Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tsuru tightening

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tsuru tightening

    Yesterday I tightened my shinai's tsuru but it took ridiculous amount of time. Then I started thinking: Since it's a series of loops not knots, it should be possible to tighten it without completely taking it apart. Just pulling a one string should suffice. I wanted the opinions of more experienced kenshi before trying it. And if it's not possible, any advice to make normal process faster would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Wearing rubber gloves should make it easier. I still find that I have to unravel the whole tsuru first, though.

    Comment


    • #3
      There is an English translation of a kendo equipment manual that that the authors put out for free on PDF (Japanese printed version cost JPY600). You can download it from this page. Chapter 1 page 13 describes tsuru setup.

      I am having difficulty getting my head around your description (what do you mean completely take apart... all leather parts removed too?). Nevertheless, in general to tighten the tsuru one would have to completely unwind it from the tsuka-gawa-himo, pull tight, then rewind around the tsuka-gawa-himo again. Undoing the tsuru more than this should not be necessary. The tsuru should not have to come out of the leather komono or the loop in the case of not having a komono. The komono/loop acts like a pulley and helps to keep tension in the tsuru in an easier more manageable way than if the tsuru were to connect to the tsuka-gawa-himo only once. If the tsuru is not moving through the komono/loop easily, something may be wrong with the set up.

      When I re-tension, once I pull it tight (tsuru coming down from looping though komono) and before I start looping it around the kawa-himo (the loop near the tsuba), I hold down the tsuru with a finger against the shinai just before the kawa-himo so that it keeps most of the tension while looping through the kawa-himo (p.14, in between the top middle and right images). Once looped through the kawa-himo (top right image), the tension should stay as long as you keep a little bit of tension and you can do the winding around the long part of the tsuka-gawa-himo easily. A few loops around the tsuka-gawa-himo and you could actually completely let go of the tsuru without it coming undone. New tsuru will stretch a lot (in engineering this is called creep) so you may find yourself re-tensioning after only a few practices.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by verissimus View Post
        Wearing rubber gloves should make it easier. I still find that I have to unravel the whole tsuru first, though.
        Why on earth would you need rubber gloves? You're not removing the tsukagawa, just tightening up the string.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post

          Why on earth would you need rubber gloves? You're not removing the tsukagawa, just tightening up the string.
          I mean the regular kitchen kind. I find it gives me better grip when pulling on the tsuru.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by verissimus View Post

            I mean the regular kitchen kind. I find it gives me better grip when pulling on the tsuru.
            If you need that kind of grip maybe you're pulling too hard, or you don't have your tsuru tied correctly.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post

              If you need that kind of grip maybe you're pulling too hard, or you don't have your tsuru tied correctly.
              I try to keep it at the same tension as when the shinai is new.Since the leather parts tend to stretch over time, I don't find it surprising that I have to pull a little harder every few weeks when rotating the staves. It's very likely that mine isn't the most optimal way of gripping the tsuru, but I've been fortunate in that my shinai last much longer than most people I know, so I haven't thought about trying anything different. Kitchen gloves are useful if one isn't particularly nimble with one's fingerwork.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I'm using pliers for better grip since I'm used to manipulating thread with tools. A very small one.

                dillon, What I'm trying to say that since it's a continuous string without knot, pulling one should tighten all. For example: without removing nakayui, simply untying it near tsukawa and pulling one string to tighten all [I felt like Sauron for a moment]. It would be less then perfect I'm sure but could it be used for quick adjustments?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Undoing nakayui should not be necessary and I cannot imagine the nakayui getting done so tight that it would prevent tension in the tsuru from passing through. You should only have to undo the winding of the tsuru around the tsuka-gawa-himo so that it is not on top of itself and can be pulled freely. New tsuru may certainly feel like you need to undo the nakayui until they are broken in somewhat but in actuality this is not needed. You might want to do it anyway just to get familiar with doing up the nakayui if shinai maintenance is new to you.

                  I have this image now of verissimus looking like Tyler Durden.
                  Last edited by dillon; 1st July 2015, 10:04 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S51Nq2NtRV4 about 10:30 is where assembling the shinai begins.
                    12:20 is about where the tsuru is put in and tightened.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think tightening tsuru and tightening nakayui are two different thing. I've done either without doing the other. Of course sometimes I do both however.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X