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how to do haya-suburi

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  • how to do haya-suburi

    How is the haya suburi properly done? I can't cope with it's footwork and its frustrating. Is it required in any grading exam?

  • #2
    It's not done in grading exams. Haya-suburi is meant entirely as an aerobic exercise. You'll learn it through time. Explaining these things in words is pointless.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by -Miburo-
      How is the haya suburi properly done? I can't cope with it's footwork and its frustrating. Is it required in any grading exam?
      I made a translation a while back about sonkyo and hayasuburi.
      I will post it here.

      ("Sonkyo" and "Hayasuburi footwork" 2000/10/26j

      The order of this instruction has become a little reversed, but for beginners it is good to teach the movement of "sonkyo", which also acts as training for the legs. It is easy to squat down with the heels flat on the ground, but many people are unable to site in "sonkyo" with the body balanced over the feet with heels raised, and this can make "reiho" difficult to teach.

      Because of this training sonkyo is taught to beginners who are training for the first time as a physical exercise.

      Implementation of training is as follows.
      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      1. From "basic stance", rotate the left heel in an anti-clockwise direction around the point on the sole at the base of the second and third toes, leaving the right foot where it is.
      2. At the signal of a whistle, slowly bend the knees and lift both heels up, as if your behind and heels are going to touch.
      3. At the signal of a whistle, slowly stand up, and return to "basic stance" by rotating the left heel in a clockwise direction.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Blow the whistle to make a long sound, directing the movement of squatting and standing up.

      Points of consideration are as follow.
      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      * When squatting don't allow the upper body to lean forward.
      * When squatting don't let the distance between the two feet open too much.
      * The right knee points a little right of forward. The left knee points directly left. (Right natural posture)
      * The line of the shoulders is a little to the left, but should not be too far to the left.
      * When standing up one's posture should not lean forward.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      There are always some people who lower their behinds straight down, so it is a good idea for the instructor to instruct so the behind can be lowered slowly.

      Also, there are some people who don't have much leg strength who almost groan when trying to stand up, so you should instruct to stand up in a smooth motion silently.

      Another item is "hayasuburi footwork". This should be taught with sonkyo after students have understood "movement of the body" and "okuri-ashi".

      When implementation training have both hands on your hips.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      1. Bend both knees a little to build up energy for the forward movement.
      2. From basic stance propel the centre of gravity in a forward jump by pusing off with the left foot.
      3. Land with the front of the right foot, push right out with the left leg and then return to the position of basic swiftly, landing with the front foot first.
      4. Push off from the sole of the right foot at the base of the second and third toes and propel your left leg and centre of gravity in a backwards jump.
      5. Land with the left foot first, then kick out fully with the right foot and then swiftly land from the front of the foot first in the position of basic stance.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      Points 1 to 5 above should be carried out the the direction of a whistle signal.

      At the first whistle blow jump "right leg, left leg" to the front, and with the next whistle blow jump back "left leg, right leg". At first perform this slowly maintaining balance and gradually decrease the time between whistle blows until quick movement can be peformed accurately.

      Train gradually faster until eventually students can perform this at the pace of choyaku-haya-suburi.

      Points of consideration are as follow.
      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      * When jumping forward, don't put the right foot further forward than the knee.
      * When jumping forward, don't stick your behind out and allow your posture to be compromised (also be careful about curving your back)
      * After jumping you should be careful that your balance balance is such that the centre of gravity is between the right and left legs.
      * As the movement becomes faster the feet of some people will not land in the position of "basic stance" so make sure students are aware of this.
      * Students who tend to straighten their knees right out will not be able to do this technique so you should teach to keep the "springs of the legs (arch of the foot, ankle, knee and hip joint) " should be used in a relaxed manner.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------

      It seems that it is easier for students to understand an learn if the movement of "sonkyo" and "haya-suburi footwork" are taught separately. Students find this training quite enjoyable, so I think it is worth including.

      Comment


      • #4
        Haya-suburi isn't done in any formal exams that I'm aware of. In our club, we use it as part of the evaluation on whether students can wear bogu or not as it exposes a number of weak points in people's kendo and also shows a little bit of fitness. Basically, if you can't do the haya-suburi footwork and swing correctly while moving at a medium pace, then you aren't ready to wear bogu yet (IMNSHO). So just ask your sensei for help and keep practicing. If you are having lots of trouble, work on it by yourself and go really slow, only speeding up when you are sure you've got the footwork OK.

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        • #5
          i would be interested in knowing how other people move their feet in haya-suburi, do you slide them or jump?
          in our club, and most people i've come across, we are taught to jump, so that your feet make a kind of bom bom, bom bom sound hitting the floor. however, we have had a japanese san dan come to train with us, and he told me that you should slide your feet so they never leave contact with the floor. i figured both ways are probably right, depending what you've been taught, but what do other people do?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alicia
            i would be interested in knowing how other people move their feet in haya-suburi, do you slide them or jump?
            in our club, and most people i've come across, we are taught to jump, so that your feet make a kind of bom bom, bom bom sound hitting the floor. however, we have had a japanese san dan come to train with us, and he told me that you should slide your feet so they never leave contact with the floor. i figured both ways are probably right, depending what you've been taught, but what do other people do?
            I'd say that you should slide your feet, but that is because that is how I was taught. My sensei in Japan made a big deal about not jumping.

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            • #7
              Slide, baby, slide. Make sure there's seperate foot motion too - right left, left right.

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              • #8
                My senpai always told me to keep a constant rythym, almost as if you were beating it out on a drum. I don't know about sliding, but keep your hips on the same level as much as possible.

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                • #9
                  Imafuji sensei says " Slide, no jumping, no sound, simply elegant."

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                  • #10
                    If you can't slide fast enough, is it acceptable?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by -Miburo-
                      If you can't slide fast enough, is it acceptable?
                      Personally, I think it's acceptable. It's more important to have the correct footwork and stroke when doing it, than to go very fast. The same goes for kirikaeshi.

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                      • #12
                        I think the most important thing is trying to do them the best you can even if you dont do them perfectly at first. I, sometimes, am shy of trying to do it as my best so i f*ck it up ..

                        Of course,there is pointers that you have to follow, but even experienced people can do it a little bit wrong. So watch/ask a lot of people about doing suburi. Thats why i try to do , slowly but surely getting better.

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                        • #13
                          bringing threads back to life!

                          How many of you guys are taught to use tenouchi in this suburi? Or, do you perform it by hopping back and forward without a definate start or stop?

                          I was taught to punch it out, and almost perform a fullbody tenouch on the men cut, then quickly back (left foot landing first followed by the right) with a large swing, without stopping punch forward again.

                          I've never in my life seen sliding footwork in haya-suburi (as in suri-ashi)!

                          I ask because im yet to see this performed at a speed where it can be done correctly, and i see alot of 'hopping' going on!

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                          • #14
                            would be nice to have some video of people during haya-suburi.

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                            • #15
                              Uuuh, I think the best pointer is that hayasuburi is just the same as skipping rope, but than without the rope. My advise is to do 200 hayasuburi's in full bogu at the end of every practice.

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