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  • Magic of Beetroot Juice

    Its been shown to increase stamina and reduce blood pressure. It seems drinking a pint per day can have positive effects in as little as 4-5 days, allowing you to train harder/making training easier.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8186947.stm

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661447

    It seems the nitrate in beetroot juice is readily converted into nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator, which allows more oxygen carrying blood into the muscles. This same vasodilation reduces resting blood pressure.

    Might be worth trying. The only side effect is purple urine, which I think is actually pretty cool!

  • #2
    you watched the One show on BBC1 tonight

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ghostdancer View Post
      you watched the One show on BBC1 tonight
      PLEASE! I'm a scientist of some repute! No, you're right I did, but wasn't it interesting? I'm popping along to Sainsbury's tomorrow to buy some, aren't you?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Kokoro777 View Post
        The only side effect is purple urine
        Well that and terminal nausea from drinking beet juice.

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        • #5
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COQn2...eature=related

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          • #6
            Vasodilators and Nitric Oxide in beetroot juice... Anybody else thinking that another side-effect of this may also put one (in particular males) in a rather, hmmm, tricky situation (see viagra/sildenafil for explanation)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
              Well that and terminal nausea from drinking beet juice.
              Ha ha, that's true, but didn't you find beer tasted awful the first time you sipped it as a kid? And yet now...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Trent View Post
                Vasodilators and Nitric Oxide in beetroot juice... Anybody else thinking that another side-effect of this may also put one (in particular males) in a rather, hmmm, tricky situation (see viagra/sildenafil for explanation)
                You could simply claim it was a 'spare shinai'...just in case.

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                • #9
                  Hmm. but alcohol is also a vasodilator and I'd venture to say that most of us are familiar with and able to enjoy mixtures of ethyl alcohol and other uh.. impurities. I'm not so certain I want to change a routine that is already proven to work ;-)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rfoxmich View Post
                    Hmm. but alcohol is also a vasodilator
                    Yes, but only in the peripheral parts of the body like the skin. Besides the other effects associated with alcohol would negate any benefits: its hard to do Kendo when you're lying on your back-singing about 'A Young Lady from Lunt...'

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                    • #11
                      Is Dwight in this thread?

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                      • #12
                        a test that includes eight people isn't very convincing.. maybe if it was 800. There are so many factors to be counted in, you just can't achieve a relevant result with 8 test objects, dunno

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                        • #13
                          Yes you can. In statistics you have something called a 'power rating' in which can tell you the minimum number of subjects you require in order to show a minor effect, a medium effect and a large effect. You feed in your numbers and the statistical test will tell you the minimum number of subjects you require to make your data valid. The authors have done this and their paper is peer reviewed. This is how pharmaceutical companies get an idea of how many volunteers they'll need to make their clinical trials valid in the eyes of the governmental bodies such as the FDA and NICE, otherwise it could cost a fortune to test drugs on too many people when it isn't necessary.

                          Peer review, in science, is when your pre-publication paper is sent to your rivals by the journal editor, and they try their damnedest to kick holes in your experiments, your interpretation and everything they possibly can and thus stop you getting published. If they can't do this, the paper is deemed worthy of publication-this is the strength of peer review and is the foundation of science. The paper about beetroot juice and cardiovascular ability and blood pressure appeared in a peer reviewed journal.

                          Anecdotally, I can report that my uncontrollable blood pressure is lowered nicely by drinking 500ml per day, I've tried it on alternate days etc and found it to be reliable. My stamina appears to be better now but that is just a subjective observation.

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                          • #14
                            they want to fix a number like 16% using 8 test subjects? I still don't see how thats possible. Considering the test subjects are human beings its even more unbelievable.

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                            • #15
                              Buy and read a book like this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Choosing-Usi...5641648&sr=1-6

                              ....perhaps do a few courses on statistics at your local college and you'll understand exactly how it works!

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