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  • #31
    Originally posted by sirius1906 View Post
    Then as you said, build the muscle group to support the joint. I need to learn to pace myself with injury, and not go a million mph right out of the gate.
    Yup. We're not spring chicken any more. Gotta listen to your body. Squats are about as good as any exercise to strengthen the knees. If they hurt during regular squats (you wanna go down deep enough so that the tops of the thighs are parallel to the ground) then start out with wall squats.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFYJmZGNwQo
    Then try lifting up one leg during the wall squats.

    We'll miss you at the nationals.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Halcyon View Post
      Here's an article in the NY Times that has pretty detailed instructions, including a video.
      http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...-tennis-elbow/
      I've had this device for months and barely use it because I can't figure it out.

      The NYT article is more helpful than just what comes in the box, but even so I still can't figure out at the end are you supposed to be resisting with the involved wrist as it unwinds forward or back? In other words, do you end up with your involved wrist pronated forward or back?

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      • #33
        Laughing Gravy (wadda name!), I think I got it - twist the bar down horizontally, using the uninjured arm. Then straighten out the twisted bar with the injured arm?

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        • #34
          Halcyon, Thanks for giving link - I think I understand (giving me 10 days before its delivery, to figure out how ta translate that into Okinawan-dialect Japanese, hehe). One question: after doing all, then do you hold that position for a few secs (like in isometrics)?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Tort-Speed View Post
            One question: after doing all, then do you hold that position for a few secs (like in isometrics)?
            Personally, no. I don't really hold it. Maybe for less than a second, just to make sure that I have reached full range of motion. The whole point of this exercise is that you are putting load on the muscles/tendons on the eccentric (lengthening) motion. For example, the equivalent for your biceps would be to do a bicep curl without any weight, and then put a load on it only as you extend your arm (the eccentric motion).

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            • #36
              The directions that come with it are not very good, but if you do a youtube search they cover it in detail, or this is the video that I found to be helpful.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Tort-Speed View Post
                Laughing Gravy (wadda name!), I think I got it - twist the bar down horizontally, using the uninjured arm. Then straighten out the twisted bar with the injured arm?
                Hmm, not quite sure if this is right. Did you watch the video in the NY Times article? Should be pretty clear there.

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                • #38
                  Here's an article in the NY Times that has pretty detailed instructions, including a video.
                  Yep, that's the one that I followed.

                  Squats are about as good as any exercise to strengthen the knees.
                  Squats will strengthen your quads and your calves, but will do nothing for the muscles on either side that stabilize the knees. The thing that works best for me is simple leg lifts. Lie on your back, lift your foot off the floor about 18 inches, and hold it for a count of 30. You do the same thing while lying on your stomach, and then while lying on both sides. When it gets easy, you start adding weights to your foot. Because you are doing this exercise in all four directions on each leg, it strengthens the muscles equally in every direction to stabilize the knee. Most chronic knee problems are caused by one set of muscles being much stronger then the others.

                  The NYT article is more helpful than just what comes in the box, but even so I still can't figure out at the end are you supposed to be resisting with the involved wrist as it unwinds forward or back? In other words, do you end up with your involved wrist pronated forward or back?
                  It should be unwinding forward. The idea is to be able to extend your wrist and elbow flexor muscles to their maximum relaxed length while keeping them under a decreasing load.

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                  • #39
                    Doc told me to do leg press and stationary bike (without bending the knee too much, and align the leg with knee) and some stretching. I'll add squat and leg lifting to that too. Maybe I'll just do standing iai, suburi and kihon for kendo and no keiko for now. I'll use this "opportunity" to work on the basics. Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!!! :_(

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by sirius1906 View Post
                      Doc told me to do leg press and stationary bike (without bending the knee too much, and align the leg with knee) and some stretching. I'll add squat and leg lifting to that too. Maybe I'll just do standing iai, suburi and kihon for kendo and no keiko for now. I'll use this "opportunity" to work on the basics. Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!!! :_(
                      Leg press is basically a squat, but done with a machine.

                      Is this your primary care physician? If so, you really should go to a specialist. There are some really good sports docs in the NYC area. You'd be surprised at how different their recommendations are compared to general practitioners. Personally, I've sworn off taking advice about sports-related injuries from docs who are not athletes themselves or regularly work with athletes. A lot of doctors just don't get it.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Halcyon View Post
                        Is this your primary care physician? If so, you really should go to a specialist. There are some really good sports docs in the NYC area. You'd be surprised at how different their recommendations are compared to general practitioners. Personally, I've sworn off taking advice about sports-related injuries from docs who are not athletes themselves or regularly work with athletes. A lot of doctors just don't get it.
                        Exactly so! Forum gods won't let me rep you for that important bit of info!

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Halcyon View Post
                          Leg press is basically a squat, but done with a machine.

                          Is this your primary care physician? If so, you really should go to a specialist. There are some really good sports docs in the NYC area. You'd be surprised at how different their recommendations are compared to general practitioners. Personally, I've sworn off taking advice about sports-related injuries from docs who are not athletes themselves or regularly work with athletes. A lot of doctors just don't get it.
                          "Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Osteopathic Medicine, specialized in treating musculoskeletal diseases related joint pain, numbness, headache, dizziness etc." He's a friend of mine, about my age, NYU grad. He might not have tons of experience but at least I trust he's look out for my well being. Plus, he'll squeeze me in when he can, no appointments needed. :P If my knees don't get better, I'll ask you for doc recommendation.

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                          • #43
                            Halcyon, Yup watched it but a mirror image is confusing to what's left of the ole brain... Will check it out when the Bar arrives. Thanks.
                            Meanwhile, reading about hope for bad knees, if chronic ACL, hmmm. Haven't given away the Iai-toh yet but its case is pretty dusty. Did find a machine in the local exercise center that when standing on, gives a printout of where your muscles are weak, body fat, etc. Then the staff made me a program based on it: waist/back muscles are above-average strong (yea Kendo), knee area muscles weak in both.
                            pgsmith, squats scare the #%&@ outta me but straight leg lifts sound good. Will try it.
                            Last edited by Tort-Speed; 13th June 2012, 02:18 AM.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Tort-Speed View Post
                              squats scare the #%&@ outta me but straight leg lifts sound good. Will try it.
                              You can always start out with no extra weights at all. Just your own body weight. Make sure you're doing it with proper form -- i.e. knee shouldn't be going forward of your toes. You need to stick out your butt as if you're trying to sit down on a chair. if that sill hurts your knees, try the wall squats (video posted above). If you're only doing exercises that aren't bending your knee, then you're not really strengthening your knee.

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                              • #45
                                No sarcasm intended but as that great (visually) clip is titled "Wall Squats [WSs] Prevention ACL," can someone who already has an ACL injury still try WSs? But definitely do get your point about knee strengthening.

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