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  • How Do I Sort Out My New Shinai???

    i got my first shinai a few days ago. it is all wrapped up with red strigs etc. my sensei said somthing about taking it apart and putting oil on it. does any1 have any istructions or use full websites for me to use??????//

  • #2
    There are a number of sites that discuss this. One of the better guides for shinai oiling is at Kendo America:

    http://www.kendo-usa.org/reference/firststrike.htm

    Take care

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    • #3
      I like using lemon oil, sold in the furniture care section of your local store. You don't need a lot, just enough to keep the bamboo from drying and shrinking.

      Other people like various oils, but whatever you do, don't use a petroleum based oil, it can do serious damage to someone's eyes if it happens to splatter.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by joekc6nlx
        I like using lemon oil, sold in the furniture care section of your local store. You don't need a lot, just enough to keep the bamboo from drying and shrinking.

        Other people like various oils, but whatever you do, don't use a petroleum based oil, it can do serious damage to someone's eyes if it happens to splatter.
        I don't get any of this. I break a shinai about about every 2 months and I use relatively cheap ones, so I just toss them. I buy them 6 at a time by mail and while I like ones that are tsuka heavy, whatever I get is fine. Is this just a sign of my inexperience or are some higher ranked people similarly unfussy.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Old Warrior
          I don't get any of this. I break a shinai about about every 2 months and I use relatively cheap ones, so I just toss them. I buy them 6 at a time by mail and while I like ones that are tsuka heavy, whatever I get is fine. Is this just a sign of my inexperience or are some higher ranked people similarly unfussy.
          It might just come to a personal basis. I take good care of my shinai, oil them, sand them, sing them lullabies, etc. For me it's a case of third world student syndrome. I simply couldn't buy shinai every two months.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lloromannic
            It might just come to a personal basis. I take good care of my shinai, oil them, sand them, sing them lullabies, etc. For me it's a case of third world student syndrome. I simply couldn't buy shinai every two months.
            I think it shows more a different kinda respect for your equipment, not that I an saying that old warrior doesn't respects his equipment.

            I only take my shinai apart when the tsuru should be put tighter or when i think something should be done to the shinai.

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            • #7
              Old warrior... the more advanced you get the more you want a certain feel to your shinai. Better shinais, beleive it or not, are weighted differently and even shaped slightly differently but cost more as well. For the small amount of effort it takes to keep a shinai properly maintained you will break fewer and play with a better quality shinai. It comes down to balance points and weight differentials as well as the quality of bamboo used and profile of the shinai.

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              • #8
                Another point to keep in mind... when you break a shinai in shiai you are exposing your opponent's face to a shower of bamboo splinters (on a men cut). This can be quite painful if one gets under the skin or in the eyes (this is why one inspects their shinai before practice and shiai for slivers starting to form or for signs of compomise in the shinai structure. You can shave down any small slivers but if a shinai shows a sign of irregularity or breakage it should not be used). If you are breaking your shinai regularly I am suprised your sensei has not talked to you about it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MikeW
                  Old warrior... the more advanced you get the more you want a certain feel to your shinai. Better shinais, beleive it or not, are weighted differently and even shaped slightly differently but cost more as well. For the small amount of effort it takes to keep a shinai properly maintained you will break fewer and play with a better quality shinai. It comes down to balance points and weight differentials as well as the quality of bamboo used and profile of the shinai.
                  I only do nito and therefore I use a 37. 37's are basically for kids and I have to tape up the tsuka so it is wide enough for my hand. I have been trying to find an oval 37, but, to date, no luck. Since the nito style is to block and wait for that one good chance, the shinai takes a real beating, as well as the kote (mostly the fist). I go through a pair a year. While I keep a good eye on the shinai for splinters, they are cheap enough that I treat them like batteries.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Old Warrior
                    I only do nito and therefore I use a 37. 37's are basically for kids and I have to tape up the tsuka so it is wide enough for my hand. I have been trying to find an oval 37, but, to date, no luck. Since the nito style is to block and wait for that one good chance, the shinai takes a real beating, as well as the kote (mostly the fist). I go through a pair a year. While I keep a good eye on the shinai for splinters, they are cheap enough that I treat them like batteries.
                    I haven't heard of oval 37 shinai, but Tozando does sell a 37 Dobari carbon shinai which would last a long time.

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                    • #11
                      Old Warrior, to get a large tsuka on your nito shinai you will have to pay more, so it might not be worth your while. I still beleive it is in both your and your opponents best interest to keep your shinai oiled regardless of whether you are practicing nito or not. Unfortunately I have not seen any oval handle nito shinai either (suprising in a way, but nito isn't as popular so perhaps that is why). I use oval handle but of course in my case it is standard 39 size for kendo.

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