Really looking forward to learning to walk on Tuesday.

          Comment


          • #6
            Theta. I'm in a similar boat (starting kendo in the next two weeks) and had a similar discussion with my soon to be sensei, who made the same recommendations. What I'm guessing your instructor meant by "fat handle" was a shinai with a round grip (which is the vast majority of them I believe) rather than an oval grip, which are, I believe, more expensive (and perhaps best used in the hands of someone more experienced than you and I at this point).

            Cheers and good luck. (personally, I'm excited about getting into this!)
            JCH

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmm,

              Tbe best bet would be to recheck with your sensei. There are two styles of shinai, the "oval grip" koban style and the "round grip" style. The oval grip does look "fatter" than the round grip if you look at it from the right perspective.

              The oval grip is about 10 dollars more expensive than the round grip, and the usuable lifetime is slightly less than with a round style shinai because you are limited in which way you can rotate your slats.

              However, I have overheard several conversations with senseis where the thought is that it may be better for beginners to start with a "oval grip" shinai rather than the more traditional round style.

              The logic is that the oval grip forces your grip to be in the correct position more intuitively, and thus you can avoid learning bad habits that can develop by holding a round grip shinai incorrectly.

              Again, I would check with your sensei if you are unsure. The two dojo's that I practice at don't really have a strict guideline towards which to use, but each dojo is different in attitutes and tradition...

              Cheers!

              Comment


              • #8
                From the half hour and more kata sessions we have each week I have noticed my grip and swing with the shinai is much improved. I think that when I hold the bokken for kata before kendo practice, and then the shinai my hands pretty much stay in that position, especially during the tenouchi. I guess not smashing uchidachi in the head is a pretty good incentive to learn tenouchi.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tozando sells shinai with a fatter tsuka for people with large hands. I would ask your sensei though. Those shinai are not cheap and have to come all the way from Japan. Anyway my hands are pretty big and I have no problem with a normal shinai.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    New Shinai/Tsuba Question

                    My sensei brought in a new shinai for me to try out. It seemed to git my hand well (well he told me it looked like it fit my hand well :P). After he was placing the tsuba on the tuska (guard on the hilt), he had me hold my arm at a right angle, and then hold the shinai verticle - to check the length of the tsuka I would presume.

                    He noted that the tsuba did not go all the way up the tsuka-gawa (leather on hilt). He said to take a blade and scrape away some material, to see if I could get the tsuba to seat further down the tsuka.

                    I noticed later that the tsuba has a "38" imprinted in the plastic, and that my shinai is a 39. Does this mean I might be able to get a new tsuba that is "39", and might seat further up the tsuka? Or should I follow my sensei's advice and carefully scrape away some of the material from the tuska-gawa?

                    Thanks in advance for helping a new shinai owner understand some of the nuiances.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Theta
                      My sensei brought in a new shinai for me to try out. It seemed to git my hand well
                      Oh yeah, it will "git" it all right.

                      Originally posted by Theta
                      I noticed later that the tsuba has a "38" imprinted in the plastic, and that my shinai is a 39. Does this mean I might be able to get a new tsuba that is "39", and might seat further up the tsuka?
                      No, I don't think so - but I'll admit I never noticed markings on the tsuba before. Instead of a knife, I use a drill and a rotary file to open the hole up. There are also tsuba reaming tools sold, but you can buy 15 new tsubas for what one of those cost.

                      Each shinai is a little different new tsuba's usually need to be adjusted. Be sure when you do it that you "break" (round over) the sharp edge where the hole was enlarged, I've seen one where the tsuba edge cut into the leather and caused the tsuru to loosen up as the leather tore and pulled away.

                      Originally posted by Enkorat
                      The logic is that the oval grip forces your grip to be in the correct position more intuitively, and thus you can avoid learning bad habits that can develop by holding a round grip shinai incorrectly.
                      I'd agree with that. I bought an eguchi koban shinai and it helped straighten my cuts as well as stopped the twisting I was experiencing. It seems heavier though.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paikea
                        Each shinai is a little different new tsuba's usually need to be adjusted. Be sure when you do it that you "break" (round over) the sharp edge where the hole was enlarged, I've seen one where the tsuba edge cut into the leather and caused the tsuru to loosen up as the leather tore and pulled away.
                        Thanks for the suggestion. I took a Dremel tool with a mild abrasive wheel. Opened it up perfectly.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X